Writing Course Review Form



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Writing Course Review Form (1/12)


I. General Education Review – Writing Course


Dept/Program
Subject

HISTORY

Course # (i.e. ENEX 200)

HSTA 315

Course Title

The Early American Republic, 1787-1848

II. Endorsement/Approvals
Complete the form and obtain signatures before submitting to Faculty Senate Office.

Please type / print name

Signature

Date

Instructor

    Kyle G. Volk







Phone / Email

X2989 / kyle.volk@umontana.edu







Program Chair

John Eglin







Dean

Chris Comer







III. Type of request

New

X

One-time Only




Change




Remove




Reason for new course, change or deletion

Existing Course Applying for Writing Designation

IV Overview of the Course Purpose/ Description: Provide an introduction to the subject matter and course content.

This discussion-based advanced elective asks students to engage with the major social, cultural, economic, & political transformations in the United States from 1787-1848. Topics covered in this course include: the creation of the U.S. Constitution & the rise of democracy; political economy & the early-American state; western expansion, migration, war, & American imperialism; religion, & reform; the maturation of southern slave society; the rise of the “Free” North, market capitalism & urban culture; slavery, abolition, & sectional conflict. Students will read, critically analyze, and discuss primary sources and historical scholarship in class discussions and written assignments. Intensive reading and writing are fundamental components of this course. This course is a designated “Writing Course.”




V Learning Outcomes: Explain how each of the following learning outcomes will be achieved.

Student learning outcomes :

Use writing to learn and synthesize new concepts



This course is designed around the following objectives, all of which attend to learning and synthesizing new concepts:

  • understand the key contours of US History from 1787-1848

  • examine how Americans living in the Early Republic understood and debated such ideas as democracy, equality, slavery, and freedom

Formulate and express written opinions and ideas that are developed, logical, and organized

Students craft 3 analytical essays that critically analyze primary sources.

Compose written documents that are appropriate for a given audience, purpose and context

Students craft 3 analytical essays that critically analyze primary sources. These essays are to be written in the tone and style appropriate to the historical profession.

Revise written work based on constructive comments from the instructor

Students are required to rewrite two of the three essays based on instructor feedback.

Find, evaluate, and use information effectively and ethically (see http://www.lib.umt.edu/informationliteracy/)

Students draw on a variety of secondary sources and primary sources as well as classroom discussions to craft analytical essays.

Begin to use discipline-specific writing conventions

Students receive instruction on appropriate use of Chicago Manual of Style footnoting.

Demonstrate appropriate English language usage

Students are assessed for appropriate use of standard, edited, English language writing skills and receive input on style, punctuation, and grammar in class and as part of paper-specific feedback.

VI. Writing Course Requirements

Enrollment is capped at 25 students.
If not, list maximum course enrollment. Explain how outcomes will be adequately met for this number of students. Justify the request for variance.

Yes.

What instructional methods will be used to teach students to write for specific audiences, purposes, and genres?

Early on in class we discuss secondary texts. Part of our discussion includes an examination of how historians develop their argument for target audiences. I likewise provide input on the differences between historical, literary, and popular writing.

Which written assignments will include revision in response to instructor’s feedback?

Students will rewrite the first two of three papers.

VII. Writing Assignments: Please describe course assignments. Students should be required to individually compose at least 16 pages of writing for assessment. At least 50% of the course grade should be based on students’ performance on writing assignments. Clear expression, quality, and accuracy of content are considered an integral part of the grade on any writing assignment.

Formal Graded Assignments


Three papers (including rewrites) = 80% of their course grade.

Informal Ungraded Assignments


Participation (including quizzes) = 20% of the course grade.

VIII. Syllabus: Paste syllabus below or attach and send digital copy with form. 
For assistance on syllabus preparation see: http://teaching.berkeley.edu/bgd/syllabus.html

The syllabus must include the following:


1. Writing outcomes

2. Information literacy expectations

3. Detailed requirements for all writing assignments or append writing assignment instructions



Paste syllabus here.

The Early American Republic, 1787-1848

HSTA 315

University of Montana – Missoula

Spring 2014 – T/R 11:10-12:30 – LA308
Professor Kyle G. Volk

Office: LA 260 Phone: (406) 243-2989

Office Hours: T/R 5-6PM; immediately after class, and by appointment

Email: kyle.volk@umontana.edu
Course Description:

This discussion-based advanced elective asks students to engage with the major social, cultural, economic, & political transformations in the United States from 1787-1848. Topics covered in this course include: the creation of the U.S. Constitution & the rise of democracy; political economy & the early-American state; western expansion, migration, war, & American imperialism; religion, & reform; the maturation of southern slave society; the rise of the “Free” North, market capitalism & urban culture; slavery, abolition, & sectional conflict. Students will read, critically analyze, and discuss primary sources and historical scholarship in class discussions and written assignments. Intensive reading and writing are fundamental components of this course. This course is a designated “Writing Course.”


Course Requirements & Grading:

**Attendance & Participation: (20% of Final Grade)

Attendance is mandatory and will be taken at every class meeting. Unexcused absences will lower your grade. Having more than three unexcused absences will result in a zero (0/20) in your participation grade. Active, informed participation is imperative to your success in this course! Students are expected to come to class punctually having completed the assigned readings and having taken time to think critically about each primary text and/or secondary interpretation in its specifics, in its entirety, and as it relates to other texts and our on-going discussions. Participation means both talking with and listening to your classmates. Please come to class with the readings in hard copy (Print out primary sources from MOODLE).


All electronic devices must be turned off and kept out of sight. Please do not use laptop computers in this course.
**Reading Quizzes: Short & simple quizzes will be given at the beginning of each class to ensure that students are doing the reading. The results will be factored in the participation grade. Students may use (and are encouraged to use) notes they have taken during the quizzes. Students, however, may not use the original text. Please take separate notes.
** Written Assignments: (80% of Final Grade)

  1. One 4-5-page analytical essay on James Fenimore Cooper’s The Pioneers (Due 2/5) [20%]

  2. One 7-8-page analytical essay on Tocqueville, Walker, Beecher, Skidmore, and Black Hawk (Due 4/8) [25%]

  3. One Final Essay Exploring a Substantial Primary Source & Relating it to Course Themes (Due 5/6) [35%]

Each of these assignments will be discussed in greater detail during the course of the semester. They are to be written in the tone and style appropriate to the historical profession and must make use of the citation system used by academic historians (Chicago Manual of Style). These assignments will be turned in at the start of class on the day they are due unless otherwise specified. Late papers will be downgraded. In order to pass this course, students must turn in every assignment.


Readings (Available at the bookstore and on reserve at Mansfield Library):

  • James Fenimore Cooper, The Pioneers [1822]

  • Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America [1835]

  • Sean Wilentz, ed., David Walker’s Appeal [1829]

  • Donald Jackson, ed., Black Hawk: An Autobiography [1833]

  • Henry David Thoreau, Civil Disobedience & Other Essays [1849]

  • Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl: Written by Herself [1861]

  • Woody Holton, Unruly Americans & the Origins of the Constitution (2007)

  • Adam Rothman, Slave Country: American Expansion in the Deep South (2005)

  • Patricia Cline Cohen, The Murder of Helen Jewett (1999)

  • Timothy J. Henderson, A Glorious Defeat: Mexico and Its War with the United States (2007)

Also on reserve for reference purposes: Eric Foner, Give Me Liberty!: An American History – Volume 1


***Several of the reading assignments are available through MOODLE. Please print these out and bring them to class.
Writing Outcomes: Students successfully completing this course should gain a clear understanding of the parameters of professional historical and analytical writing. Students will construct three essays, which are designed to grow students’ ability to interrogate varied primary sources and to craft cogent thesis-driven essays that critically analyze those sources. Students will gain experience in developing a thesis statement, constructing a persuasive argument supported by textual evidence, and producing clear and readable prose. To emphasize the importance of revision and refinement, students will rewrite two of the three essays after receiving feedback from the instructor.
Information Literacy Expectations: Students successfully completing this course should gain an understanding of key themes and developments in American History during the period under study. Students should gain the ability to contrast different interpretations of the period’s history and to offer original and varied interpretations of primary sources drawn from the period. Students should also learn how to find primary sources from the period on their own and to cite those sources properly in professional writing.
ACADEMIC HONESTY – All students must practice academic honesty. It should go without saying that all the work you do in this course should be your own. Plagiarism, cheating, or any other instances of academic misconduct will result in a failing grade in this course. The academic dean will also be notified and offenses could result in expulsion. All students need to be familiar with the Student Conduct Code. The code is available at http://life.umt.edu/vpsa/student_conduct.php. If you have questions, please ask the instructor or teaching assistants BEFORE turning in an assignment.
Students with documented disabilities will receive reasonable modifications in this course. Your responsibilities are to request them from me with sufficient advance notice, and to be prepared to provide verification of disability and its impact from Disability Services for Students. Please speak with me after class or during my office hours to discuss the details. For more information, visit the Disability Services for Students website at http://www.umt.edu/disability.
Course Schedule

Week I

T (1/22) – Introductions


R (1/24) – Post-Colonial America & the Stakes of the Early Republic
Begin Reading Holton, Unruly Americans
Week II – The Constitution of 1787

T (1/29) – Read: Holton, Unruly Americans, ix-176


R (1/31) –Read: Holton, Unruly Americans, 177-278
Week III – Search for National Identity

T (2/5) – Read: Cooper, The Pioneers, vii-250


R (2/7) –Read: Cooper, The Pioneers, 251-456
Week IV – Everyday Life in the New Republic

T (2/12) – MOVIE: A Midwife’s Tale


DUE at the Beginning of Class: 4-5-Page Analytical Essay on Cooper’s The Pioneers
**Extra Credit Opportunity: Attend “Four Presidents Look at Alexander Hamilton” – Missoula Public Library, 7PM
R (2/14) – MOVIE (cont’d) & Discussion

Read: “Dialogue, Paradigm Shift Books: A Midwife’s Tale by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich,” Journal of Women’s History, 14(3) 2002: 133-161



Week V – A House Expanding / A House Dividing

T (2/19) – Read: Rothman, Slave Country, ix-118

R (2/21) – Read: Rothman, Slave Country, 119-224


Week VI – Market Revolution, Reform, & the Urban North

T (2/26) – Read: Cohen, Murder of Helen Jewett, 3-151



DUE at the Beginning of Class: Rewrite of Analytical Essay on Cooper’s The Pioneers
R (2/28) – Read: Cohen, Murder of Helen Jewett, 152-300

Week VII

T (3/4) – Read: Cohen, Murder of Helen Jewett, 301-409



R (3/6) – Read: Sean Wilentz, The Rise of American Democracy, excerpts [MOODLE]



Week VIII – Democracy in America

T (3/11) – Read: Tocqueville, Democracy in America, 3-104; 165-205


R (3/13) –Read: Tocqueville, Democracy in America, 220-396
Week IX – Conflict & Reform, Pt. 1

T (3/18) – Read: Black Hawk, 32-156


R (3/20) – Read: Thomas Skidmore, Rights of Man to Property! [MOODLE]
***SPRING BREAK (3/24 – 3/28)
Week X – Conflict & Reform, Pt. 2

T (4/1) – Meet w/Donna Mccrea @ Mansfield Library in the Student Learning Center (Level 2)


R (4/3) – Read: David Walker, Appeal, 1-88

Week XI – Slavery as a Political Problem / History & Film

T (4/8) – MOVIE: Amistad


DUE at the Beginning of Class: 7-8-Page Analytical Essay
R (4/10) – Amistad (cont’d) Read: “Amistad: Controversy About the Film and Its Use,” The History Teacher 31(May 1998), 369-387. [E-RESERVE]
Week XII – Slavery, the Old South, & the Slave Narrative

T (4/15) – Read: Jacobs, Incidents in the Life, v-92

R (4/17) – Read: Jacobs, Incidents in the Life, 92-167

Week XIII – Manifest Destiny

T (4/22) – Read: Henderson, A Glorious Defeat, xvii-101


Due at the Beginning of Class: Rewrite of 7-8-Page Analytical Essay
R (4/24) – Read: Henderson, A Glorious Defeat, 102-191
Week XIV – Dissent & Democracy

T (4/29) – Read: Thoreau, Civil Disobedience


R (5/1) – Conclusions
Finals Week – Final Paper Due (5/6) by 11AM to my office (LA 260)

Writing Assignments
1st Paper on James Fenimore Cooper, The Pioneers (due 2/12 at the beginning of class)

Craft a short 4-5-page analytical & thesis (argument)-driven essay that interrogates a critical theme in James Fenimore Cooper's The Pioneers.


Strong essays will:
1.) Use the novel as historical evidence for a picture of society in post-Revolutionary America (ie. what does this tell us about early America?); and
2.) Unpack James Fenimore Cooper's perspective on American life (on the New York frontier &/or early America)—and—discuss how that perspective shapes the story/evidence he presents (ie. how does Cooper's particular telling of the story influence his presentation of life in upstate New York and the early republic?).

Possible Themes: legacies of the Am. Revolution; socio-political order on the frontier; competing visions of law, order, right, government; environment/landscape/resources; religion; cultural clashes; race, class, & gender relations; etc.

Again, these are only "possible" - feel free to discuss possible topics with me ahead of time.


*****
2nd Paper on Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, et. al
Reading Tocqueville:

I encourage you all to read Democracy in America in its entirety. This is a critically influential work that has guided political theorists and historians –and– is often referred to in present-day political discourse. That said, what I have done below is streamlined the reading. 1st, page numbers in italics and emboldened are fundamental passages. Not only read these passages, but take time to think critically about them. 2nd, page numbers in parentheses are important for your comprehension of this text, but spend less time with them then the other sections.


***Reading Assignment #1 [For Tuesday’s Class (3/11)]:

p. 3-15; (19-44); 44-65; (65-75); 75-104; 165-205


***Reading Assignment #2 [For Thursday’s Class (3/13)]:

p. 220-258; (258-264); 264-288; (288-302); 302-384; (384-391); 391-396



Some Key Things to Think About (w/Tocqueville):

What is Tocqueville’s conception of democracy? How might his conception differ from your own?

What does he see as the strengths, weaknesses, and dangers of democracy?

How does his perspective as a European (and a French aristocrat) shape his analysis?


Paper Assignment:
On 4/8/08 you will turn in a carefully planned and clearly organized 7-8-page analytical and thesis-driven essay.
The essay will be based on an original question that you ask involving Tocqueville and at least two of the following three texts: Black Hawk, Skidmore’s Rights of Man to Property!, and David Walker’s Appeal. We will talk in class about how to formulate a good original question. I’ll ask you to meet with me during the week of 3/31 to discuss your question and paper.
*****

Final Paper Assignment
“One Final Essay Exploring a Substantial Primary Source & Relating it to Course Themes (Due 5/6) [20%]”
My expectations for this paper:
1. Read & think about a substantial primary source that we’ve agreed upon ahead of time.
2. Craft a 10-page essay that analyzes that source w/ respect to course themes & readings.
When choosing the focus of your essay, keep in mind that the best essays typically take a “narrow & deep” approach. They concentrate on a specific theme and provide specific evidence to support a specific area of analysis, yet they also use that “narrow and deep” approach to say something of larger significance.
3. The essay should be well-written and clearly organized. It should display your best historical thinking and analytical prose.
4. The essay should have a compelling introduction that makes the reader want to continue reading.
5. The essay must have an argument. This argument must be clear & must be provable w/evidence drawn from the primary source itself and relevant primary & secondary sources that we’ve read this semester. [Do not feel compelled to mention every book we’ve read. Again, I’d prefer a deeper analysis that relates to one or two of our texts. Less is more.]
ITALICIZE or Boldface your thesis in the final draft.
6. Assume that your reader (audience) has no knowledge of the primary source you are using or the period in general.
7. Use properly formatted footnotes.
8. Avoid musing on the virtues of primary sources, engaging in ahistorical speculations, and arguing with your primary source (especially w/ the benefit of hindsight).
9. Keep the tone professional.

******



Standard Paper Writing Guidelines (For use in all of your papers at UM unless you are told otherwise):
1.      Your essay should be double-spaced (Not single, 1.5, triple-spaced, or otherwise)

2.      Write in a standard font (Times New Roman; Calibri) at either 11 or 12 point.

3.      Margins (Top, Bottom, Left, & Right) must be 1-inch.
NOTE: DO NOT try to lengthen your paper by enlarging the font, shrinking the margins, or expanding the spacing between lines. ALSO, DO NOT try to shorten your paper by doing the opposite. [Doing these things will result in a lower grade]
4.      DO NOT attach a separate cover page. Instead list your name and the course at the Top Right of the first page (and single-space it). Skip one line and center your title. ALWAYS HAVE A TITLE!

5.      DO NOT skip extra lines between paragraphs. Adjust your word processor if necessary.

6.      Insert page numbers (do not number the first page).

7.      Write history papers in past tense (unless you are talking about 2ndary scholarship).

8. Cite your sources using footnotes. Use proper footnote form.

9.      Proofread & edit your work!



10.    Read your paper aloud and correct any sentences that were difficult to speak.

11.  Address any questions with your instructor well before the due date.


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