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Unit Background

Unit Title: Indian Spanish heritage

Subject Area: Special Topics (Mexican-American Studies)

Topic: Mesoamerica to the Spanish conquest and mission system.

Designed by:

 Juan Carmona



Time Frame: 1st Six Weeks (August 25-October, 3)

Brief Summary: 

      This Unit covers Mesoamerica from the Toltecs to the Aztecs and the Spanish conquest into the hacienda and mission system.



Part I: Desired Results

Goal

 The student will understand the origins of the Mexican-American people and the Latin society which emerged with the result of the Spanish conquest of the Americas.




Big Idea

 How the Mexican people are the result of the merging of two cultures, the Spanish and the indigenous people of the Americas.



Standards (TEKS/CCRS)

(1)  Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply social studies methodologies encompassing a variety of research and analytical tools to explore questions or issues thoroughly and fairly to include multiple perspectives;

(B)  evaluate effects of major political, economic, and social conditions on a selected social studies topic;

(C)  appraise a geographic perspective that considers physical and cultural processes as they affect the selected topic;

(D)  examine the role of diverse communities in the context of the selected topic;

(E)  analyze ethical issues raised by the selected topic in historic, cultural, and social contexts;

(F)  depending on the topic, use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(G)  depending on the topic, use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.

(2)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  locate, analyze, organize, synthesize, evaluate, and apply information about the selected topic, identifying, describing, and evaluating multiple points of view;

(B)  differentiate between valid primary and secondary sources and use them appropriately to conduct research and construct arguments;

(C)  read narrative texts critically and identify points of view from the historical context surrounding an event and the frame of reference that influenced the participants;

(D)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;

(E)  collect visual images (photographs, paintings, political cartoons, and other media) to enhance understanding and appreciation of multiple perspectives in a social studies topic;

(F)  identify bias in written, oral, and visual material;

(G)  evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author; and

(H)  use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

(3)  Social studies skills. The student creates written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply the conventions of usage and mechanics of written English;

(B)  use social studies terminology correctly;

(C)  use appropriate oral communication techniques;

(D)  construct a thesis that is supported by evidence;

(E)  recognize and evaluate counter arguments;

(F)  use visual images (photographs, paintings, and other media) to facilitate understanding and appreciation of multiple perspectives in a social studies topic;

(G)  develop a bibliography with ideas and information attributed to source materials and authors using accepted social science formats such as Modern Language Association Style Manual (MLA) andChicago Manual of Style (CMS) to document sources and format written materials; and

(H)  use computer software to create written, graphic, or visual products from collected data.

CCRS


ELPS
1A I’ll use what I already know to figure out what some words mean

1D When I don’t know how to say something, I’ll

Ask for help

Use my hands or pictures

Use a word that is kind of like what I mean

Explain or describe what I’m trying to say

1E I’ll use new words when I speak and write in class so that I’ll learn them well

2A I’ll be able to hear the sounds and rhythm of English better

2E I’ll use visuals and context so I can understand people who are using complex language when they speak

3A I’ll practice pronouncing new words so that others can understand me better

3D When I speak, I’ll use words that are related to this class

4C I’ll recognize sight words and read material used in my class

4D Before I read, I’ll use graphic organizers, illustrations, vocabulary lists and other strategies so I can understand better

5B When I write, I’ll use new basic words and new vocabulary about this subject

5C I’ll spell words correctly more and more often

 


Enduring Understandings

  •  - Colonialism affects both the colonizer and the colonized

  • - What was the “Columbian Exchange” and its global societal and economic affects

  • - The conquest was a result of more than the actions of just a few hundred conquistadores.

  • -  Advanced civilization existed on all corners of the globe.

  • - The accomplishments of the Mesoamerican people which affect us till this day.




Misunderstandings (optional)     

Essential Questions

  •  - What is a Mexican?

  • - What is a Mexican American?

  • - What is cultural identity?

  • -  Do we see Mesoamerican contribution in our everyday lives?

  • - What is civilization?

  • - What is an advanced civilization?

  • - What is a barbarian?

  • - Why do empires rise and fall?

  • What is historical bias?



Knowledge

Important

  • Mesoamerican technology

  • Mesoamerican society

  • Reasons for European exploration

  • Reasons for being a conquistador.

  • Mesoamerican Religion

  • La Malinche

  • encomendia

  • repartimiento

  • Spanish expansion

  • El Dorado

  • Hacienda

  • Buffer state

  • Pueblo Revolt

  • The Frontier

  • Spanish Mission system

Supporting

  • Silver Barons

  • alliances

  • Noche Triste

  • diseases

  • Reconquista







Part II: Assessment Evidence

Performance Task: Students will use the Persian Chart to create a poster board highlighting the aspects of a given Mesoamerican culture or that of Spain at the time of the conquest.

  • Students will pair research their given topic via the internet and textbook ascertaining information which will complete their Persian chart for their given civilization.

  • Students will create a visual representation for each aspect of the Persian chart.

  • Students will then be paired off with a different culture present each culture to the class and debate which one is better and more impactful.

***** copy of Persian chart attached at the end of the unit

 

Criteria used in rubric: (SS Rubric v5 doc)



  • Presentation

  • Accurate information

  • Neatness

  • argumentation


Core Challenge: Students will understand the complexity of Mesoamerican and Spanish civilization

 


Other Assesments:

 Multiple Choice Exams, Quizzes, Interactive notebooks, presentations and Short Answer Questions




Part III: Instructional Strategies and Learning Experiences


Week 1: Mesoamerica reading to be found online at History World : http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?groupid=1833&HistoryID=ab58>rack=pthc


TEKS: (1)  Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply social studies methodologies encompassing a variety of research and analytical tools to explore questions or issues thoroughly and fairly to include multiple perspectives;

(B)  evaluate effects of major political, economic, and social conditions on a selected social studies topic;

(C)  appraise a geographic perspective that considers physical and cultural processes as they affect the selected topic;

(D)  examine the role of diverse communities in the context of the selected topic;

(2)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(D)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;

(E)  collect visual images (photographs, paintings, political cartoons, and other media) to enhance understanding and appreciation of multiple perspectives in a social studies topic;

(3)  Social studies skills. The student creates written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information. The student is expected to:

F)  use visual images (photographs, paintings, and other media) to facilitate understanding and appreciation of multiple perspectives in a social studies topic;

Lesson:

• Students will understand the locations and accomplishments of the Mesoamerican civilizations.

Students will understand the influence of the Olmec’s upon later civilizations

Activity

• Students will create a foldable categorizing the Mesoamerican civilizations into categories such as religion, accomplishments, geographic locations, and government

• Students will examine the codices found on http://www.library.arizona.edu/exhibits/mexcodex/intro.htm

and attempt to understand the story being told and tell a personal story using only visual representations.

• Students will work with chapter’s vocabulary both defining the terms and creating visual representations for the words.

• Students will use Jot Thoughts to explore possible negative and positive consequences of the Spanish conquest of Mexico




Kagan Strategies: Jot Thoughts

·                         



Week 2:

A History of the Mexican American People Chapter 3. Conquest of Mexico
TEKS:

(1)  Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply social studies methodologies encompassing a variety of research and analytical tools to explore questions or issues thoroughly and fairly to include multiple perspectives;

(B)  evaluate effects of major political, economic, and social conditions on a selected social studies topic;

(C)  appraise a geographic perspective that considers physical and cultural processes as they affect the selected topic;

(D)  examine the role of diverse communities in the context of the selected topic;

(E)  analyze ethical issues raised by the selected topic in historic, cultural, and social contexts;

(F)  depending on the topic, use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(G)  depending on the topic, use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision

(2)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  locate, analyze, organize, synthesize, evaluate, and apply information about the selected topic, identifying, describing, and evaluating multiple points of view;

(B)  differentiate between valid primary and secondary sources and use them appropriately to conduct research and construct arguments;

(C)  read narrative texts critically and identify points of view from the historical context surrounding an event and the frame of reference that influenced the participants;

(D)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;



(F)  identify bias in written, oral, and visual material;

(3)  Social studies skills. The student creates written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply the conventions of usage and mechanics of written English;

(B)  use social studies terminology correctly;

(C)  use appropriate oral communication techniques;

(D)  construct a thesis that is supported by evidence;

(E)  recognize and evaluate counter arguments;

(F)  use visual images (photographs, paintings, and other media) to facilitate understanding and appreciation of multiple perspectives in a social studies topic;

(G)  develop a bibliography with ideas and information attributed to source materials and authors using accepted social science formats such as Modern Language Association Style Manual (MLA) and Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) to document sources and format written materials; and

(H)  use computer software to create written, graphic, or visual products from collected data.



Lesson:

• Students will understand the reasons for the Spanish exploration of the New World

• Students will understand what a conquistador was.

• Students will learn about La Malinche and the controversy surrounding her.

• Students will learn about the birth of the first Mexican

Students will understand the various factors behind the fall of the Aztec empire.

Students will explore the various means by which the Spanish sought to Hispanisize the indigenous peoples of the Americas.
Activity:

• Students will work in pairs and create a timeline of the events of the conquest of Mexico

•Students will create a T comparison chart between the Spanish and Aztecs as to warfare: weapons used, tactics, and numbers

• Writing/ Reading Prompt: Students will write an essay persuading the reader that either La Malinche was traitor to her people or was attempting to serve her people.

• Reading comprehension: students will attempt to write a 50 word bio of La Malinche and Hernan Cortes

.and Bartoleme de la Casas


·                                                



Week 3:     

A History of the Mexican-American People Chapter 4. Dreamers Schemers

TEKS:

(1)  Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply social studies methodologies encompassing a variety of research and analytical tools to explore questions or issues thoroughly and fairly to include multiple perspectives;

(B)  evaluate effects of major political, economic, and social conditions on a selected social studies topic;

(C)  appraise a geographic perspective that considers physical and cultural processes as they affect the selected topic;

(D)  examine the role of diverse communities in the context of the selected topic;

(E)  analyze ethical issues raised by the selected topic in historic, cultural, and social contexts;

(F)  depending on the topic, use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution;



2)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(D)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions

Lesson:

Student will understand the drive towards Spanish expansion into the Southwestern United States and Southern Mexico

Student will learn about the power struggle between the conquistadores like Cortes and the Spanish crown.

Student will learn about the early Spanish Missionaries as they went out in search of converts.


Suggested Activities:
Students will learn how to do Cornell Notes and use the skill to take chapter notes.

Students will create a poster board depicting facts about the different Spanish explorers and where they explored into.

Students will create a cause and effect chart depicting how life changed for the indigenous peoples of the Americas after the Spanish invasion.

·                                        



Week 4: A History of the Mexican-American People Chapter 5. Farms and Forts-Expanding Settlement.

TEKS:

  1. Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(B)  evaluate effects of major political, economic, and social conditions on a selected social studies topic;

F)  depending on the topic, use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and
Lesson:

  • Student will understands the economic shift from mining to agriculture in Mexico.

  • Student will earn about the hacienda system.

  • Students will learn about the emergence of New World Aristocrats.

  • Students will learn about the constant threat of raids by Native Americans.


Suggested Activities:


  • Students will use Cornell notes to take notes as they read the chapter.

  • Students will create a graphic organizer depicting the various facets of the hacienda system

  • Students create a Venn Diagram outlining pros and cons of switching from mining to agriculture for both owners and workers.

                        

                                   


Week 5: A History of the Mexican-American People Chapter 6 The Buffer State

TEKS:

  1. Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

A)  apply social studies methodologies encompassing a variety of research and analytical tools to explore questions or issues thoroughly and fairly to include multiple perspectives;

(B)  evaluate effects of major political, economic, and social conditions on a selected social studies topic;



(2)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  locate, analyze, organize, synthesize, evaluate, and apply information about the selected topic, identifying, describing, and evaluating multiple points of view;

(D)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;

(3)  Social studies skills. The student creates written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information. The student is expected to:

(E)  recognize and evaluate counter arguments;

Lesson


  • Students will learn about the establishment of a new colony in modern day New Mexico.

  • Students will understand the difficulties the Spanish faced colonizing New Mexico

  • Students will understand the factors which led to the revolt of the Pueblo Indians

Suggested Activities:

Students will 2 diary entries one from the point of view of the Pueblo Indians during Spanish occupation. The other from the point of view of a Spanish colonists


  • Students will create a recruitment poster for Pueblos to join the revolt against the Spanish.

  • Students will research further into the Pueblo tribe and compare and contrast Pueblo society with Spanish society using a T chart

·                                                 

Week 6: A History of the Mexican-American People Chapter 7 Mission Settlements

TEKS:

  1. Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply social studies methodologies encompassing a variety of research and analytical tools to explore questions or issues thoroughly and fairly to include multiple perspectives;

(B)  evaluate effects of major political, economic, and social conditions on a selected social studies topic;

(C)  appraise a geographic perspective that considers physical and cultural processes as they affect the selected topic;

(D)  examine the role of diverse communities in the context of the selected topic;

(E)  analyze ethical issues raised by the selected topic in historic, cultural, and social contexts;

(F)  depending on the topic, use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution;



(2)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(D)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;



Lesson

Students will learn about the various Spanish settlements in New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, and California and why they were implemented.

Students will understand the factors as to why the Mission system was more successful in California.

Students will understand the factors which led to the decline of the Mission system



Suggested Activities:

Students will read and take Cornell notes on unit.

Students will research and create biographies for the various tribes who participated in the Mission system.

Students will utilize Jot Thoughts to discuss the pros and cons of the Mission system on Native American society.

·                                     



Tier III Vocabulary

(Key Content Words)

 Tier III Vocabulary



(Key Content Words)

 

conquistador



indigenous

Far East


colonial

vessel


smallpox

campaign


alliance

Native tongue

translator

converting

dowry

hispanization



deity

utopía


tutelage

encomienda

congreciones

papacy


hinterland

creoles


peninsulares

bureaucracy

prospectors

mercantilism

quinto

aristocracy



cultivation

irrigation

hacienda

hacendados

raids

garrison


mestizo

buffer


provision

viceroy


Southwest

Strife


Clemency

·                         



 Tier II Vocabulary

(words required for mature conversation across subjects)
Expedition

conqueror

Enacted

Immune system

fierce

disease

conquest

supernatural

establish

Displaced

Emulation

Manufacturing

welfare

fatalism

abhorred

abolished

constituted

schemer

zealous

bastions

epic


barren

disillusion

foreclosure

pacification

frontier


 Tier I Vocabulary

(basic words, often unfamiliar to ELLs)

Administration

fabric


boundaries

superstition

salvation

Develop

Manufacture

 Halted



Livestock

Yielded

Laborer

Servitude

hardship
 

Resources

  Textbook and Print Resources:

A History of Mexican American People

HistoryWorld.net (http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?groupid=1833&HistoryID=ab58>rack=pthc)

University of Arizona Codices online exhibit (http://www.library.arizona.edu/exhibits/mexcodex/intro.htm)

PERSIAN Chart
Sheltered Instruction Strategies: Peer tutoring, word bank, extended time, limited response

·                         



 

 

 



Persian Chart

Political

  • Leaders, Elites

  • State Structure

  • War

  • Diplomacy, Treaties

  • Courts, Laws

Economic

  • Type of System

  • Technology, Industry

  • Trade, Commerce

  • Capital/Money

  • Types of Business

Religious

  • Holy Books

  • Beliefs, Teachings

  • Conversion

  • Sin/Salvation

  • Deities

Social

  • Family

  • Gender Relations

  • Social Classes

  • Inequalities

  • Life Styles

Intellectual, Cultural

  • Art, Music

  • Writing, Literature

  • Philosophy

  • Math & Science

  • Education

Near: Geography

  • Location

  • Physical

  • Movement

  • Human/Environment

  • Region


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