Window on the Past As the story opens, Luke is attempting to cross



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Window on the Past
1. As the story opens, Luke is attempting to cross

a. Lake Bennett.

b. the Chilkoot Pass.

c. the White Pass.

d. the Yukon River.
2. In Dawson, prices are very high. Wages are

a. the same as in Victoria.

b. lower than in Victoria.

c. extremely high.

d. the same as in Winnipeg.
3. The Mounties stopped people at the border to

a. ensure newcomers had enough supplies.

b. look for known criminals.

c. collect a tax on immigrants.

d. look for illegal liquor.
4. The stampeders stopped at Lake Bennett to

a. rest.


b. build a raft.

c. build a boat.

d. build a sled.
5. The population of Dawson in 1899 was

a. 5000.


b. 10 000.

c. 20 000.

d. 50 000.
6. The superintendent of the NWMP in Dawson is

a. Soapy Smith.

b. Sam Steele.

c. Robert Henderson.

d. George Carmack.
Timeline
1. Which of the following events took place first?

a. The first automobiles are imported into Canada from the US.

b. The Alaska boundary dispute is settled.

c. Wilfrid Laurier becomes Prime Minister.

d. Alberta and Saskatchewan become the eighth and ninth provinces.
2. Which of the following events took place first?

a. BC Native chiefs take land claims to the British Privy Council.

b. The first airplane flight in Canada takes place.

c. The Conservatives under Robert Borden win the general election.

d. The first transatlantic wireless message is received.
3. Which of the following events took place last?

a. The Titanic sinks off the coast of Newfoundland.

b. World War I begins.

c. The Conservatives under Robert Borden win the general election.

d. The first airplane flight in Canada takes place.

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4. Which of the following events took place last?

a. Asians are attacked during Vancouver riots.

b. The Alaska boundary dispute is settled.

c. Alberta and Saskatchewan become the eighth and ninth provinces.

d. The Boer War breaks out in South Africa.


5. Which of the following events are out of sequence?

a. The Boer War breaks out in South Africa.

b. The Alaska boundary dispute is settled.

c. The first transatlantic wireless message is received.

d. Alberta and Saskatchewan become the eighth and ninth provinces.
6. Which of the following events are out of sequence?

a. Asians are attacked during Vancouver riots.

b. The Conservatives under Robert Borden win the general election.

c. The first airplane flight in Canada takes place.

d. The Titanic sinks off the coast of Newfoundland.
Multiple Choice Questions
1. Supporters of the British Empire were called

a. nationalists.

b. imperialists.

c. colonialists.

d. militarists.
2. which of the following issues helped Laurier to win the Canadian federal election of 1896?

a. the Manitoba schools question

b. the Alaska boundary dispute

c. Canada's participation in the Boer War

d. reciprocity with the US
3. Laurier's decision as to what Canada's role should be in the Boer War was to

a. refuse to send any troops.

b. send volunteers to be part of the British forces.

c. send volunteers as an independent Canadian corps.

d. send conscripts as an independent Canadian corps.
4. The naval issue that divided English- and French-Canadians in the early 1900s was caused by

a. the increasing size of the US Navy.

b. a naval race between Britain and France.

c. the need for Canada to patrol its coastline.

d. a naval race between Britain and Germany.
5. In terms of the naval issue, most English-Canadians believed that Canada should

a. remain neutral and not get involved.

b. contribute ships or money to Britain.

c. have its own navy.

d. rely on the US Navy for defence.
6. The position of most French-Canadians on the naval issue was that Canada should

a. remain neutral and not get involved.

b. contribute ships or money to Britain.

c. have its own navy.

d. rely on the American Navy for defence.
7. Laurier compromised on the naval issue, and this angered

a. both English and French Canada.

b. the British.

c. the Americans.

d. both the Americans and the French.

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8. Which region of Canada supported reciprocity in the early 20th century?

a. the Maritimes

b. Quebec

c. Ontario

d. the West


9. As a result of the reciprocity debates during the 1911 Canadian federal election,

a. Laurier won the election.

b. Borden won the election.

c. a reciprocity treaty was signed in 1912.

d. Laurier raised tariffs in 1913.
10. At the root of the Alaska boundary dispute was the

a. Canadian plan to buy Alaska.

b. Canadian need for direct access to the Pacific from the Yukon.

c. American need to control gold shipments from the Yukon.

d. American plan to purchase the Yukon.
11. The international tribunal on the Alaska boundary dispute

a. upheld the Canadian claim.

b. created a new boundary that favoured the US.

c. upheld the American claim.

d. created a new boundary that favoured Canada.
12. One consequence of the Klondike Gold Rush was that

a. the world's economy was helped out of a depression.

b. most stampeders and prospectors got rich.

c. Canada became richer and more powerful than Britain.

d. the Yukon became a province in 1900.
13. The cabinet minister responsible for immigration in Laurier's government was

a. Mackenzie.

b. Sifton.

c. McBride.

d. Macdonald.
14. Which of the following advertising slogans did the Canadian government use to attract immigrants to the prairies?

a. "Free Farmland for Good Farmers!"

b. "Grow Wheat and Get Rich Quick!"

c. "The Last Best West"

d. "Come to the Great Lone Land"
15. The Canadian government wanted the prairies to be settled by

a. British subjects.

b. anyone with physical strength.

c. dryland farmers.

d. industrial workers.
16. American settlers were most successful in the prairies because they

a. paid a bounty to come to Canada and had relatives in the prairies.

b. knew prairie farming and came with more money than other immigrants.

c. had escaped political persecution and poverty in the US.

d. were more educated and much stronger than other immigrants.
17. Home children, who were sent to Canada in the late 18th and early 20th century, were

a. always treated well.

b. usually sent back to England.

c. often used as cheap labour.

d. always orphans.

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18. Which of the following was not a push factor in immigration to Canada?

a. the need to leave one's homeland

b. opportunities in a new country

c. overpopulation in one's homeland

d. a lack of homesteading land in the US


19. Which of the following was not a pull factor in immigration?

a. rising grain prices

b. opportunities in a new country

c. improvement in quality of life

d. overpopulation in one's homeland
20. Many early homesteaders on the prairies built their homes out of

a. wood.


b. canvas.

c. sod.


d. bricks.
21. The CPR obtained what proportion of sections in a prairie township?

a. 1 in 2

b. 1 in 3

c. 1 in 4

d. 1 in 5
22. In Canada's cities in the late 18th and early 20th centuries, tenements were

a. regulated by city inspectors.

b. crowded, but clean.

c. crowded, with poor sanitation.

d. reserved for British subjects.
23. Which of the following groups shared in the prosperity of the Laurier "boom"?

a. the working class

b. capitalists

c. immigrants to the cities

d. Native peoples
24. Two additional transcontinental rail lines were built in Canada in the early 20th century because of

a. dissatisfaction with the CPR monopoly.

b. large grants from the provinces.

c. federal money generated by the Klondike Gold Rush.

d. American investment in Canadian rail companies.
25. By the time the Grand Trunk Pacific and the Canadian Northern railways were finished,

a. the CPR had gone bankrupt.

b. both companies were profitable.

c. both companies were government-owned.

d. farmers still had no way to ship goods except via the CPR.
26. In Canada, before World War I, employers would often respond to a strike by

a. firing striking workers.

b. confronting strikers with private police.

c. calling in the militia to force strikers back to work.

d. all of these
27. Which of the following factors led to strikes at the Dunsmuir coal mines on Vancouver Island?

a. wage cuts

b. unsafe working conditions

c. refusal of Dunsmuir to recognize unions

d. all of these

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28. Faced with a strike that was into its second year, the Dunsmuir mines

a. held round-the-clock negotiations with strikers.

b. gave emergency food rations to workers' families.

c. convinced the Canadian government to end the strike.

d. evicted strikers' families and called in strikebreakers.


29. The Laurier government's policies led to a flood of immigration, and in British Columbia demands were made to stop immigration from

a. Asia.


b. Europe.

c. Britain.

d. the United States.
30. The Asiatic Exclusion League was formed by

a. opponents of Asian immigration.

b. the Chinese community to abolish the head tax.

c. the Anglican Church, to keep Asians from being deported.

d. the Chinese government, to stop emigration to Canada.
31. In order to halt East Indian immigration, the Canadian government

a. asked Britain to pass legislation forbidding their immigration.

b. enacted "continuous passage" legislation.

c. introduced a head tax on East Indian immigration.

d. mounted a naval blockade of the Indian Ocean.
32. During the Laurier years, women who demanded the right to vote were called

a. "feminists."

b. "liberationists."

c. "suffragists."

d. all of these
33. In Canada, women first won the right to vote in

a. Ontario.

b. the prairie provinces.

c. British Columbia.

d. Quebec.
34. The Women's Christian Temperance Union promoted prohibition, which means the

a. condemnation of all non-Christian and immoral acts.

b. banning of the sale and consumption of tobacco.

c. banning of the sale and consumption of alcohol.

d. banning of women from working outside the home.
35. In making their land claims, Native leaders referred to the

a. Quebec Act.

b. British North America Act.

c. Constitutional Act of 1791.

d. Royal Proclamation of 1763.
36. In British Columbia, the Native peoples had retained their lands longer than the Native peoples of the east because

a. the British government saw Native peoples as equals.

b. Native people had positions in the colonial government.

c. large-scale settlement happened later in BC than in the east.

d. all of the above
37. When the Native peoples opposed the sale of cut-off lands on the basis that the Indian Act said this required Native consent, the Canadian government

a. agreed with the Native position and issued an apology.

b. changed the Indian Act and removed the need for consent.

c. turned over money from the sales to Native groups.

d. blockaded the reserves and arrested Native "troublemakers."

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38. The important Northwest Coast ceremony that was banned in 1884 was the

a. Sun Dance.

b. gathering of the tribes.

c. potlatch.

d. Raven Dance.


39. The Nisga'a land claim took how many years to settle?

a. 5


b. 23

c. 56


d. 91
40. Canada's first gas station was located in

a. Toronto.

b. Ottawa.

c. Vancouver.

d. Winnipeg.
41. Before World War I, radio was primarily used to

a. broadcast music programs.

b. transmit stock market data.

c. transmit Morse code telegraphs.

d. broadcast weather forecasts.
42. Which of the following technological innovations was not introduced before 1914?

a. the telephone

b. motion pictures

c. automobiles

d. home refrigerators
Short Answer Questions
1. Why would Canada's immigration minister want to attract immigrants to Canada's prairie provinces from eastern and central Europe and from the plains south of the border? In your response, describe the difficulties the Selkirk settlers had experienced earlier at Red River.
2. Contrast the attitudes of English- and French-Canadians towards the British Empire. Provide examples of four ways in which their attitudes were different.
3. Explain why Canadians were angry with the international tribunal's ruling in the Alaska boundary dispute. Describe the composition of the tribunal and the position taken by the British judge.
4. "Americans were the most successful immigrants to the Canadian prairies." Evaluate this statement and provide four factors that support your evaluation.
5. Explain the meaning of push-pull factors in immigration. Identify four push factors and four pull factors that played a role in the wave of immigration to Canada between 1891 and 1921.
6. Explain why not all Canadians shared in the prosperity of the Laurier boom. In your response, discuss the social divisions within Canada and the role the Canadian government played in distributing wealth and protecting workers' rights and needs.
7. Identify seven site and situation factors that were used to determine where railway cities should be located.
8. Discuss the factors that led to the creation of labour unions in Canada. Keep in mind the social divisions in Canada during the early 20th century and the role the Canadian government played in labour issues.

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9. Describe how governments in Canada discouraged Asian immigration in the early 20th century. Refer specifically to Chinese, Japanese, and East Indian immigration.


10. Describe the women who led the suffragist movement in Canada and the process by which they obtained the right to vote. Also identify where they first achieved success in Canada.
11. Justify the 1998 Nisga'a land treaty and identify four of its key terms.
Skills Questions

[Teacher: Provide copy of Figure 7-7, Horizons, p. 259. OMIT CAPTION]
Use the copy of Figure 7-7 provided to answer the questions below.
1. How much land did homesteaders receive?
2. Identify at least three examples of exaggeration.
3. Explain why Canada is placed at the centre of the map.

[Teacher: Provide copy of Figure 7-1, Horizons, p. 260]
Use the table provided to answer the questions below.
4. Explain the drop in the population of the Yukon between 1901 and 1921.
5. Which area had the largest population in 1901?
6. Which area had the largest population in 1921?
7. Explain why most of the population increase between 1911 and 1921 occurred before 1914.

[Teacher: Provide copy of Figure 7-11, Horizons, p. 263]

[Note: Students will need calculators for these questions.]
Use the copy of Figure 7-11 provided to answer the questions below. You will need a calculator.
8. How many sections were reserved for the CPR? What percentage of a township was this?
9. How many sections were set aside for schools? What percentage of a township was this?
10. What percentage of sections were set aside for settlement?
11. Assuming that each section was worth $640, what was the value of CPR land in each township? of HBC land in each township?

[Teacher: Provide copy of Tables 1-14, Horizons, p. 286 and p. 287]

[Note: Students will need calculators for these questions.]
Use the tables provided to answer the questions below. You will need a calculator.
12. How many telephones per person were there in 1901? in 1911?
13. Explain why there were more telephones than cars.
14. What percentage of immigrants were British in 1897? in 1913?

PAGE 8


(c) 2000, Prentice Hall Ginn Canada. All rights reserved.

PAGE 1
ANSWER KEY FOR TEST - UNTITLED


Window on the Past
1. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 1


2. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 2


3. a

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 3


4. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 4


5. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 5


6. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 6


Timeline
1. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 1


2. d

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 2


3. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 3


4. a

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 4


5. b/c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 5


6. b/c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 6


Multiple Choice Questions
1. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 1


2. a

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 2


3. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 3


4. d

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 4


5. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 5


6. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 6

PAGE 2
7. a

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 7


8. d

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 8


9. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 9


10. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 10


11. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 11


12. a

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 12


13. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 13


14. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 14


15. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 15


16. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 16


17. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 17


18. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 18


19. d

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 19


20. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 20


21. a

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 21


22. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 22


23. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 23


24. a

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 24


25. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 25


26. d

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 26


27. d

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 27

PAGE 3
28. d

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 28


29. a

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 29


30. a

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 30


31. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 31


32. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 32


33. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 33


34. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 34


35. d

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 35


36. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 36


37. b

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 37


38. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 38


39. d

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 39


40. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 40


41. c

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 41


42. d

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 42


Short Answer Questions
1. People from eastern and central Europe and the US plains would be familiar with grasslands and with dryland farming methods. This would make it easier for them to adapt to the topography and climate of the Canadian prairies. When earlier the Scottish settlers arrived at Red River, they were crofters, and had no experience of dryland farming. As a result, they had trouble adapting and Selkirk's experiment failed.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 1


2. English-Canadians spoke English and were proud to be a part of the British Empire. They were loyal to Britain and saw Britain as the model for their society and as a protector of Canada. French-Canadians spoke French and felt close cultural ties to France. As a result, they had no loyalty to Britain and felt isolated from the rest of Canada.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 2

PAGE 4
3. The international tribunal that ruled on the Alaska boundary dispute was composed of six judges: three American, two Canadian, and one British. When the British judged supported the American claim (because of international dealings with the US, Britain was unwilling to alienate the Americans), Canadians felt betrayed. As British subjects, they had expected support from Britain.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 3


4. During the settlement of the Canadian prairies, American immigrants had many advantages. Many of them were experienced prairie farmers, and they came with much more money and farm equipment than did the vast majority of European immigrants. Because they spoke English and shared British cultural roots, they were also more easily assimilated into the dominant colonial life.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 4


5. People immigrate because of two factors: push factors are those that compel them to leave their homeland; pull factors are those that draw them to another country. Push factors would include the need to leave one's homeland: for example, because of crop failures, overpopulation and starvation, and religious discrimination. Another push factor that influenced Canadian immigration was the closing of the American frontier. Immigrants also came to Canada because of pull factors: Canada was seen as a land of opportunity. It offered a better quality of lifeÄÄand free land to settlers. This was particularly attractive in the prairies, because of rising grain prices.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 5


6. During the Laurier boom, most Canadian workers were unskilled. As such, they worked long hours for little pay. Prosperous business people and industrialists paid little or no income tax and often flaunted their great wealth. As well, business profits were not passed on to workers or consumers. As Canadians migrated to the cities to find work, tenements were built. These quickly became overcrowded and unhygienic. During this period, the government had no policies or laws to protect workers or to provide assistance to workers or their families in case of injury or unemployment.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 6


7. In locating railway cities, site and situation factors were critical. Former fur trade posts were often chosen because they were well-located on established routes. Flat, low-lying land was chosen because of its relief. Transportation nodes-where valleys meet; at the confluence of rivers; and gap towns, where passes through hills or mountains existÄÄwere also factors. Bridging pointsÄÄriver crossings, for exampleÄÄwere another factor. Those who decided on where a railway city should be built also looked for sites with a water supply and fuel and energy sources.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 7


8. During the early 20th century, there was a huge gap between rich and poor. Workers were not protected by government legislation and worked long hours for little pay in unsafe conditions. Unions arose because of a need to strengthen workers' rights and to provide a degree of strength through unity. Workers needed better working and living conditions and wanted a greater share of the wealth that their work created for owners.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 8


9. The federal and provincial governments discouraged Asian immigration in many ways. Chinese immigrants were charged a "head tax" ($50 a "head") and confronted legislation that limited the number of arrivals. Legislation also limited the number of Japanese who could immigrate to Canada each year (in British Columbia in 1907, the number was set at 400). The question of East Indian immigration presented a hurdle for racist immigration policies because East Indians were also British subjects. As such, their entry into Canada could not be denied. To get around this, the government introduced "continuous passage" legislation, which required immigrants from India to come to Canada via a direct route. This was impossible at the time.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 9

PAGE 5
10. Primarily middle-class social reformers led the suffragist movement in Canada. Many of the women involved were also members of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, and advocated prohibition. The suffragists used extensive public relations in their campaign, but the process was slow. They first achieved the right to vote in the prairie provinces (in 1916).

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 10


11. The 1998 Nisga'a land treaty was justified by the fact that Nisga'a lands had never been legally claimed by Europeans. The treaty's terms included a provision for local Nisga'a government, Nisga'a control of resources, Nisga'a title to lands, and financial compensation.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 11


Skills Questions
1. Settlers received 160 acres of land.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 1


2. The farms portrayed are extensive and fully developed, which is not what immigrants would face. The climate is billed as " the healthiest in the world." The poster claims there are "vast coal fields at convenient distances."

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 2


3. Canada is placed in the middle of the map to draw attention to Canada and also to make Canada appear as a major and important nation.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 3


4. The decline in population in the Yukon corresponds to the ending of the Klondike Gold Rush.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 4


5. Manitoba

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 5


6. Saskatchewan

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 6


7. World War I broke out in 1914, and this made international travel dangerous or impossible.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 7


8. 16 of 36; 44%

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 8


9. 2 of 36; 5.5%

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 9


10. 16 of 36; 44%

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 10


11. CPR: $10 240; HBC: $1280

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 11


12. (5,371,315 / 63,192) = 0.01; (7,206,842 / 302,759) = 0.04

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 12


13. Telephones were far less expensive and more practical than early cars.

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 13


14. 1897: 52.4%; 1913: 37.4%

Chapter:7 QUESTION: 14




(c) 2000, Prentice Hall Ginn Canada. All rights reserved.


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