University Curriculum Committee Course Proposal Form for Courses Numbered 0001 – 4999



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University Curriculum Committee Course Proposal Form

for Courses Numbered 0001 – 4999

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Note: Before completing this form, please carefully read the accompanying instructions.
Submission guidelines are posted to the UCC Web site: www.ecu.edu/cs-acad/fsonline/cu/curriculum.cfm


CLAS 3405




  1. Course Prefix and Number:

January 26, 2012




  1. Date:




  1. Requested Action (Check only one type):




X

New Course




Revision of Active Course




Revision & Unbanking of a Banked Course




Renumbering of an Existing Course from

from

#

to

#




  1. Method(s) of delivery (check all boxes that apply for both current/proposed and expected future delivery methods within the next three years):

Current or Expected

Proposed Delivery Future Delivery

Method(s): Method(s):

X




On-campus (face to face)




X







Distance Course (face to face off campus)













Online (delivery of 50% or more of the instruction is offered online)










  1. Justification for new course, revision, unbanking, or renumbering:

The Classical Studies Faculty voted, based on assessment results, to modify CLAS 3400 to incorporate more literary material in the class, mirroring the methodology adopted in CLAS 2600 (which proposal is also included in this package), so as to paint a fuller picture of Roman culture. The new format did not allow sufficient time to incorporate the new material, and so it was decided to divide the course in half, 3400 on Rome during the Republic and 3405 on Rome during the Empire. The new course also meets a long-term goal of the Classical Studies Faculty to add 3000-level courses to our curriculum, a necessity because Multidisciplinary Studies majors need 24 s.h. above 2999 to graduate.



  1. Course description exactly as it should appear in the next catalog:

    3405. Roman Culture and Civilization: The Empire (3)

    Study of Ancient Rome, from the reign of Augustus to the reign of Caracalla, through its temples, monuments, topography and literature.



  2. If this is a course revision, briefly describe the requested change:

N/A



  1. Identify if the new/revised course will be a required and/or elective course in one of the degrees/minors/certificates offered by your unit.

No


Is this course required (yes/no)?



Yes

Is this course an elective (yes/no)?



  1. If writing intensive (WI) credit is requested, the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Committee must approve WI credit prior to consideration by the UCC.

N/A


Has this course been approved for WI credit (yes/no/NA)?






If Yes, will all sections be WI (yes/no/NA)?



  1. If service-learning (SL) credit is requested, the University Service-Learning Committee (USLC) must approve SL credit prior to consideration by the UCC.




N/A

Has this course been approved for SL credit (yes/no/NA)?





If Yes, will all sections be SL (yes/no/NA)?



  1. If foundations curriculum (FC) credit is requested, the Foundations Curriculum and Instructional Effectiveness (FCIE) Committee must approve FC credit prior to consideration by the UCC.


If FC credit has been approved by the FCIE committee, then check the appropriate box (check at most one):





English (EN)




Science (SC)




Humanities (HU)




Social Science (SO)




Fine Arts (FA)




Mathematics (MA)




Health (HL)




Exercise (EX)



  1. Course Credit:

Lecture Hours

3

Weekly

or




Per Term

=

Credit Hours

3

s.h.

Lab




Weekly

or




Per Term

=

Credit Hours




s.h.

Studio




Weekly

or




Per Term

=

Credit Hours




s.h.

Practicum




Weekly

or




Per Term

=

Credit Hours




s.h.

Internship




Weekly

or




Per Term

=

Credit Hours




s.h.


Other (e.g., independent study):




s.h.

Total Credit Hours

3

s.h.


116




  1. Anticipated yearly student enrollment:




  1. Affected Degrees or Academic Programs:


Degree(s)/Course(s)


PDF Catalog Page


Change in Degree Hours

Classical Studies Minor

82–83

None













  1. Overlapping or Duplication with Affected Units or Programs:




Not Applicable

X

Applicable (Notification and/or Response from Units Attached)




  1. Approval by the Council for Teacher Education (required for courses affecting teacher education programs):

X

Not Applicable




Applicable (CTE has given their approval)




  1. Instructional Format(s):

    X

    Lecture




    Technology-mediated




    Lab




    Seminar




    Studio




    Clinical




    Practicum




    Colloquium




    Internship




    Other (describe below):




    Student Teaching







  2. Statements of Support:


Please attach a memorandum, signed by the unit administrator, which addresses the budgetary and personnel impact of this proposal.


X

Current personnel is adequate




Additional personnel are needed (describe needs below):







X

Current facilities are adequate




Additional facilities are needed (describe needs below):







X

Initial library resources are adequate




Initial resources are needed (give a brief explanation and estimate for cost of acquisition of required resources below):







X

Unit computer resources are adequate




Additional unit computer resources are needed (give a brief explanation and an estimate for the cost of acquisition below):







X

ITCS Resources are not needed





Following ITCS resources are needed (put a check beside each need):





Mainframe computer system




Statistical services




Network connections




Computer lab for students

Describe any computer or networking requirements of this program that are not currently fully supported for existing programs (Includes use of classroom, laboratory, or other facilities that are not currently used in the capacity being requested).




Approval from the Director of ITCS attached




  1. Syllabus – please insert course syllabus below. Do not submit course syllabus as a separate file. You must include (a) the catalog description of the course as identified in #6 above (required) followed by an extended course description (optional), (b) the citation of the textbook chosen for the course including ISBN, (c) the course objectives, (d) the course content outline, and (e) the course assignments and grading plan. Do not include instructor- or semester-specific information in the syllabus.



a) 3405. Roman Culture and Civilization: The Empire (3)

Study of Ancient Rome, from the reign of Augustus to the reign of Caracalla, through its temples, monuments, topography and literature.


b) Textbooks.

  • The Aeneid of Virgil. Tr. Allen Mandelbaum. (U. California Press). ISBN: 0520254155

  • Petronius. The Satyricon and the Apocolocyntosis of the Divine Claudius. Tr. J.P. Sullivan (Penguin Classics) ISBN: 0140444890

  • Suetonius. The Twelve Caesars (Penguin Classics) ISBN: 0140455167

  • Tacitus. The Annals & The Histories. Tr. M. Hadas et al. (Modern Library Classics) ISBN: 0812966996

Additional Reading:



  • Website links to images, articles, and primary texts pertaining to each monument

  • Augustus. Res Gestae. Tr. Bushnell (Internet Classics Archive) http://classics.mit.edu/Augustus/deeds.html

  • Cicero. Dream of Scipio. Tr. Oliver Thatcher (Ancient History Sourcebook) http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/ancient/cicero-republic6.asp

  • Horace. Carmen Saeculare. Tr. A.S. Kline http://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/Latin/HoraceEpodesAndCarmenSaeculare.htm#_Toc98670048

  • Reserve: L. Richardson Jr., A New Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Johns Hopkins University Press (1992) 9780801843006

c) Course Objectives:


Foundations Goals:


  1. Humanities knowledge of the Classics. Students will be able to demonstrate foundational knowledge of Roman culture and civilization through study of literature, foundation myth, and biography as a means of understanding Roman monuments. Students will be able to: identify Roman monuments and demonstrate knowledge of their meaning and function as discovered in original literary sources; demonstrate knowledge of the main events in the development of Rome as a civilization through original literary and mythical sources; analyze literary and biographical sources for evidence of Rome’s self-conception; synthesize this information to formulate ideas of the role of iconography and literature in Roman identity.

  2. Research methodology in the Classics. Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to differentiate primary and secondary sources, and be able to articulate how scholars use primary sources to create knowledge. They will also demonstrate an ability to use primary sources to investigate the ancient world; specifically, they will demonstrate an ability to engage in close reading and analytical critique of literary, mytho-historical and biographical sources, as well as evidence from material culture. Students will also, via consultation of modern scholarship on Roman monuments and the most important databases by which to conduct further research, be able to demonstrate knowledge of the salient secondary sources.

  3. Contribution of Classics to general knowledge. Students will be able to discuss the classical origins of modern institutions and buildings, and how national identity is constructed by iconographic and literary programs.

d) Course Content Outline
Wk 1. Introduction. On days where “Website” is indicated, the homework is to consult the companion website to view images, read articles, or original source information linked from other websites.
Historical review and context. The death of Caesar, the affair of Marc Antony and Cleopatra, the battle of Actium. (Goal 1)
Wks. 2-4 Defining the new Roman government: The principate of Augustus (27 BC-14 AD).
Wk. 2. The princeps as defender and avenger: Forum of Augustus and Temple of Mars Ultor, Temple of the Divine Julius, evolution of iconography in coins. Read Vergil’s Aeneid, 12.1225-end; Augustus Res Gestae, esp. sections 2-3. 15, 19-21. (Goals 1,2)
The princeps as head of the family dynasty: Theatre of Marcellus, Mausoleum of Augustus, the Pantheon of Agrippa. Read Vergil’s Aeneid, 6.1148-end. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Wk. 3. The princeps as the embodiment of all virtues: the “shield of the virtues” (clipeus virtutum). Read Cicero Dream of Scipio esp. sections 13-15, 18-19, 23-24; Augustus Res Gestae 34-35. The divinity of the emperor as “astral immortality” (becoming a star, like Caesar’s comet). (Goals 1, 2, 3)
The princeps as “Sun-King”: The House of Augustus (Domus Augustana) and the Temple of Palatine Apollo. Read Vergil’s Aeneid 8.874-end; Augustus Res Gestae 19, 21, 24, 34-35. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Wk. 4. The “Roman peace” (pax Romana) and the start of a new golden age: the “secular games” (ludi saeculares) of 17 BC as the start of a new Roman “Golden age”; the “altar of peace” (Ara Pacis). Read Horace “Carmen Saeculare” and Vergil, Aeneid 1.354-417. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
The princeps as the guarantor of peace because of his limitless military power: the “Return of the Parthian Standards” and the statue of Augustus at Prima Porta. Website. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Wk. 5 Tiberius (14AD-37AD): The decadent emperor. Tiberius’ Villa and grotto at Sperlonga, Capri and Tiberius’ Villa Iovis, Death of Tiberius. Website. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Midterm Exam.
Wk. 6 Caligula (37-41 AD): The “condemnation of the memory of the emperor” (damnatio memoriae). Caligula’s pleasure barges at Nemi, their excavation and preservation by Mussolini, and destruction by the Nazis. Caligula’s statue of himself erected in Jerusalem. Website. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Claudius (41-54 AD): Roman Britain. Read Seneca’s “Apotheosis (divinization) of a pumpkin-head” (Apocolocyntosis). (Goals 1, 2)

Wk. 7 Nero (54-68 AD): The emperor as megalomaniac. Nero as Olympic solo vocalist (cytharoedus). The fire of 64 A.D. Nero’s “Golden House” (Domus Aurea) with its rotating celestial dining room (triclinium); 3rd style Roman painting; the Laocoon group; excavations. Nero’s suicide. Read Petronius’ Satyricon: the “Dinner of Trimalchio” (cena trimalchionis). (Goals 1, 2, 3)


Wk. 8. 69 AD. Year of four emperors (Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian). Read Tacitus’ Histories. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Vespasian (69-79 AD) and his son Titus (79-81 AD): The return of competence and sensitivity to the needs of the people. The Flavian dynasty. Vespasian’s sack of Jerusalem. Arch of Titus and the tradition of Roman Triumphal arches and their modern imitations. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Wk. 9. Bread and Circuses. Popular entertainments for the people. The Colisseum and gladiatorial combat. Website. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Racing and Vespasian’s rebuilding of the “greatest race-course” (Circus Maximus). Website. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Wk. 10. Domitian (81-96 AD). The suppression of the Christians and a return to tyranny. Domitian’s house (domus domitiana); Temple of Peace. The emperor’s body guard: the Praetorian Prefecture and the death of Domitian. Website. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Midterm Exam.
Wk. 11. Nerva (96-98 AD). The “adoptive emperors”. Nerva’s Forum Transitorium and temple of Minerva. Website. (Goals 1, 2)

Overview of the Imperial forums (fora). Website. (Goals 1, 2, 3)


Wk. 12. Trajan (98-117 AD). The conquest of Parthia (Iraq). The administration of justice, commerce, and the presence of the emperor. The Forum of Trajan and Basilica Ulpia (Marcus Ulpius Trajanus). Website. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
The Markets of Trajan, and triumphal Column of Trajan. Website. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Wk. 13. Overview of development in the Campus Martius: The Stadium of Domitian(piazza Navona). Website. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
The Baths of Nero and the tradition of Roman bath architecture. Website. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Wks. 14-15. Hadrian (117-138 AD): Apollodorus of Damascus, architect of the world’s largest and oldest dome, the Pantheon; the history of the re-use of the bronze roof tiles and sheathing in the canons of the Castel St. Angelo and the Baldachino. Website. (Goals 1, 2, 3)
Final Exam.

e) Course Assignments and Grading Plan


Two Midterms and Final Exam 1/3 each
Grading:

B+ 87-89 C+ 77-79 D+ 67-69

A 93-100 B 83-86 C 73-76 D 63-66 F 0-59

A- 90-92 B- 80-82 C- 70-72 D- 60-62




Faculty Senate Resolution #09-44, November 2009; editorially revised April 2011



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