Ushx 3: Industrial Workers



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USHX 6.3: Industrial Workers

Drill: Entrepreneurs & Corporations

Entrepreneurs-people who start new businesses.

Corporations-companies that sell shares of ownership called stocks.


Objectives:

Students will be able to analyze how the Second Industrial Revolution affect U.S. workers by researching why did workers form labor unions, and how were they organized?


Notes:

1. Second Industrial Revolution factories began to replace skilled workers with machines. 2. Factories also used specialization in having workers perform one task over and over

3. Working conditions, however, got worse & some workers began to form labor unions. 4. Collective bargaining- unions tried to negotiate for better conditions for all workers

5. Union goals included: an eight-hour workday and an end to child labor.

6. Unions used strikes to help negotiate for better conditions

7. Workers ' injuries increased because they used more machines and had to work faster.

8. The Knights of Labor worked to get more vacation time, eight-hour workdays and equal pay for equal work.

9. Workers formed labor unions, usually in spite of their employers' objections, to improve working conditions.

10. The Sherman Antitrust Act was used to break the strike by railroad workers, which had stopped almost all mid-western railroad traffic.

11. Collective Bargaining involves union leaders negotiating for better wages and working conditions on behalf of all workers in a particular factory or industry.

12. During the Second Industrial Revolution skilled workers were replaced by unskilled labor.

13. During the Haymarket Riot more than 60 police officers were wounded, 8 police officers died, 100 people in the crowd were wounded.

14. In 1879 the Knights of Labor became the first national labor union
Odds & Ends

1. Workers' injuries increased because they used more machines and had to work faster. 2. Union organizer Mary Harris Jones fought for the rights of Virginia miners

3. Membership in the Knights of Labor declined after one of the people arrested for the Haymarket Riot was found to be a member of the Knights.

4. Unlike the Knights of Labor, the American Federation of Labor included the majority of workers.

5. By 1904 the American Federation of Labor had more than 1.5 million members.

USHX 6.3: Industrial Workers


Inferno: place with intense heat or flames

Standardize: make the same according to a set of standards

Excluded: left out
Understanding Main Ideas

1. a 5. c

2. a 6. b

3. a 7. d


1. unskilled workers 6. Haymarket Riot

2. specialization 7. Federation of Labor

3. labor unions 8. Homestead

4. collective bargaining 9. Pullman

5. Knights of Labor 10. Sherman Antitrust
BIOGRAPHY

1. He completed an apprenticeship at a pump-making factory and began working at the Midvale Steel Company, where he was quickly promoted from machine shop laborer to machinist to foreman. He also took night curses in mechanical engineering.

2. Through long periods of observation on the shop floor, he identified the individual motions that workers went through while performing specific tasks and recorded the amount of time that each motion took. He then analyzed this data and designed new methods for performing the tasks that were free of all motions that seemed unnecessary.

3. In a variety of industrial settings, including a shipyard, an electrical company, and a bicycle factory. In 1898 he was hired to work full-time for the Bethlehem Steel Company. 4. He promoted his ideas through lectures and professional meetings, adopted and raised three young children with his wife, was elected president of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and published ThePrinciples of Scientific Management.


Summary: Today, We learned how workers in the late 1800s organized to fight for better working conditions, but I understand that they had little success. Child labor and an eight- hour workday were two issues that were not settled.
Homework: Collective Bargaining & Knights of Labor

Collective Bargaining: union leaders tried to negotiate for better working conditions Knights of Labor: first national labor union in the United States.

'
Name _____________________________________________________ Date ___________________

USHX 6.3: Industrial Workers


Terms to know:

Inferno


Standardize

Excluded


For each of the following, write the letter of the best choice in the space provided.

________1. During the Second Industrial Revolution, many skilled workers were replaced by

a. unskilled workers. b. puddlers. E. managers. d. robots.

________1. Workers ' injuries increased because a. they used more machines and had to work faster .b. they were forced to work more slowly. c. they were careless. d. machines fell on them.

________3. The Knights of Labor worked to get all of the following EXCEPT a. more vacation time. b. eight-hour workdays. c. equal pay for equal work. d. an end to child labor .

________4. Union organizer Mary Harris Jones fought for the rights of a. anarchists. b. scientific managers.

c. Virginia miners. d. Florida orange pickers.

________5. Membership in the Knights of Labor declined after a. workers realized that the union was not helping them. b. the government outlawed unions. c. one of the people arrested for the Haymarket Riot was found to be a member of the Knights. d. strikes cost workers their jobs.

________6. Unlike the Knights of Labor, the American Federation of Labor a. was led by Terence Powderly.

b. organized national unions into a loose association. e. included the majority of workers. d. actively recruited unskilled workers.

________7. By 1904 the American Federation of Labor a. had very few members. b. was destroyed by anarchists e. had 700,000 members. d. had more than 1.5 million members.
For each of the following statements, till in the blank with the appropriate word, phrase, or name.

Haymarket Riot unskilled workers specialization Federation of Labor

labor unions Homestead collective bargaining Pullman

Knights of Labor Sherman Antitrust


1. During the Second Industrial Revolution, machines run by ________________replaced many skilled workers. 1.. Factories came to focus on having workers repeatedly perform a single step in the production process-because it lowered costs and increased production.

3. Workers formed ________________ usually in spite of their employers' objections, to improve working conditions.

4. ________________ involves union leaders negotiating for better wages and working conditions on behalf of all workers in a particular factory or industry .

5. Under the leadership of Terence Powderly ________________ the allowed unskilled as well as skilled workers to join.

6. During the ________________ more than 60 police officers were wounded, 8 police officers died, l00 people in the crowd were wounded, and several were killed by police.

7. The American ________________organized individual national unions, such as the mineworkers and the steelworkers unions, into a loose association.

8. During the Strike________________ Henry Frick locked workers out of the plant and refused to negotiate with the union or allow union members back to work.

9. Workers at the ________________Palace Car Company went on strike in 1894 to protest wage cuts.

10. The ________________Act was used to break the strike by railroad workers, which had stopped almost all mid-western railroad traffic.

BIOGRAPHY READING: Frederick W. Taylor


Frederick Winslow Taylor was an inventor and industrial engineer. is concept of scientific management

had a powerful impact on the organization of factory work in the United States and around the world. Taylor usedhis theories in a wide variety of business settings, making him the United States first management consultant. Frederick Winslow Taylor was born in 1856 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The son of a successful lawyer, he spent much of his childhood in Europe and attended private schools during his teens. In 1874 he was accepted at

USHX 6.3: Industrial Workers

Harvard University, but a series of eyesight problems and severe headaches prevented him from enrolling. After, several months of recovery at his parents' home, Taylor decided to become an apprentice at a small pump-making factory in Philadelphia.

Over the next 10 years, Taylor became a journeyman, or expert, in the field of industrial man fact ring. In 1878 he completed his apprenticeship and began working at the Midvale Steel Company, where he was quickly promoted from shop laborer to machinist to foreman. Taylor also took night courses d ring this period, and in 1883 he received a master's degree in mechanical engineering. One year later, he was named chief engineer of Midvale Steel.

During his career at Midvale, Taylor invented dozens of new parts for factory equipment and designed the largest steam hammer ever built in the United States. He also developed a set of ideas about industrial work that he would event ally call "scientific management." Through extensive observation on the shop floor, Taylor identified workers' separate motions as they performed specific tasks, and he recorded the amount of time that each motion took. He then analyzed this data and designed new methods that were free of all necessary motions.

Workers in the shop were required to use the new methods, and those whose output exceeded company averages were paid higher wages. While many workers felt that Taylor's management system treated them like machines, it increased production at Midvale Steel in just a few years. Businesses around the country began to take notice, and in 1890 Taylor decided to leave Midvale and apply his ideas elsewhere. After serving as general manager of a paper company in Maine for three years, he returned to Philadelphia and began his own business as a consulting engineer in shop management.

For the next five years, Taylor worked as a consultant in a variety of industrial settings, including a shipyard, an electrical company, and a bicycle factory .He also strengthened his reputation as an engineer by publishing a series of innovative technical papers. In 1898 Taylor was hired to work full-time for the Bethlehem Steel Company, where he refined the details of his management system and helped invent a method for producing steel quickly. He was paid well for both, and in 1901 he retired from business, at the age of 45.

Taylor's retirement was an active one. Convinced that his management ideas cold improve the output of all industries-and thus, the living standards of people around the world-he spent much of his time explaining these concepts through lectures and professional meetings. He also adopted and raised three children with his wife, Louise. In 1906 Taylor was elected president of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Five years later he published The Principles of Scientific Management, a short book that explained his basic theories. The book was event ally translated into nine languages. In early 1915 Taylor developed pneumonia and died at the age of 59.

After you have finished reading the selection, answer the following questions.

1. How did Taylor become an expert in the field of industrial man fact ring?

2. How did Taylor develop the set of ideas that he would event ally call "scientific management"?

3. Where did Taylor work as a consultant?

4. What did Taylor do after he retired from business?


Summarize today's lesson in your own words:
Directory: PCIM3 -> Lessons2005-06 -> USHX -> a.2002-2003
a.2002-2003 -> Missouri Compromise & Indian Removal Act
a.2002-2003 -> Ush: 1: Launching the Nation drill: Pardon & Apportionment Pardon: Freedom from punishment Apportionment: Distribution of representatives in the House of Representatives Objective
a.2002-2003 -> Ush: 1: Reconstruction, Rebuilding the South drill: Manifest Destiny & Forty-Niners Manifest Destiny
a.2002-2003 -> Drill: Monopoly & Protestants
a.2002-2003 -> Drill: Parliament & Bicameral legislature
a.2002-2003 -> Drill: Double Jeopardy & Eminent Domain
a.2002-2003 -> Drill: Reserved & Concurrent Powers
a.2002-2003 -> Ushx: Section 2: Building a Strong Nation drill: Judiciary Act & Loose Construction Judiciary Act
a.2002-2003 -> Ushx: 4: Expanding West drill: Abolition & Emancipation Abolition
a.2002-2003 -> Ushx 1 The World Before the Opening of the Atlantic objectives


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