Year 5 unit overview — Australian Curriculum: History



Download 60.45 Kb.
Date25.04.2016
Size60.45 Kb.

Year 5 unit overview — Australian Curriculum: History


Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), Australian Curriculum v3.0: History for Foundation–10, .

School name

Unit title

Duration of unit

Our School

Investigating the colonial period in Australia

20 hours




Unit outline

The Year 5 curriculum provides a study of colonial Australia in the 1800s. Students look at the founding of British colonies and the development of a colony. They learn about what life was like for different groups of people in the colonial period. They examine significant events and people, political and economic developments, social structures, and settlement patterns.

In this unit students identify how colonisation impacted upon communities.



There is a strong focus in this unit on the use of the historical skills. The students will explicitly focus on:

  • sequencing significant historical events

  • using historical terms

  • posing an investigation question to inform an historical inquiry

  • identifying sources and different points of view

  • using a range of communication forms and digital technologies.

The key inquiry questions for the unit are:

  • What were the significant events and who were the significant people that shaped Australian colonies?

  • What do we know about the lives of people in Australia’s colonial past and how do we know?



Identify curriculum

Content descriptions to be taught

General capabilities and crosscurriculum priorities

Historical Knowledge and Understanding

Historical Skills

Historical Knowledge and Understanding

The Australian Colonies

  • The impact of a significant development or event on a colony; for example, frontier conflict, the gold rushes, the Eureka Stockade, internal exploration, the advent of rail, the expansion of farming, drought (ACHHK095)

  • The reasons people migrated to Australia from Europe and Asia, and the experiences and contributions of a particular migrant group within a colony (ACHHK096)

Chronology, terms and concepts

  • Sequence historical people and events (ACHHS098)

  • Use historical terms and concepts (ACHHS099)

Historical questions and research

  • Identify questions to inform an historical inquiry (ACHHS100)

  • Identify and locate a range of relevant sources (ACHHS101)

Analysis and use of sources

  • Locate information related to inquiry questions in a range of sources (ACHHS102)

  • Compare information from a range of sources (ACHHS103)

Perspectives and interpretations

  • Identify points of view in the past and present (ACHHS104)

Explanation and communication

  • Develop texts, particularly narratives and descriptions, which incorporate source materials (ACHHS105)

  • Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies (ACHHS106)

description: gc_literacy Literacy

Use historical terms related to the unit and pose questions about the past



description: gc_numeracy Numeracy

Compile an annotated timeline to show key stages in the development of colonial Australia



description: gc_ict ICT capability

Use a range of digital technologies to find material relevant to an inquiry



description: gc_critical Critical and creative thinking

Examine sources of evidence to identify similarities and/or differences and describe what they reveal about the past



description: gc_personal_social Personal and social capability

Exchange information and foster a collaborative response



description: gc_intercultural Intercultural understanding

Investigate colonial life to discover what life was like at that time for a range of different inhabitants



Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

Explore daily life for Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people during this time



description: cc_sust Sustainability

Investigate the impact of settlement on the environment



Historical Understanding

This unit provides opportunities for students to develop historical understandings particularly focused on the key concepts of:

Sources

Written or non-written materials that can be used to investigate the past. A source becomes “evidence” if it is of value to a particular inquiry.

Continuity and change

Continuities are aspects of the past that have remained the same over certain periods of time. Changes are events or developments from the past that represent modifications, alterations and transformations.

Cause and effect

The relationship between a factor or set of factors (cause/s) and consequence/s (effect/s). These form sequences of events and developments over time.


Perspectives

A point of view or position from which events are seen and understood, and influenced by age, gender, culture, social position and beliefs and values.

Empathy

An understanding of the past from the point of view of the participant/s, including an appreciation of the circumstances faced, and the motivations, values and attitudes behind actions.

Significance

The importance that is assigned to particular aspects of the past, such as events, developments, movements and historical sites, and includes an examination of the principles behind the selection of what should be investigated and remembered.

Achievement standard

By the end of Year 5, students identify the causes and effects of change on particular communities, and describe aspects of the past that remained the same. They describe the different experiences of people in the past. They describe the significance of people and events in bringing about change.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, using timelines. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They identify a range of sources and locate and record information related to this inquiry. They examine sources to identify points of view. Students develop, organise and present their texts, particularly narratives and descriptions, using historical terms and concepts.






Relevant prior curriculum

Curriculum working towards

The Queensland SOSE Essential Learnings by the end of Year 5

Knowledge and understanding

Time, continuity and change

  • British colonisation of Australia is connected with particular events and changes, including European exploration, the landing of the First Fleet, proclamation of terra nullius, establishment of penal and free settlements, contact with the Indigenous population and the development of industries.

  • Individuals and groups have made significant contributions to change and maintain Australian communities, heritages and identities

  • Events can be viewed differently according to a range of cultural, gender and socioeconomic viewpoints

Ways of working

  • pose and refine questions for investigations

  • plan investigations based on questions and inquiry models

  • collect and organise information and evidence

  • evaluate sources of information and evidence to determine different perspectives, and distinguish facts from opinions

  • draw and justify conclusions based on information and evidence

  • communicate descriptions, decisions and conclusions, using text types selected to match audience and purpose

  • share opinions, identify possibilities and propose actions to respond to findings

  • apply strategies to influence decisions or behaviours and to contribute to groups

  • reflect on and identify personal actions and those of others to clarify values associated with social justice, the democratic process, sustainability and peace

  • reflect on learning to identify new understandings and future applications.

Year 6 Australian Curriculum: History

Historical Knowledge and Understanding

Australia as a Nation

  • Key figures and events that led to Australia’s Federation, including British and American influences on Australia’s system of law and government (ACHHK113)

  • Experiences of Australian democracy and citizenship, including the status and rights of Aboriginal people and/or Torres Strait Islanders, migrants, women, and children (ACHHK114)

  • Stories of groups of people who migrated to Australia (including from ONE Asian country) and the reasons they migrated, such as World War II and Australian migration programs since the war (ACHHK115)

  • The contribution of individuals and groups, including Aboriginal people and/or Torres Strait Islanders and migrants, to the development of Australian society, for example in areas such as the economy, education, science, the arts, sport (ACHHK116)

Historical Skills

Chronology, terms and concepts

  • Sequence historical people and events (ACHHS117)

  • Use historical terms and concepts (ACHHS118)

Historical questions and research

  • Identify questions to inform an historical inquiry (ACHHS119)

  • Identify and locate a range of relevant sources (ACHHS120)

Analysis and use of sources

  • Locate information related to inquiry questions in a range of sources (ACHHS121)

  • Compare information from a range of sources (ACHHS122)

Perspectives and interpretations

  • Identify points of view in the past and present (ACHHS123)







Explanation and communication

  • Develop texts, particularly narratives and descriptions, which incorporate source materials (ACHHS124)

  • Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies (ACHHS125)

Bridging content

The SOSE Essential Learnings by the end of Year 7 addressed the impact of a significant development or event on a colony and the reasons people migrated to Australia so bridging learning experiences related to this concept may assist in developing student understanding.

Links to other learning areas

There is the possibility of linking the concepts and content in this unit to the remainder of the SOSE Essential Learnings content required to be taught when implementing the Australian Curriculum: History.

In the Australian Curriculum: English

  • Navigate and read texts for specific purposes applying appropriate text processing strategies, for example predicting and confirming, monitoring meaning, skimming and scanning (ACELY1702)

  • Plan, draft and publish imaginative, informative and persuasive print and multimodal texts, choosing text structures, language features, images and sound appropriate to purpose and audience (ACELY1704)

  • Use comprehension strategies to analyse information, integrating and linking ideas from a variety of print and digital sources (ACELY1703)

In the Australian Curriculum: Mathematics

  • Use a grid reference system to describe locations. Describe routes using landmarks and directional language (ACMMG113)

  • Describe and interpret different data sets in context (ACMSP120)

In the Australian Curriculum: Science

  • Communicate ideas, explanations and processes in a variety of ways, including multi-modal texts (ACSIS093)






Assessment

Make judgments

Describe the assessment

Teachers gather evidence to make judgments about the following characteristics of student work:

Understanding

  • explanations of causes and effects of changes in society

  • explanations of the significance of individuals or groups in bringing about change

  • descriptions of the different experiences of people in the past

Skills

  • sequencing of events and people in chronological order using representations of time

  • development of questions to frame historical inquiry

  • location and comparison of information from a range of sources to answer inquiry questions, and identification and explanation of points of view

  • communication of texts that incorporate relevant sources and use historical terms and concepts

For further advice and guidelines on constructing guides to making judgments refer to the Learning area standard descriptors: www.qsa.qld.edu.au

Students are given opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge, skills and understanding across a range of assessments. The assessment is collated in student folios and allows for ongoing feedback to students on their learning.

Year 5 teachers make decisions about the length of time required to complete the tasks and the conditions under which the assessment is to be conducted.

The teaching and learning experiences throughout the term provide opportunities for students to develop the understanding and skills required to complete these assessments. As students engage with these learning experiences, the teacher can provide feedback on specific skills.

Collection of work (Written, spoken/signed, multimodal)

The purpose of this assessment is to make judgments about students’ responses to a series of focused tasks within a specified context and based on the process of historical inquiry.

The focus of the collection of work is on the reasons people migrated to Australia from Europe and Asia and could include:


  • written explanations

  • questions of, and responses to, source material

  • labelled maps/diagrams

  • annotated timelines

  • annotated photographs

  • journal entries.

Suggested conditions:

  • open.




Research: Presentation (Multimodal)

The purpose of this assessment is to make judgments about students’ abilities to research, collect, analyse and draw conclusions about historical sources.

Students explore a significant development or event that shaped the Australian colonies.

They examine the impact of this development or event on a colony and create and deliver a multimodal presentation.

Suggested conditions:



  • open

  • 2–3 minutes.

For further advice and guidelines on conditions for assessment refer to Assessment advice: History on the QSA website: www.qsa.qld.edu.au






Teaching and learning

Supportive learning environment

Teaching strategies and learning experiences

Adjustments for needs of learners

Resources

The reasons people migrated to Australia from Europe and Asia, and the experiences and contributions of a particular migrant group within a colony

Students:



  • investigate the reasons for people migrating to Australia from Europe and Asia

  • identify questions to inform an historical inquiry into the migration of people to Australia and the experiences and contributions of migrants within a colony

  • use historical terms related to the migration of people to Australia

  • sequence significant historical events showing key stages in the development of colonial Australia

  • identify and locate a range of relevant sources, e.g. understanding the internet domains names “com”, “edu”, “gov” as indicators of the provenance of a source.

The impact of a significant development or event on a colony; for example, frontier conflict, the gold rushes, the Eureka Stockade, internal exploration, the advent of rail, the expansion of farming, drought

Students:



  • investigate a significant event or development on a colony

  • explain the event or development’s economic, social and political impact on a colony

  • use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies to create and edit a presentation that records and explains the past

  • use historical terms related significant events and developments in Australian colonies

  • identify and locate a range of relevant sources, e.g. understanding the internet domains names “com”, “edu”, “gov” as indicators of the provenance of a source.

Section 6 of the Disability Standards for Education (The Standards for Curriculum Development, Accreditation and Delivery) states that education providers, including class teachers, must take reasonable steps to ensure a course/program is designed to allow any student to participate and experience success in learning.

The Disability Standards for Education 2005 (Cwlth) is available from: select Human rights and anti-discrimination > Disability standards for education.




Students would benefit from access to:

  • Search engines, museum and library catalogues and indexes to find material relevant to inquiry such as stories, songs, diaries, official documents and artworks

  • excursions to a local cemetery to survey graves for clues about the patterns of settlement, ages and causes of death in the local area.






Use feedback

Ways to monitor learning and assessment

Teachers meet to collaboratively plan the teaching, learning and assessment to meet the needs of all learners in each unit.

Teachers create opportunities for discussion about levels of achievement to develop shared understandings; co-mark or cross mark at key points to ensure consistency of judgments; and participate in moderating samples of student work at school or cluster level to reach consensus and consistency.



Feedback to students

Teachers strategically plan opportunities and ways to provide ongoing feedback (both written and informal) and encouragement to students on their strengths and areas for improvement.

Students reflect on and discuss with their teachers or peers what they can do well and what they need to improve.



Teachers reflect on and review learning opportunities to incorporate specific learning experiences and provide multiple opportunities for students to experience, practise and improve.

Reflection on the unit plan

Identify what worked well during and at the end of the unit, including:

  • activities that worked well and why

  • activities that could be improved and how

  • assessment that worked well and why

  • assessment that could be improved and how

  • common student misconceptions that need, or needed, to be clarified.




Queensland Studies Authority October 2012 |



Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page