Year 6 unit overview — Australian Curriculum: History



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Year 6 unit overview — Australian Curriculum: History


Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), Australian Curriculum v3.0: History for Foundation–10, .

School name

Unit title

Duration of unit

Our School

Investigating the emergence of Australia as a diverse society

20 hours




Unit outline

The Year 6 curriculum moves from colonial Australia to the development of Australia as a nation, particularly after 1900. Students explore the factors that led to Federation and experiences of democracy and citizenship over time. Students understand the significance of Australia’s British heritage, the Westminster system, and other models that influenced the development of Australia’s system of government. Students learn about the way of life of people who migrated to Australia and their contributions to Australia’s economic and social development.

In this unit students explore groups of people who migrated to Australia and the reasons for their migration. They identify and explore the contributions of different individuals and groups to the development of Australian society.


There is a strong focus in this unit on the use of the historical skills. The students will explicitly focus on:

  • sequencing people and events

  • using historical terms and concepts

  • identifying points of view

  • identifying and posing questions to inform inquiries

  • identifying, locating and using a range of relevant sources

  • comparing information from a range of sources

  • developing texts that incorporate source materials.


The key inquiry questions for the unit are:

  • How did Australian society change throughout the twentieth century?

  • Who were the people who came to Australia? Why did they come?

  • What contribution have significant individuals and groups made to the development of Australian society?




Identify curriculum

Content descriptions to be taught

General capabilities and crosscurriculum priorities

Historical Knowledge and Understanding

Historical Skills

Australia as a Nation

  • Stories of groups of people who migrated to Australia (including from ONE Asian country) and the reasons they migrated, such as World War II and Australian migration programs since the war (ACHHK115)

  • The contribution of individuals and groups, including Aboriginal people and/or Torres Strait Islanders and migrants, to the development of Australian society, for example in areas such as the economy, education, science, the arts, sport (ACHHK116)

Chronology, terms and concepts

  • Sequence historical people and events (ACHHS117)

  • Use historical terms and concepts (ACHHS118)

Historical questions and research

  • Identify questions to inform an historical inquiry (ACHHS119)

  • Identify and locate a range of relevant sources (ACHHS120)

Analysis and use of sources

  • Locate information related to inquiry questions in a range of sources (ACHHS121)

  • Compare information from a range of sources (ACHHS122)

Perspectives and interpretations

  • Identify points of view in the past and present (ACHHS123)

Explanation and communication

  • Develop texts, particularly narratives and descriptions, which incorporate source materials (ACHHS124)

  • Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies (ACHHS125)

description: gc_literacy Literacy

Use historical terms and concepts related to the unit and develop key questions to inform an historical inquiry



description: gc_numeracy Numeracy

Use timelines to describe past events and changes



description: gc_ict ICT capability

Use a range of digital technologies to find material relevant to an inquiry



description: gc_critical Critical and creative thinking

Explore reasons for migration through a range of sources and discuss experiences of people who migrated



description: gc_personal_social Personal and social capability

Exchange information and foster a collaborative response



description: gc_intercultural Intercultural understanding

Explore individual narratives of people who migrated to Australia and identify cultural practices of these groups



Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

Explore the contribution of individuals or groups to the development of Australian society



description: cc_asia Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia

Examine cultural practices related to family life, beliefs and customs of newly-arrived migrant groups from Asia



Historical Understanding

This unit provides opportunities for students to develop historical understandings particularly focused on the key concepts of:

Sources

Written or non-written materials that can be used to investigate the past. A source becomes “evidence” if it is of value to a particular inquiry.

Continuity and change

Continuities are aspects of the past that have remained the same over certain periods of time. Changes are events or developments from the past that represent modifications, alterations and transformations.

Cause and effect

The relationship between a factor or set of factors (cause/s) and consequence/s (effect/s). These form sequences of events and developments over time.

Perspectives

A point of view or position from which events are seen and understood, and influenced by age, gender, culture, social position and beliefs and values.

Empathy

An understanding of the past from the point of view of the participant/s, including an appreciation of the circumstances faced, and the motivations, values and attitudes behind actions.

Significance

The importance that is assigned to particular aspects of the past, such as events, developments, movements and historical sites, and includes an examination of the principles behind the selection of what should be investigated and remembered.

Achievement standard

By the end of Year 6, students identify change and continuity and describe the causes and effects of change on society. They compare the different experiences of people in the past. They explain the significance of an individual and group.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, and represent time by creating timelines. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They identify a range of sources and locate and compare information to answer inquiry questions. They examine sources to identify and describe points of view. Students develop texts, particularly narratives and descriptions. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their information, they use historical terms and concepts and incorporate relevant sources.






Relevant prior curriculum

Curriculum working towards

The Queensland SOSE Essential Learnings by the end of Year 5

Knowledge and understanding

Time, continuity and change

  • British colonisation of Australia is connected with particular events and changes, including European exploration, the landing of the First Fleet, proclamation of terra nullius, establishment of penal and free settlements, contact with the Indigenous population and the development of industries

  • Individuals and groups have made significant contributions to change and maintain Australian communities, heritages and identities

  • Events can be viewed differently according to a range of cultural, gender and socioeconomic viewpoints

Culture and identity

  • Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people have distinctive social organisation, languages and lifestyles

Ways of working

  • pose and refine questions for investigations

  • plan investigations based on questions and inquiry models

  • collect and organise information and evidence

  • evaluate sources of information and evidence to determine different perspectives, and distinguish facts from opinions

  • draw and justify conclusions based on information and evidence

  • communicate descriptions, decisions and conclusions, using text types selected to match audience and purpose

  • share opinions, identify possibilities and propose actions to respond to findings

  • apply strategies to influence decisions or behaviours and to contribute to groups

  • reflect on and identify personal actions and those of others to clarify values associated with social justice, the democratic process, sustainability and peace

  • reflect on learning to identify new understandings and future applications.

Year 7 Australian Curriculum: History

The Ancient World

  • The Year 7 curriculum provides a study of history from the time of the earliest human communities to the end of the ancient period, approximately 60 000 BC (BCE) – c.650 AD (CE). It was a period defined by the development of cultural practices and organised societies. The study of the ancient world includes the discoveries (the remains of the past and what we know) and the mysteries (what we do not know) about this period of history, in a range of societies.

Historical Skills

Chronology, terms and concepts

  • Sequence historical events, developments and periods (ACHHS205)

  • Use historical terms and concepts (ACHHS206)

Historical questions and research

  • Identify a range of questions about the past to inform a historical inquiry (ACHHS207)

  • Identify and locate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods (ACHHS208)

Analysis and use of sources

  • Identify the origin and purpose of primary and secondary sources (ACHHS209)

  • Locate, compare, select and use information from a range of sources as evidence (ACHHS210)

  • Draw conclusions about the usefulness of sources (ACHHS211)

Perspectives and interpretations

  • Identify and describe points of view, attitudes and values in primary and secondary sources (ACHHS212)

Explanation and communication

  • Develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations that use evidence from a range of sources that are acknowledged (ACHHS213)

  • Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies (ACHHS214)

Bridging content

The SOSE Essential Learnings by the end of Year 7 do not explicitly address the contributions of individuals and groups so bridging learning experiences related to this concept may assist in developing student understanding.

Links to other learning areas

There is the possibility of linking the concepts and content in this unit to the remainder of the SOSE Essential Learnings content required to be taught when implementing the Australian Curriculum: History.

In the Australian Curriculum: English

  • Select, navigate and read texts for a range of purposes, applying appropriate text processing strategies and interpreting structural features, for example table of contents, glossary, chapters, headings and subheadings (ACELY1712)

  • Use comprehension strategies to interpret and analyse information and ideas, comparing content from a variety of textual sources including media and digital texts (ACELY1713)

  • Plan, rehearse and deliver presentations, selecting and sequencing appropriate content and multimodal elements for defined audiences and purposes, making appropriate choices for modality and emphasis (ACELY1710)

In the Australian Curriculum: Mathematics

  • Interpret and compare a range of data displays, including side-by-side column graphs for two categorical variables (ACMSP147)

  • Interpret secondary data presented in digital media and elsewhere (ACMSP148)

In the Australian Curriculum: Science

  • Important contributions to the advancement of science have been made by people from a range of cultures (ACSHE099)

  • Scientific understandings, discoveries and inventions are used to solve problems that directly affect peoples’ lives (ACSHE100)

  • With guidance, plan appropriate investigation methods to answer questions or solve problems (ACSIS103)

  • Construct and use a range of representations, including tables and graphs, to represent and describe observations, patterns or relationships in data using digital technologies as appropriate (ACSIS107)

  • Compare data with predictions and use as evidence in developing explanations (ACSIS221)

  • Communicate ideas, explanations and processes in a variety of ways, including multi-modal texts (ACSIS110)



Assessment

Make judgments

Describe the assessment

Teachers gather evidence to make judgments about the following characteristics of student work:

Understanding

  • explanations of the significance of individuals or groups in bringing about change

  • explanations of causes and effects of changes in society

Skills

  • development of questions to frame historical inquiry

  • location and comparison of information from a range of sources to answer inquiry questions, and identification and explanation of points of view

  • communication of texts that incorporate relevant sources and use historical terms and concepts

For further advice and guidelines on constructing guides to making judgments refer to the Learning area standard descriptors: www.qsa.qld.edu.au

Students are given opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge, skills and understanding across a range of assessments. The assessment is collated in student folios and allows for ongoing feedback to students on their learning.

Year 6 teachers make decisions about the length of time required to complete the tasks and the conditions under which the assessment is to be conducted.

The teaching and learning experiences throughout the term provide opportunities for students to develop the understanding and skills required to complete these assessments. As students engage with these learning experiences, the teacher can provide feedback on specific skills.

Research: Multimodal or digital presentation (Multimodal)

The purpose of this assessment is to make judgments about students’ abilities to research, collect, analyse and draw conclusions about historical sources.

Students gather information about the contributions of a significant individual or group to the development of Australian society.

Students develop a hypothesis or position about the significance of one of these individuals or groups and create and deliver a multimodal presentation.

Suggested conditions:


  • open

  • 2–3 mins.

For further advice and guidelines on conditions for assessment refer to Assessment: History on the QSA website: www.qsa.qld.edu.au



Teaching and learning

Supportive learning environment

Teaching strategies and learning experiences

Adjustments for needs of learners

Resources

Stories of groups of people who migrated to Australia (including from ONE Asian country) and the reasons they migrated, such as World War II and Australian migration programs since the war.

Students:



  • sequence historical events by using timelines to describe migration events

  • use historical terms and concepts related to migration

  • identify questions to inform an historical inquiry

  • locate information related to inquiry questions in a range of sources

  • identify key causes of migration to Australia at different phases in history

  • identify family members, acquaintances or community members who may have stories or artefacts related to migration

  • examine and discuss a range of sources to identify what they reveal about the past

  • discuss an example of a primary source of information about migration to Australia (an object, document, or a visit from a person with first-hand experience)

  • identify the difference between primary and secondary sources of information

  • compare evidence from different sources to identify common themes

  • identify and describe points of view, attitudes and values in sources

  • document findings and synthesise information into concise ideas and themes.

The contribution of individuals and groups, including Aboriginal people and/or Torres Strait Islanders and migrants, to the development of Australian society, for example in areas such as the economy, education, science, the arts, sport.

Students:



  • identify and develop key questions about immigration and experiences for different groups of people

  • use historical terms and concepts related to migration

  • identify questions to inform an historical inquiry

  • describe cultural practices related to family life, beliefs and customs of migrant groups and compare these with the communities in which they settled

  • investigate the role of specific cultural groups in Australia’s economic and social development

  • consider significant individuals and groups in Australian public life across a range of fields

  • examine and discuss a range of sources to identify what they reveal about the past

  • discuss an example of a primary source of information about migration to Australia (an object, document, or perhaps a visit from a person with first-hand experience)

  • identify the difference between primary and secondary sources of information

  • locate information related to inquiry questions in a range of sources

  • compare evidence from different sources to identify common themes

  • identify and describe points of view, attitudes and values in sources

  • document findings and synthesise information into concise ideas and themes

  • use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies.

Section 6 of the Disability Standards for Education (The Standards for Curriculum Development, Accreditation and Delivery) states that education providers, including class teachers, must take reasonable steps to ensure a course/program is designed to allow any student to participate and experience success in learning.

The Disability Standards for Education 2005 (Cwlth) is available from: select Human rights and anti-discrimination > Disability standards for education.




Students would benefit from access to:

  • primary and secondary sources to
    (a) investigate migration to Australia, and
    (b) compare various models of communicating historical information.

Useful websites

Using primary sources


Success Stories of Australian Migration


Immigration stories


/Exhibitions/Immigration/Pages/default.aspx>

Cuc Lam's Suitcase


Migrant Stories




Guest speakers

  • A person with first-hand experience of migration to Australia.



Use feedback

Ways to monitor learning and assessment

Teachers meet to collaboratively plan the teaching, learning and assessment to meet the needs of all learners in each unit.

Teachers create opportunities for discussion about levels of achievement to develop shared understandings; co-mark or cross mark at key points to ensure consistency of judgments; and participate in moderating samples of student work at school or cluster level to reach consensus and consistency.



Feedback to students

Teachers strategically plan opportunities and ways to provide ongoing feedback (both written and informal) and encouragement to students on their strengths and areas for improvement.

Students reflect on and discuss with their teachers or peers what they can do well and what they need to improve.



Teachers reflect on and review learning opportunities to incorporate specific learning experiences and provide multiple opportunities for students to experience, practise and improve.

Reflection on the unit plan

Identify what worked well during and at the end of the unit, including:

  • activities that worked well and why

  • activities that could be improved and how

  • assessment that worked well and why

  • assessment that could be improved and how

  • common student misconceptions that need, or needed, to be clarified.




Queensland Studies Authority October 2012 |


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