Year 2 unit overview — Australian Curriculum: Geography



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Year 2 unit overview — Australian Curriculum: Geography


Source: Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), Australian Curriculum v5.0 Geography for Foundation–10, www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Geography/Curriculum/F-10.

Unit no.

Unit title

Duration of unit

2

Connections between people and places

10 hours




Unit outline

The Year 2 curriculum involves children developing their understanding of other places and how people are connected to different places.

In this unit, children will develop their understanding of the ways in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples maintain special connections to particular Country/Place; and the connections of people in Australia to other places in Australia; the countries of Asia region, and across the world. The children will develop and understanding of the influence of purpose, distance and accessibility on the frequency with which people visit places.

Children’s’ mental map of the world and their understanding of place are further developed through learning the major geographical divisions on Earth and where they are located in relation to Australia.

This unit provides opportunities for field work that is an essential component of geographical learning. In this unit, the children will be involved in observing and recording of information in the classroom and at home. The children will develop their use of spatial technologies by collecting data by observing, counting, interviewing and asking questions, reading maps, annotating maps, record sheets and tally sheets.

There is a strong focus in this unit on the use of geographical inquiry and skills. The children will:

interview parents or significant others to collect and record data about how he or she is connect to others;

represent the data they collected on a Google map and photos

interpret the information they collected to describe places that they are connect to and how purpose, distance and accessibility influence the frequency with which why people visit places

present findings and reflect their findings in different texts such as written, oral and digital technologies.

The inquiry questions for the unit are:

How are people connected to their place and other places?

What factors affect my connections to places?





Identify curriculum

Content descriptions to be taught

General capabilities
and crosscurriculum priorities


Geographical Knowledge and Understanding

Geographical Inquiry and Skills

The ways in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples maintain special connections to particular Country/Place (ACHGK011)

The connections of people in Australia to other places in Australia, the countries of the Asia region, and across the world (ACHGK012)

The influence of purpose, distance and accessibility on the frequency with which people visit places (ACHGK013)


Observing, questioning and planning

Pose geographical questions about familiar and unfamiliar places (ACHGS013)



Collecting, recording, evaluating and representing

Collect and record geographical data and information, for example, by observing, by interviewing, or from sources such as, photographs, plans, satellite images, story books and films (ACHGS014)

Represent data and the location of places and their features by constructing tables, plans and labelled maps (ACHGS015)

Interpreting, analysing and concluding

Draw conclusions based on the interpretation of geographical information sorted into categories (ACHGS016)



Communicating

Present findings in a range of communication forms, for example, written, oral, digital and visual, and describe the direction and location of places, using terms such as north, south, opposite, near, far (ACHGS017)



Reflecting and responding

Reflect on their learning and suggest responses to their findings (ACHGS018)



The application of the general capabilities and cross-curriculum priorities in this include may include:

Literacy

Use a story map to describe connections to a place



Numeracy

Use directional terms such as north and south to describe locations



ICT capability

Use satellite images to identify the scale of different places



Critical and creative thinking

Draw conclusions about why connections between places have changed over time



Personal and social capability

Interview family members about places they have visited



Intercultural understanding

Explore the continents of the world and the people who love therein relation to Australia



Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures

Identify the connections of the local Aboriginal peoples or Torres Strait Islander peoples with the land, sea or animals









Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia

Compare the connections of people in Australia to countries in the Asian region




Geographical understandings

The unit provides opportunities for children to develop geographical understandings that are particularly focused on the following concepts.

Place

Space

Environment

Interconnection

Scale

Explanations of these geographical concepts for Prep to Year 2 are provided in the QSA Year level plans, available at
www.qsa.qld.edu.au/yr2-geography-resources.html > Curriculum > Planning templates and exemplars > Year level plans, and in the Appendix.

Achievement standard

By the end of Year 2, students identify the features that define places and recognise that places can be described at different scales. They describe how people in different places are connected to each other and identify factors that influence these connections. Students recognise that the world can be divided into major geographical divisions. They explain why places are important to people.

Students pose questions about familiar and unfamiliar places and collect information to answer these questions. They represent data and the location of places and their features in tables, plans and on labelled maps. They interpret geographical information to draw conclusions. Students present findings in a range of texts and use simple geographical terms to describe the direction and location of places. They suggest action in response to the findings of their inquiry.






Relevant prior curriculum

Curriculum working towards

The Queensland Studies of Society and Environment (SOSE) Essential Learnings by the end of Year 3

Knowledge and understanding

Culture and identity

Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples are Australia’s Indigenous peoples and their influences are evident and valued in Australian communities



Political and economic systems

Australians are connected to other people and places by shared interests, including travel, exchanging goods and services, and environmental issues



Ways of working

Students are able to:

pose questions for investigations

plan simple investigations based on questions

identify and collect information and evidence from narratives and familiar sources

make judgments about the usefulness of the information and evidence

draw conclusions and give explanations, using information and evidence

communicate social and environmental ideas, using texts and terminology to match audience and purpose

reflect on learning to identify new understandings.


Year 3 Australian Curriculum: Geography

Geographical Knowledge and Understanding

The many Countries/Places of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples throughout Australia (ACHGK015)

The location of Australia’s neighbouring countries and their diverse characteristics (ACHGK016)

Geographical Inquiry and Skills

Observing, questioning and planning

Develop geographical questions to investigate (ACHGS019)



Collecting, recording, evaluating and representing

Collect and record relevant geographical data and information, for example, by observing by interviewing, conducting surveys, measuring, or from sources such as maps, photographs, satellite images, the media and the internet (ACHGS020)

Represent data by constructing tables and graphs (ACHGS021)

Represent the location of places and their features by constructing large-scale maps that conform to cartographic conventions including scale, legend, title and north point, and describe their location using simple grid references, compass direction and distance (ACHGS022)



Interpreting, analysing and concluding

Interpret geographical data to identify distributions and patterns and draw conclusions (ACHGS023)



Communicating

Present findings in a range of communication forms, for example, written, oral, digital, graphic, tabular, and visual, and use geographical terminology (ACHGS024)



Reflecting and responding

Reflect on their learning to propose individual action in response to a contemporary geographical challenge and identify the expected effects of the proposal (ACHGS025)



Bridging content

The SOSE Essential Learnings by the end of Year 3 do not explicitly address the influence of distance and accessibility on the frequency of visits to places. Children are not required to identify that the world is identified by features, including location markers such as the Equator, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn and the continents, so bridging learning experiences related to these concepts may assist in developing children’s geographical understandings and skills.

Links to other learning areas

Geography is a subject in the Humanities and Social Sciences learning area and has connections to History, Civics and Citizenship, and Economics and Business. There are opportunities to connect learning experiences in Geography to other learning areas.

Australian Curriculum: History

Explore a point of view (ACHHS052)

Use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written, role play) and digital technologies (ACHHS054)

Australian Curriculum: Mathematics

Collect, check and classify data (ACMSP049)

Create displays of data using lists, table and picture graphs and interpret them (ACMSP050)

Australian Curriculum: Science

Use a range of methods to sort information, including drawings and provided tables (ACSIS040)

Compare observations with those of others (ACSIS041)

Australian Curriculum: English

Use comprehension strategies to build literal and inferred meaning and begin to analyse texts by drawing on growing knowledge of context, language and visual features and print and multimodal text structures (ACELY1670)

Construct texts featuring print, visual and audio elements using software, including word processing programs (ACELY1674)




Assessment

Make judgments

Describe the assessment

Teachers gather evidence to make judgments about the following characteristics of children’s work:

Understanding

Describe how people in different places are connected to each other

Identify factors that influence these connections.

Skills

Pose questions about familiar and unfamiliar places

Collect information to answer these questions

Represent data and the location of places and their features in tables and on labelled maps

Interpret geographical information to draw conclusions

Present findings in a range of texts and use simple geographical terms to describe the direction and location of places

The valued features of the standard elaborations targeted in this assessment are:

Geographical knowledge and understanding

Questioning and researching

Interpreting and analysing

Communicating

For further advice and guidelines on constructing task-specific standards, refer to the standards elaborations: www.qsa.qld.edu.au/26025.html > select the Year level > choose the Resources tab > Standards elaborations.



Guided research

The purpose of this assessment is to make judgments about children’s ability to observe, collect, record and represent geographical data and findings to demonstrate understanding of how people in different places are connected to each other, why places are important to them and how factors such as location and distance influence the connections.

Research in a P–2 context is guided. Guided research involves children and teachers collaborating to gather and record information. They follow an inquiry approach that aligns to the Geographical Inquiry and Skills strand for the Year 2 level.

Children will:

collaboratively construct a list of questions with their teacher to take home and interview a parent/carer or significant other to research places that are important to them. They can collect photos of places that are important to them

represent collected data on a local, Australian or world map (Google map or printed), labelling all of the places that are important to them

interpret and evaluate the data in terms of how they are connected to these places, why these places are important to them, and how factors such as location and distance influence the connections

communicate their map and findings to the whole class as a short multimodal presentation.

Refer to Australian Curriculum: Geography — Assessment categories, techniques and conditions: www.qsa.qld.edu.au/downloads/p_10/ac_geography_assess_advice.pdf




Teaching and learning

Teaching strategies and learning experiences

Supportive learning environment1

Resources

Across Prep–Year 2, there are several contexts for learning. The Focused teaching and learning and investigations contexts for learning are an explicit focus in Geography.

Adjustments for needs of learners


Children would benefit from access to:

a range of literary and non-literary texts related to features of transport, communication, places in the Asia region, and Aboriginal peoples’ or Torres Strait Islander peoples’ connections to Country/Place

a range of games and puzzles

digital resources about local and more distant places

spatial technologies, such as Google Earth or Google maps, simple maps, a globe, charts and diagrams to develop spatial awareness.

QSA, Dialogue circles: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspectives,

www.qsa.qld.edu.au/downloads/approach/indigenous_res_dialogue_circ.pdf

Map of Australia (using spatial technology if available)

Online world map, gmapgis.com

Google maps, maps.google.com.au




Context: Play

In socio-dramatic play spaces, provide opportunities for children to explore place with various place-based activity centres, e.g. home corner, beach, shop etc.

In exploratory play, provide source materials (e.g. photos of various places, transport and ways of connecting) for children to explore and discuss.

In manipulative play, provide blocks and manipulative materials for children to construct imaginative and real places and ways of connecting to those places.






Context: Routines

Provide opportunities for children to share their own view of place through dialogue circles in morning session times.






Context: Real-life situations

Invite guests (e.g. a grandparent or an overseas visitor) into the classroom to talk about different places and ways of connecting to places.

Use own family as a model for mapping connections to places and as a context for discussion.

Lead a class discussion on the places that children know, have been to or have come from around the world and mark these on a map for display.






Context: Teachable moment

Take opportunities to respond to the interests and experiences of individual children, small groups or the whole class in relation to their understanding of place and their connection to place.






Context: Focused teaching and learning and investigations

The focused teaching and learning and investigations experience allows children opportunities to build, revisit and contextualise their understandings of place and connections to place.









Session 1: The concept of place

Introduce to the children to the book Are We There Yet? This story will introduce the concept of place and visiting other places. A class discussion could include the following questions:

Where are some of the places that the characters visited? (Make reference to directional terms used in the book, such as north and south, and the various places in Australia.)

Why did the characters visit the places?

How did the characters visit the places?





Lester, A 2005, Are We There Yet?, Penguin, Sydney

QSA, Dialogue circles: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspectives,

www.qsa.qld.edu.au/downloads/approach/indigenous_res_dialogue_circ.pdf


Session 2: Places children connect with

Guide and model a response for a take-home task, where the children find places that are important and connected to them and mark them on a local map, e.g. Where do I live? What suburb do I live in? Have I lived anywhere else? What are some of the places that I visit?









Session 3: Sharing my place in a dialogue circle

Ask the children share their responses from the take-home task in a dialogue circle. Time constraints may limit turns for responses. Therefore, a dialogue circle may become a part of a daily morning session.

Introduce the process of dialogue circles as used by Aboriginal cultures and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Discuss the importance of the process in these cultures.

For an effective dialogue circle:

model and guide the process for the children

use a “powerful instrument”. The instrument should have a personal connection to the circle participants and be used to indicate the talker.






Queensland Museum, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures,

www.qm.qld.gov.au/Find+out+about/Aboriginal+and+Torres+Strait+Islander+Cultures

ABC, Indigenous Language Map, www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map


Session 4: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander connections to place

In this session, the children investigate the connections of the local Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples with their Country/Place.

Discuss and share with the children the maps associated with traditional Aboriginal groups and Torres Strait Islander groups. Each Indigenous language group has a defined area of land or country that they are connected to geographically and spiritually.

As a class, research famous Aboriginal identities, such as Kath Walker. Identify on the map the area or land that she would have identified with.

Ask the children to identify and recognise the land or country that Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples connect with in their area.





Aussie Educator, Famous Australians, www.aussieeducator.org.au/reference/general/famousaustralians.html

Session 5: Exploring how we connect to places in our local area

In this session, the children explore places in their own local area that they and class members identify with.

As a home task, guide the children to label a printed Google map or GmapGIS of places that they visit in a week. Each day, the children tally how they travel to these places (e.g. car, walking, train).

As a class, use Google maps to record a whole class map of places that the children visit. Use a table of tally marks to represent the frequency of places visited and how the children travelled there.

Lead a whole class discussion about the map and associated table. Ask: How frequently do we travel to places (e.g. the shop, church, park)? Why do we go to these places so often (e.g. for shopping, religion, recreation)?

As a class, discuss how transport helps us to get to and from these places.






Skype, www.skype.com

Session 6: How am I connected to place?

In this session, the children explore how they connect to places around Australia and how their connection with places is affected by transport and information and communications technology.

Refer back to the text Are we there yet? Explore the places that the family visit.

Ask the children to observe ways that they can connect with other places, e.g. using trains and planes as well as technology, such as email and Skype.

As a whole class collaborative task, observe and record the transport in the school location. Refer back to the story Are we there yet? and discuss how the children’s family and friends at home could continue connecting with them, e.g. using email and Skype.

Lead a discussion about connecting with people back home and come to a conclusion about how people’s connection with places is affected by transport and information and communication technology.






Baker, J 2010, Mirror, Walker Books, London.

Rippen, S 2006, Fang Fang’s Chinese New Year, Omnibus Books, Sydney.

Rawlins, D 1988, Digging to China, Scholastic, Sydney.

Baker, J 2002, Window, Walker Books, London.

Morgan, S 2002, Sally’s Story, ABC Books, Sydney.


Session 7: How am I connected to places the world?

In this session, the children explore how they and others are connected to the world.

Introduce the children to the text Mirror.

Explore how the two families are different but are still connected

Have the children use a world map to locate where Morocco is. Use directional terms, such as far away, north and south, and discuss that Morocco is in North Africa.





Grandparents/parents/carers/
significant elder

Session 8: How did people connect to places in the past?

Children explore how their patterns of visit to places might have been different two generations ago.

Introduce the children to the text Window.

Pose the question to the children: How do you think your grandma and grandpa connected to others when they were young? Discuss with the children how technology has changed over time.

As a class, complete a guided research task, researching how technology and transport have changed over time.

Invite a grandparent or parent/carer to be interviewed about the places that they visited as children and how often they visited them. Interview in person or by using Skype or email.

Lead a whole class discussion to conclude how the children’s grandparents and parents may not have visited as many places, or have connected with as many people, because transport and communication technology were slower.





Wikipedia, Transport, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transport

Session 9 (Sessions 9–10 Assessment)

In this session, the children collaborate with the class to design a list of questions that they will take home and use to interview their parents/carers, family or significant other. They will record their questions and responses.

Model and scaffold the questions with question starters and role play an interview situation.

Have the children take home the questions to conduct their interviews.









Sessions 9–10: Assessment

Provide preparation time for the children to plan a presentation and map their places (local, national or global) on a Google map (electronically or in print form), using markers to identify locations and features.

Using the map and the geographical data and information that they collected, ask the children to deliver a multimodal presentation, to a small group or to the whole class, about the connections they have to other places and why these are special to them.

The children should use the collected information and data to evaluate how factors of location and distance influence the connections they have to other places. The multimodal presentation should use photographs, film, maps or tables to identify the connections with other places. Make adjustments to the assessment as required by providing the children with outline maps.












Use feedback

Ways to monitor learning and assessment

Teachers meet to collaboratively plan the teaching, learning and assessment to meet the needs of all learners in each unit.

Teachers create opportunities for discussion about levels of achievement to develop shared understandings; co-mark or cross mark at key points to ensure consistency of judgments; and participate in moderating samples of student work at school or cluster level to reach consensus and consistency.



Feedback to children

Teachers strategically plan opportunities and ways to provide ongoing feedback (both written and informal) and encouragement to children on their strengths and areas for improvement.

Children reflect on and discuss, with their teachers or peers, what they can do well and what they need to improve.

Teachers reflect on and review learning opportunities to incorporate specific learning experiences and provide multiple opportunities for children to experience, practise and improve.


Reflection on the unit plan

Identify what worked well during and at the end of the unit, including:

activities that worked well and why

activities that could be improved and how

assessment that worked well and why

assessment that could be improved and how

common misconceptions of children that need, or needed, to be clarified.


Appendix

Concepts for developing geographical understandings in Years P–2


Concept

Description

Place

Places are parts of the Earth’s surface and can be described by location, shape, boundaries, features and environmental and human characteristics. Places are unique in their characteristics and play a fundamental role in human life. They may be perceived, experienced, understood and valued differently. They range in size from a part of a room to a major world region. For Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples, Country/Place is important for its significance to culture, identity and spirituality.

In P–2, children explore the places they live in and belong to, and learn to observe and describe features of places. Children also become aware of, and interested in, more distant places. The idea of active citizenship is developed as children consider how places can be cared for.



Space

Spaces are defined by the location of environmental and human features, geographical phenomena and activities across the Earth’s surface that form distributions and patterns. Spaces are perceived, structured, organised and managed and can be designed and redesigned to achieve particular purposes. Space can be explored at different levels or scales.

In P–2, children’s spatial thinking starts by learning about direction and distance and how familiar things, such as the classroom or school grounds, are organised for different purposes. By Year 2, children become aware of the distances between places and how distance constrains their activities.



Environment

The environment is the product of geological, atmospheric, hydrological, geomorphic, edaphic (soil), biotic and human processes. The concept of environment is about the significance of the environment in human life, and the important interrelationships between humans and the environment. The environment supports and enriches human and other life by providing raw materials and food, absorbing and recycling wastes, maintaining a safe habitat and being a source of enjoyment and inspiration.

In Years 1 and 2, children are introduced to the concept of the environment through the exploration of their own environment and other places, and by recognising how places vary in terms of their natural features.



Interconnection

Interconnection is the way that people and/or geographical phenomena are connected to each other through environmental processes and human activity. Interconnections can be simple, complex, reciprocal or interdependent and have a strong influence on the characteristics of places. An understanding of the concept of interconnection leads to holistic thinking. This helps children to understand Aboriginal peoples’ and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ holistic connection to Country/Place and the knowledge and practices that developed as a result of this connection.

In Year 2, children are introduced to the concept of interconnection when learning how they are connected to places throughout the world and through exploring connections of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples to Country/Place.



Scale

Scale refers to the different spatial levels used to investigate phenomena or represent phenomena visually (maps, images, graphs), from the personal to local, regional, national, world regional and global levels. Scale is also involved when geographers look for explanations or outcomes at different levels. Scale may be perceived differently by groups and can be used to elevate or diminish the significance of an issue, for example, a local issue or global issue.

In P–2, children explore place, space and environment in studies at the personal and local scale.






1 Part 6 of the Disability Standards for Education (The Standards for Curriculum Development, Accreditation and Delivery) states that education providers, including class teachers, must take reasonable steps to ensure a course/program is designed to allow any child to participate and experience success in learning. The Disability Standards for Education 2005 (Cwlth) is available from: www.ag.gov.au > select Human rights and anti-discrimination > Disability standards for education.

DRAFT Queensland Studies Authority July 2013 | 


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