Year 3 to 4 classroom resources First Steps



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Year 3 to 4 classroom resources

First Steps


Teacher Support Resources > Years 3 - 4 First Steps

Page Content

​First Step resources are introductory activities that support students’ development of the Intercultural Understanding general capability. Students are introduced to issues of identity, culture and diversity in Australia.


Alignment to the curriculum

Intercultural understanding


Students identify and describe variability within and across cultural groups and identify ways of reaching understanding between culturally diverse groups. For more information, see: the Australian curriculum intercultural understanding learning continuum

History


Students investigate the diversity and longevity of Australia’s first peoples and the ways Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples are connected to country and place (land, sea, waterways and skies) and the implications for their daily lives. For more information, see: AusVELS history domain

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures


Students learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ ways of life are uniquely expressed through ways of being, knowing, thinking and doing; Australia acknowledges the significant contributions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people locally and globally. For more information, see: AusVELS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

Engage


Use the film clip Tiwi Music: Keeping an ancient culture alive to introduce students to the importance to Indigenous Australians of passing ancient traditions on through the generations. For more information, see: Tiwi Music: Keeping an ancient culture alive

Then ask students to reflect on some of the ancient traditions that are continued in their families or community.

Connect this emphasis on keeping traditions alive to traditional games played by Indigenous Australians for hundreds of years. Introduce students to the Aboriginal word 'Yulunga', which means ‘playing.’ Locate the resource, Yulunga Traditional Games. For more information, see: Yulunga Traditional Games 

Inform students that they will play a number of games traditionally played by Indigenous peoples from different areas of Australia, for example, the games of Riawena (Tasmania); Puldjungi (Victoria); Wulijini (Bathurst Island); Aurukun (North Queensland).

First, locate the areas on a map of Australia where these games were played. Describe the basic features of each game and how they would have been played in the past. Explain to students that you will teach an adapted form of each game.

Connect


After playing the games, ask students to reflect on some of the similarities between these and the games they play.

Introduce students to Marn Grook, the traditional Indigenous game that has close links to Australian Rules Football (AFL). Use the film Marn Grook to open up a discussion about the influence of Marn Grook on AFL. For more information, see: Marn Grook

Also show students an image of a possum skin football used in the game of Marn Grook. For more information, see: Marn Grook possum skin football

Play the game Marn Grook. For more information, see: Marn Grook instructions


Reflect


Invite students to reflect on the game they have played and to consider the similarities and differences between Marn Grook and AFL.

Build on the discussion of the influence of Marn Grook to explore the contributions of Indigenous players to the AFL.

Show students the film clip, AFL & The Indigenous Community. For more information, see: AFL & The Indigenous Community

Encourage students to reflect on the skills and attitudes that Indigenous players bring to Australian Rules Football.

Ask students to complete a final reflection on their learning and how their thinking has changed. Use the visible thinking routine, I used to think… Now I think... for this task. For more information, see: I used to think… Now I think...

Further ideas


For more information, see:

Visible Thinking – provides resources and information on visible thinking routines.


Exploring Deeper


Teacher Support Resources > Year 3 - 4 Exploring Deeper

Page Content

Exploring Deeper resources are learning sequences that support students’ development of the Intercultural Understanding general capability. Students explore issues of identity, culture and diversity in Australia.


Alignment to the curriculum

Intercultural understanding


Students identify and describe variability within and across cultural groups and identify ways of reaching understanding between culturally diverse groups. For more information, see: the Australian curriculum intercultural understanding learning continuum

English


Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. The range of literary texts comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from and about Asia.

Students discuss literary experiences with others, sharing responses and expressing a point of view.

Students create literary texts by developing storylines, characters and settings.

For more information, see: AusVELS English domain


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures


Students learn that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have unique belief systems and are spiritually connected to the land, sea, sky and waterways.

Students learn that the broader Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies encompass a diversity of nations across Australia. For more information, see: AusVELS Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures


Engage


Before commencing this focus on Indigenous Dreamtime, consult the background information provided in The Dreaming, located on the Australian Government website. For more information, see: The Dreaming

Then introduce students to several classic Dreamtime stories, such as: 



  • The Rainbow Serpent (Dick Roughsey)

  • Tiddalik, the Frog (Barbara Ker Wilson and Jan Holloway)

  • The Quinkins (Percy Tresize and Dick Roughsey)

Explain to students the significance of the Dreamtime to Indigenous Australians. Read through each story and reinforce students’ understanding that Dreamtime stories are particular to place (desert, rivers, mountains, rainforests, sea) and location (states and territories).

Ask students to provide a personal response to the stories:



  • What was your favourite story/stories and why?

  • Which was the most interesting character/s?

  • What could be another title for each story?

Revisit the texts, reinforcing how these stories are passed on through generations of Indigenous people to stress the importance of relationships between the land, animals and people.

Shift the focus to the Dreamtime stories important to Indigenous Victorians. Ask students to view the interview with prominent Indigenous elder, Joy Murphy Wandin, who speaks of the importance of Bunjil the Eagle. For more information, see: Bunjil the Eagle

Ask students to recall where they may have seen Bunjil the Eagle, the creator ancestor for Melbourne.

Conduct an internet search and show them an image of the sculpture located at the Docklands. Show other artistic representations of Bunjil:



  • A geoglyph. For more information, see: Bunjil geoglyph

  • Kinetic sculpture. For more information, see: Bunjil kinetic sculpture

  • For shared reading, use the Big Book, Bunjil the Eagle, A story from Jaara Community. For more information, see: Bunjil the Eagle (Pearson)

Invite students to retell the story of Bunjil in writing and to share their retelling with the whole class.

Explain


Support students to analyse the common features of Indigenous Dreamtime stories:

  • Characters

  • Setting

  • Story elements such as a complication or a resolution

  • Purpose

Compile a table, listing students’ responses. 

Then ask students to consider:

What do these stories teach us about the importance of the Dreamtime to Indigenous Australians?

What do these stories teach us? For example, care for the land and animals; the things that are sacred to Indigenous Australians; the ancient connection that Indigenous Australians have to the land.


Create


Use the Sharing Stories website to further explore some of the themes and motifs used by Indigenous Australians to tell their Dreamtime stories. For more information, see: Sharing Stories

Ask students to watch the videos and notice how young Indigenous children tell the Dreamtime stories particular to where they were born.

Invite students to share their observations.

Revisit students’ learning about the Dreamtime stories of the Wurundjeri people of Victoria. Ask students to create their own Dreamtime stories, drawing on the land, animals and people of their local area.

Inform them they will publish their stories using digital technology, such as simple Power Point or Movie Maker. ​For more information, see: Digital Stories


  • Students draft a Dreamtime story and conference this prior to creating their digital story.

  • Students consider the kinds of artwork, props, voiceover they will need to present their story.

Invite students to present their stories to the class. Encourage students to visit other classrooms and present their stories.

Extend


Encourage students to conduct some research to find out about the Indigenous peoples who are local to where they live. Invite students to share their findings with the whole class.

Invite a guest speaker to tell students about the Dreamtime stories associated with the local community.


Further ideas


For more information, see:

Aboriginal storytelling - provides background information on the cultural significance of Dreamtime stories.

Indigenous tales of the Dreamtime - a blog entry that provides information on children’s literature by renowned educator, Trevor Cairney.

Engaging with Challenging Issues


Teacher Support Resources > Year 3 - 4 Engaging with Challenging Issues

Page Content

Engaging with Challenging Issues resources are inquiry-based units of work that support students’ development of the Intercultural Understanding general capability. Students investigate some of the challenges associated with issues of identity, culture and diversity in Australia.


Alignment to the curriculum

Intercultural understanding


Students identify and describe variability within and across cultural groups and identify ways of reaching understanding between culturally diverse groups. For more information, see: the Australian curriculum intercultural understanding learning continuum

Civics and citizenship


Students learn about some key events which contributed to the development of the Australian nation. They explore symbols and celebrations of Australia’s and Victoria’s past and present; for example, the Australian national flag, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags, the Victorian flag, coats of arms, floral emblems, colours, flower, animal and bird emblems, the national anthem, Australia Day and the Queen’s Birthday. They consider the meaning and values that are reflected in these celebrations and symbols. They consider what they value about Australia. ​For more information, see: AusVELS Civics and Citizenship domain

Engage


Before viewing the film clip Full on Aussies, inform students that they will need to listen and view carefully and take notes. For more information, see: Full on Aussies

Students may need to view the film clip several times so they have time to actively listen and engage with the ideas presented to them. You may wish to provide students with a handout for this task, using the headings below as a guide.



  • Key words

  • Key ideas

  • Important images

After viewing, ask students to work in small groups to discuss their observations and share their thinking. Then invite them to synthesise their discussion using one statement. Provide some examples to make the task clear. For example, Australia Day is a time to celebrate the good life we all enjoy; On Australia day, people reflect on what it means to be Australian.

Provide students with a definition of the term identity, their individuality; their character; their self; their uniqueness/similarities.

Introduce students to the inquiry-learning questions:


  • How do Australians symbolise their identity as a nation?

  • How do Australians celebrate their identity?

  • What do you value about being Australian?

You may wish to display these on a wonder wall and invite students to write down their own questions to add to the wall.

Record their wonderings and responses to questions throughout the unit of work.


Explore


Remind students of the reference in the film clip to Full On Aussies. Ask them to write down what they think this quote means and how the quote reflects what they learnt about Australia Day from the film clip. For more information, see: Full on Aussies

Then divide students into groups of four.  Each group decides on four roles - a leader, recorder, timekeeper and presenter. Use the handout from the Read Write Think website to encourage students to use the language of co-operation for this task. ​For more information, see: Read Write Think handout

Ask students to write down answers to the questions that follow (adapted from We are Australian: unit of work). For more information, see: We are Australian: unit of work


  • What do Australians look like?

  • What is/are the language/s of Australia?

  • What religions and customs do they practise?

  • What work and activities do Australians like to do?

  • What do Australians like to celebrate?

  • What do Australians believe in and value as people?

Invite the presenter from each group to share the group’s answers with the whole class. Encourage students to give ‘warm’ constructive feedback to each group. ​For more information, see:  Assessment for learning: warm and cool feedback

Inform students that they will create a mural titled Australians: Celebrations, Symbols and Values. Invite them to draw an image/s they wish to place on the mural that reflects some aspect of the title.  They might like to write a brief caption to accompany their image.

Students can add to this mural as they develop further understandings about Australian national identity, the symbols and celebrations that represent this and the things they value about being Australian. 

Explore more deeply some of the symbols and celebrations that reflect Australia and Australian people.


Process


  • Introduce students to the focus of investigation, for example, Australia Day.

  • Ask them to reflect on what they know about this focus.

  • Advise students to reflect on the meanings of each celebration or symbol.

  • Show the film clip, image, or listen to the audio recording of each focus.

  • Ask students to write down or draw what they see and hear.

For this activity use these films and major sporting events.

For more information, see:

What's Australia Day all about? – investigates different perspectives on Australia Day and how people commemorate it.

A Flag for the Nation – provides an activity to explore flags that have been used in Australia.

Our National Flag... Since 1901 – provides teacher notes for Our National Flag... Since 1901.

The Meaning of ANZAC Day – shares the thoughts and feelings of five people, of varying ages, about ANZAC Day.

National Anthem (Choir) – provides an audio recording of the Australian National Anthem.

Coat of Arms and Floral Emblems – provides links for information and pictures to the Australian Coat of Arms, Floral Emblems and other national symbols.

Australian Football League – provides resources and a guide to assist you to understand the essential elements of the game.

Australia at the Olympic Games – provides information, news and resources on the Olympic Games and the Australian Olympic Teams.

Then ask students to work in groups of four. Allocate each group one of the celebrations or symbols they have been introduced to. Invite them to research more about this celebration or symbol.

Explain


Encourage students to present their findings to the class using digital technology such as PowerPoint or Photo Story. Use this guide to assist you. ​For more information, see: Digital Stories

Return to the class mural and ask students to reflect on their new learning. Invite them to add to the mural a picture that represents their deeper understanding of how Australians celebrate and symbolise what is important to them.

Then ask students to write a report on what they have learnt about celebrations and symbols and how they represent aspects of Australia’s national identity, past and present. Invite students to focus on the celebration or symbol they have researched and to explain its significance. Encourage students to think about the audience for this report as people who have recently arrived in Australia and who need to learn more about the meanings and value of celebrations and symbols.

Provide questions such as the following to guide students’ writing: 



  • What is the meaning of this celebration or symbol?

  • Why is this celebration or symbol important to Australia?

  • What does this celebration or symbol tell us about Australia’s past?

  • What does this celebration or symbol tell us about Australia’s present?

Invite students to publish their reports and collate these into a class book.

Elaborate


Investigate the significance of becoming an Australian citizen – as a celebration and as a symbol of unity and diversity. Use this background information from the Immigration Museum, Victoria to assist you in guiding this exploration. For more information, see: Australian Citizenship

Return to the film clip, Full on Aussies and highlight the citizenship ceremonies. Explain to students the legal process of becoming an Australian citizen and compare this to automatic citizenship through birth. For more information, see: Full on Aussies

Ask students to reflect on this statement: All the people who are becoming Australian citizens appear to be very happy and eager to join the Australian community.

Introduce students to some stories of people who have become Australians. Select stories from the Australian Government website to share with the class. For more information, see: Stories, Immigration Australia

Ask students to consider:


  • What is similar about these stories?

  • How do you think these new citizens feel about becoming an Australian citizen?

  • What do these people value about being Australian?

Encourage students to think about values common to Australian people. Use this list as a start:

  • Care and compassion

  • Doing your best

  • Fair go

  • Freedom

  • Honesty and trustworthiness

  • Integrity

  • Respect

  • Responsibility

  • Understanding

  • Inclusion

  • Valuing diversity

Invite students to make connections between these values and what they have learnt about Australian celebrations and symbols. Use a graphic organiser such as a web for this task. For more information, see:  Webs graphic organiser

Encourage students to write a reflection on what is the most important thing to them about being Australian and to draw a symbol that represents their thoughts and feelings.

Ask students to share their reflections with the whole class.

Show students various examples of how Australians celebrate diversity:



  • Harmony Day
    For more information, see: Harmony Day

  • Moomba Festival
    For more information, see: Moomba Festival

  • One Team, One Goal: Celebrating Diversity competition
    For more information, see: One Team, One Goal: Celebrating Diversity competition

Extend students’ thinking by posing the questions: How do we celebrate Australia’s diversity as a nation? Why is this important?

Invite students to create an art piece such as a painting or collage that symbolises and celebrates Australia as a culturally diverse nation.

Display students’ artwork in the classroom.

The artworks could be submitted as an entry in the One Team, One Goal: Celebrating Diversity competition. For more information, see: 2015 One Team, One Goal: Celebrating Diversity competition


Evaluate


Return to the inquiry learning questions set at the beginning of the unit. Also review the questions posed by students.

  • How do Australians symbolise their identity as a nation?

  • How do Australians celebrate their identity?

  • What do you value about being Australian?

Engage students in a discussion about their learning. What have we discovered in answer to these questions? Are any of our questions left unanswered?

Set students a summative assessment task and provide them with a rubric for the task. Use the model provided here and adapt for your purpose. For more information, see: Assessment for Learning: Strategies to enhance peer feedback


Task


Invite students to create an information kit to give to newly arrived migrants to Australia that explains:

  • Australian celebrations, what they mean and why they are important.

  • Australian symbols, what they mean and why they are important.

  • The things that Australians value and why.

  • What is means to be an Australian – the common beliefs and values that keep Australians together.

  • Australian citizenship and why this is important to people.

Further ideas


For more information, see:

We are Australian: Unit of work – provides a unit of work on Australian identity.

Values Education for Australian Schooling – provides additional information and resources on Australian values.

Civics and Citizenship Education – provides additional resources on citizenship.

Getting to Know Others – provides additional resources on citizenship.

Assessment for Learning – provides a deeper understanding of assessment for learning strategies.  




Resources for exploring diversity and developing intercultural understanding in the classroom May 2015




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