Weekly Reading for Medieval Theatre (updated for 2014-5)


Key to this course is that you have read the whole of the York Mystery Cycle before the first seminar



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Key to this course is that you have read the whole of the York Mystery Cycle before the first seminar. We will be using this text as our basis for discussion, especially in the first half of term. The set texts for 1-5 are chosen to compare and contrast with the York pageants specified week-by-week, which are in the editions (above) which you will need to buy.

So, you will also need shared access to a library copy of The York Plays: A Critical Edition of the York Corpus Christi Play as Recorded in British Library Additional MS 35290, ed. Richard Beadle, Early English Text Society Supplementary Series (2 vols.; Oxford University Press, 2009-2013). The text (from Beadle’s earlier edition of 1982) is also available online at http://name.umdl.umich.edu/York

The Chester Plays are online at The Chester Cycle. From Stage to Page - Medieval and Renaissance Drama. ed. Gerard NeCastro, 9th September 2013. http://machias.edu/faculty/necastro/drama/chester/index.html

The text of the Towneley plays is online at http://name.umdl.umich.edu/Towneley

General secondary reading for the course:

The Bible: Old Testament—Genesis and Exodus; New Testament—Matthew, Luke, Acts and Revelation. You can read this is any version you like but bear in mind that anyone who read it in the medieval period probably did so in Latin (and that Bible reading was not encouraged in the general population, even those who could read). The earliest vernacular English — Wycliffite — translation can be found at http://name.umdl.umich.edu/AFZ9170.0001.001. The Revised Standard version is probably a good place to start to read for the story; after the Reformation, the Geneva Bible (which was Shakespeare’s Bible, publ. 1560) was the standard English text until the publication of the Authorised Version (AV or King James Bible) in 1611. I’ll be rereading the AV version and comparing it with the Wycliffite bible in preparation for teaching this course.



The Cambridge Companion to Medieval English Theatre, ed. Richard Beadle and Alan J. Fletcher (2nd ed., CUP, 2008). Ebook via Warwick University Library catalogue (WUL).

Janette Dillon, The Cambridge Introduction to Early English Theatre (CUP, 2006). This is a good place to start with your summer reading.

A.M. Nagler, A Sourcebook of Theatrical History (NY: Dover Publications, 1959) (scans will be available on the course extracts page http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/library/electronicresources/extracts/en.) Several physical copies in Warwick University Library: PN 1721.N2  

Miri Rubin, Corpus Christi: the Eucharist in Late Medieval Culture (CUP, 1991), especially chapters 3 and 4. Physical copy in WUL: BV 823.R8  



Key:

(WUL) – ebook via the library catalogue; (CoEx) – course extract available at http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/library/electronicresources/extracts/en. These are still being scanned but should be available before the start of term.

W = Walker; H= Happé;

Mich = York Plays, ed. Beadle, online at Michigan http://name.umdl.umich.edu/York

Mach = Chester Plays online at The Chester Cycle. From Stage to Page - Medieval and Renaissance Drama. ed. Gerard NeCastro, 9th September 2013. http://machias.edu/faculty/necastro/drama/chester/index.html

Tor = a modern acting text created by A. F. Johnston, based on David Mills’ edition, online at Toronto http://www.reed.utoronto.ca/chester






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