Using rubrics in student self-assessment: student perceptions in the English as a foreign language writing context



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Using rubrics in student self-assessment

Data analysis
An inductive approach of grounded theory (Strauss and Corbin
1998
) was adopted to analyse the students reflective journals and interview data. The data were recursively read with frequent reference to the research questions and Zimmerman and Moylan’s (
2009
) model of self-regulated learning. The researcher and a researcher assistant, who has an MA degree in Applied Linguistics, developed a coding scheme based on the recursive reading. The same coding scheme was applied to both sets of data. They then coded all the data collected using the same scheme, with inter-coder reliability calculated at
0.83. The disagreement of coding was resolved through negotiation. The researcher also independently coded all the data collected one month after the data analysis, with intra-coder reliability calculated at
0.92. The teacher/researcher then translated the results from Chinese, the language in which the data were collected, into English. Participant verification was also sought by sending a summary of the coded results to all the student participants, receiving their agreement with the results.
Table presents the themes and sub-themes of the coding scheme, as well as the frequency of student references to them.
Results
RQ 1. How did students perceive the rubric’s role in self-assessment, especially in relation to
their self-regulated learning of writing?
Analysis of the students reflective journals and interviews found that using the rubric in self-assessment guided them throughout all the three stages of self-regulated learning delineated by Zimmerman and
Moylan (
2009
): forethought, performance and reflection.
Table 2.
themes and codes of student reflective and interview data.
a
Frequencies include the count of references from student reflective journals and case study informants retrospective interview data. theme frequencies may not total code ones because a reference to a theme usually contains several sub-references to the codes under it. Themes and codes
Frequencies a
theme 1: rubric’s role at the forethought stage
23
code 1: goal-setting
16
code 2: Planning an approach to the writing tasks
10
theme 2: rubric’s role at the performance stage
15
code 3: cultivating self-monitoring habits/abilities
15
theme 3: rubric’s role at the self-reflection stage
54
code 4: Aiding self-feedback generation
46
code 5: improving the objectivity of self-grading
14
theme 4: Within-rubric factors affecting its effectiveness
18
code 6: coverage of categories
8
code 7: structure
15
theme 5: descriptors of performance quality
6
code 8: Wording of descriptors
6
theme 6: score range
9
code 9: narrow score scope
9
theme 7: domain knowledge about writing
21
code 10: students original criteria
16
code 11: students english proficiency
7
code 12: students knowledge about essay topics
5
theme 8: length of intervention
10
code 13: sufficient practices of rubric use
6
code 14: scope of applicability
2
code 15: instrumental attitudes
3


6 W. WANG

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