United states securities and exchange commission


CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES



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CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The preparation of our financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. The application of the following accounting policies, which are important to our financial position and results of operations, requires significant judgments and estimates on the part of management. As described more fully below, these estimates bear the risk of change due to the inherent uncertainty attached to the estimate. In some cases, changes in the accounting estimates are reasonably likely to occur from period to period. Accordingly, actual results could differ materially from our estimates. For example, accounting for films and television programs requires us to estimate future revenue and expense amounts which, due to the inherent uncertainties involved in making such estimates, are likely to differ to some extent from actual results. To the extent that there are material differences between these estimates and actual results, our financial condition or results of operations will be affected. We base our estimates on past experience and other assumptions that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, and we evaluate these estimates on an ongoing basis. For a summary of all of our accounting policies, including the accounting policies discussed below, see Note 2 to our audited consolidated financial statements.



Accounting for Films and Television Programs. We capitalize costs of production and acquisition, including financing costs and production overhead, to investment in films and television programs. These costs for an individual film or television program are amortized and participation and residual costs are accrued to direct operating expenses in the proportion that current year’s revenues bear to management’s estimates of the ultimate revenue at the beginning of the year expected to be recognized from exploitation, exhibition or sale of such film or television program over a period not to exceed ten years from the date of initial release. For previously released film or television programs acquired as part of a library, ultimate revenue includes estimates over a period not to exceed 20 years from the date of acquisition.

Due to the inherent uncertainties involved in making such estimates of ultimate revenues and expenses, these estimates have differed in the past from actual results and are likely to differ to some extent in the future from actual results. In addition, in the normal course of our business, some films and titles are more successful than anticipated and some are less successful than anticipated. Our management regularly reviews and revises when necessary its ultimate revenue and cost estimates, which may result in a change in the rate of amortization of film costs and participations and residuals and/or write-down of all or a portion of the unamortized costs of the film or television program to its estimated fair value. Our management estimates the ultimate revenue based on experience with similar titles or title genre, the general public appeal of the cast, actual performance (when available) at the box office or in markets currently being exploited, and other factors such as the quality and acceptance of motion pictures or programs that our competitors release into the marketplace at or near the same time, critical reviews, general economic conditions and other tangible and intangible factors, many of which we do not control and which may change.



An increase in the estimate of ultimate revenue will generally result in a lower amortization rate and, therefore, less film and television program amortization expense, while a decrease in the estimate of ultimate revenue will generally result in a higher amortization rate and, therefore, higher film and television program amortization expense, and also periodically results in an impairment requiring a write-down of the film cost to the title’s fair value. These write-downs are included in amortization expense within direct operating expenses in our consolidated statements of operations.

Revenue Recognition. Revenue from the theatrical release of feature films is recognized at the time of exhibition based on our participation in box office receipts. Revenue from the sale of DVDs/Blu-ray discs in the retail market, net of an allowance for estimated returns and other allowances, is recognized on the later of receipt by the customer or “street date” (when it is available for sale by the customer). Under revenue sharing arrangements, rental revenue is recognized when we are entitled to receipts and such receipts are determinable. Revenues from television licensing are recognized when the feature film or television program is available to the licensee for telecast. For television licenses that include separate availability “windows” during the license period, revenue is allocated over the “windows.” Revenue from sales to international territories are recognized when access to the feature film or television program has been granted or delivery has occurred, as required under the sales contract, and the right to exploit the feature film or television program has commenced. For multiple media rights contracts with a fee for a single film or television program where the contract provides for media holdbacks (defined as contractual media release restrictions), the fee is allocated to the various media based on our assessment of the relative fair value of the rights to exploit each media and is recognized as each holdback is released. For multiple-title contracts with a fee, the fee is allocated on a title-by-title basis, based on our assessment of the relative fair value of each title. The primary estimate
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requiring the most subjectivity and judgment involving revenue recognition is the estimate of sales returns associated with our revenue from the sale of DVD’s/Blu-ray discs in the retail market which is discussed separately below under the caption “Sales Returns Allowance.”

Sales Returns Allowance. Revenues are recorded net of estimated returns and other allowances. We estimate reserves for DVD/Blu-ray returns based on previous returns experience, point-of-sale data available from certain retailers, current economic trends, and projected future sales of the title to the consumer based on the actual performance of similar titles on a title-by-title basis in each of the DVD/Blu-ray businesses. Factors affecting actual returns include, among other factors, limited retail shelf space at various times of the year, success of advertising or other sales promotions, and the near term release of competing titles. We believe that our estimates have been materially accurate in the past; however, due to the judgment involved in establishing reserves, we may have adjustments to our historical estimates in the future. Our estimate of future returns affects reported revenue and operating income. If we underestimate the impact of future returns in a particular period, then we may record less revenue in later periods when returns exceed the estimated amounts. If we overestimate the impact of future returns in a particular period, then we may record additional revenue in later periods when returns are less than estimated. An incremental change of 1% in our estimated sales returns rate (i.e., provisions for returns divided by gross sales of related product) for home entertainment products would have had an impact of approximately $7.0 million and $8.1 million on our total revenue in the fiscal years ended March 31, 2012 and March 31, 2011, respectively.

Provisions for Accounts Receivable. We estimate provisions for accounts receivable based on historical experience and relevant facts and information regarding the collectability of the accounts receivable. In performing this evaluation, significant judgments and estimates are involved, including an analysis of specific risks on a customer-by-customer basis for our larger customers and an analysis of the length of time receivables have been past due. The financial condition of a given customer and its ability to pay may change over time or could be better or worse than anticipated and could result in an increase or decrease to our allowance for doubtful accounts, which, when the impact of such change is material, is disclosed in our discussion on direct operating expenses elsewhere in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

Income Taxes. We are subject to federal and state income taxes in the U.S., and in several foreign jurisdictions. We record deferred tax assets, net of applicable reserves, related to net operating loss carryforwards and certain temporary differences. We recognize a future tax benefit to the extent that realization of such benefit is more likely than not or a valuation allowance is applied. In order to realize the benefit of our deferred tax assets we will need to generate sufficient taxable income in the future. Because of our historical operating losses, we have provided a full valuation allowance against our net deferred tax assets. However, the assessment as to whether there will be sufficient taxable income to realize our net deferred tax assets is an estimate which could change in the future depending primarily upon the actual performance of our Company. When we have a history of profitable operations sufficient to demonstrate that it is more likely than not that our deferred tax assets will be realized, the valuation allowance or a portion of the valuation allowance will be reversed and reflected as a benefit in the income tax provision. After that, we will be required to continually evaluate the more likely than not assessment that our net deferred tax assets will be realized, and if operating results deteriorate, we may need to reestablish all or a portion of the valuation allowance through a charge to our income tax provision.

Goodwill. Goodwill is reviewed annually for impairment each fiscal year or between the annual tests if an event occurs or circumstances change that indicate it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying value. We perform our annual impairment test as of January 1 in each fiscal year. We performed our last annual impairment test on our goodwill as of January 1, 2012. No goodwill impairment was identified in any of our reporting units. Determining the fair value of reporting units requires various assumptions and estimates. The estimates of fair value include consideration of the future projected operating results and cash flows of the reporting unit. Such projections could be different than actual results. Should actual results be significantly less than estimates, the value of our goodwill could be impaired in the future.

Convertible Senior Subordinated Notes. We account for our convertible senior subordinated notes by separating the liability and equity components. The liability component is recorded at the date of issuance based on its fair value which is generally determined in a manner that will reflect an interest cost equal to our nonconvertible debt borrowing rate at the convertible senior subordinated notes issuance date. The amount of the proceeds, less the amount recorded as the liability component, is recorded as an addition to shareholders’ equity reflecting the equity component (i.e., conversion feature). The difference between the principal amount and the amount recorded as the liability component represents the debt discount. The carrying amount of the liability is accreted up to the principal amount through the amortization of the discount, using the effective interest method, to interest expense over the expected life of the note. The determination of the fair value of the liability component is an estimate dependent on a number of factors, including estimates of market rates for similar nonconvertible debt instruments at the date of issuance. A higher value attributable to the liability component results in a lower value attributed to the equity component and therefore a smaller discount amount and lower interest cost as a result of amortization of the smaller discount. A lower value attributable to the liability component results in a higher value attributed to
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the equity component and therefore a larger discount amount and higher interest cost as a result of amortization of the larger discount.

Business Acquisitions. We account for business acquisitions as a purchase, whereby the purchase price is allocated to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their estimated fair value. The excess of the purchase price over estimated fair value of the net identifiable assets is allocated to goodwill. Determining the fair value of assets and liabilities requires various assumptions and estimates. These estimates and assumptions are refined with adjustments recorded to goodwill as information is gathered and final appraisals are completed over a one-year allocation period. The changes in these estimates or different assumptions used in determining these estimates could impact the amount of assets, including goodwill and liabilities, ultimately recorded on our balance sheet and could impact our operating results subsequent to such acquisition. We believe that our assumptions and estimates have been materially accurate in the past.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

We adopted Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") No. 2011-08 “Testing Goodwill for Impairment” for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2012. ASU 2011-08 simplifies how entities test goodwill for impairment and permits an entity to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount as a basis for determining whether it is necessary to perform the two-step goodwill impairment test. The adoption of ASU 2011-08 did not have an impact on our consolidated financial statements.

In June 2011, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued an accounting standard update relating to the presentation of other comprehensive income. The accounting update eliminates the option to present components of other comprehensive income as part of the statement of stockholders’ equity. Instead, companies must report comprehensive income in either a single continuous statement of comprehensive income (which would contain the current income statement presentation followed by the components of other comprehensive income and a total amount for comprehensive income), or in two separate but consecutive statements. This guidance is effective for our fiscal year beginning April 1, 2012. We do not expect the guidance to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

In May 2011, the FASB issued an accounting standard update related to fair value measurements and disclosures to improve the comparability of fair value measurements presented and disclosed in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards. This guidance includes amendments that clarify the intent about the application of existing fair value measurement requirements, while other amendments change a principle or requirement for measuring fair value or for disclosing information about fair value measurements. Specifically, the guidance requires additional disclosures for fair value measurements that are based on significant unobservable inputs. The updated guidance is to be applied prospectively and is effective for our interim and annual periods beginning April 1, 2012. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS



Fiscal 2012 Compared to Fiscal 2011

The following table sets forth the components of consolidated revenue by segment for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 :



 


















































 

Year Ended

 

Year Ended

 

Increase (Decrease)

 

March 31, 2012

 

March 31, 2011

 

Amount

 

Percent

 

 

 

(Amounts in millions)

 

 

Consolidated Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Motion Pictures

$

1,190.3




 

$

1,229.5




 

$

(39.2

)

 

(3.2

)%

Television Production

397.3




 

353.2




 

44.1




 

12.5

 %

 

$

1,587.6




 

$

1,582.7




 

$

4.9




 

0.3

 %

Our largest component of revenue comes from home entertainment. The following table sets forth total home entertainment revenue for both the Motion Pictures and Television Production reporting segments for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2012 and 2011 :

 


















































 

Year Ended

 

Year Ended

 

Increase (Decrease)

 

March 31, 2012

 

March 31, 2011

 

Amount

 

Percent

 

 

 

(Amounts in millions)

 

 

Home Entertainment Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Motion Pictures

$

582.0




 

$

635.6




 

$

(53.6

)

 

(8.4

)%

Television Production

101.5




 

54.4




 

47.1




 

86.6

 %

 

$

683.5




 

$

690.0




 

$

(6.5

)

 

(0.9

)%




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