Unit 6 Exam Short Answer Critical Thinking Making Inferences


Unit 6 Exam Answer Section



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Unit 6 Exam

Answer Section
SHORT ANSWER
1. ANS:

Answers will vary but should recognize the differentiating characteristics of both types. By inferring that NOW would likely focus on women's issues and roles, some students may label it a single-issue party. By noting that women's issues cover a broad range, some of which involve major social changes, other students may suggest it would be an ideological party.

PTS: 1 DIF: C REF: Page 455

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, page 455, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 16, Section 1.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


2. ANS:

Such parties would increase the alternatives from which voters realistically could choose. They would give voters whose needs are not met by the major parties a greater and more meaningful voice in the electoral process. They would thus expand democracy by increasing the power and influence of groups with special interests outside the mainstream of two-party politics.

PTS: 1 DIF: A REF: Pages 455-57

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, pages 455-57, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 16, Section 1.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


3. ANS:

Answers will vary but students should recognize that expanding suffrage may extend voting rights to a greater percentage of people who are less interested in the political system or who, for some other reason, choose not to participate.

PTS: 1 DIF: A REF: Pages 496-97

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, pages 496-97, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 17, Section 3.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


4. ANS:

Campaign finance laws limit the contributions that a PAC or a wealthy individual can make to a candidate. There were no such limits on "soft money," however, which the person or PAC could contribute to the candidate's party to be used on the candidate's behalf.

PTS: 1 DIF: C REF: Pages 478-79

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, pages 478-79, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 17, Section 1.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


5. ANS:

Answers will vary but should recognize television's great power as a shaper of public opinion. Students should connect the image portrayed by TV with the perpetuation or elimination of stereotypes and the effect of that process on a group's acceptance by society.

PTS: 1 DIF: A REF: Page 515

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, page 515, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 18, Section 3.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


6. ANS:

The spread of cable TV, cell phones, the Internet, and other technological advances have made many existing regulations, such as those allocating the broadcast spectrum, antiquated. Many of the changes also increased competition. Students should note three such changes or others aimed at harassment or obscenity through the airwaves.

PTS: 1 DIF: C REF: Pages 539-40

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, pages 539-40, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 19, Section 2.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


7. ANS:

Parties spread their positions on the important issues and attack the views of the opposition. This process helps to inform the electorate about the choices available to them. Parties also simplify the choice of candidates because they identify the Republican, Democrat, and third party candidates, while pointing out their positions on the issues.

PTS: 1 DIF: A REF: Pages 461-62

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, pages 461-62, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 16, Section 2.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


8. ANS:

Campaign finance reform would require the support of a majority in both houses of Congress in order to change the law. Incumbent lawmakers, who benefit the most from the current system, are not eager to reform it. Powerful interest groups also would lobby against any proposed reform that would reduce the influence of their PACs.

PTS: 1 DIF: C REF: Pages 477-79

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, pages 477-79, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 17, Section 1.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


9. ANS:

Eliminating poll taxes and literacy tests has resulted in both an increase in African American voters and officeholders, including the mayor's office in several major cities. In addition, the laws' prohibition of gerrymandering to reduce African American influence has increased the power of black voters.

PTS: 1 DIF: C REF: Page 484

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, page 484, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 17, Section 2.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


10. ANS:

Answers will vary. However, the incumbent, with a record to run on, might be more able to raise money from groups that are pleased by his or her stand on certain issues than would a challenger. Some students might suggest that the challenger could have an advantage if the incumbent's record displeases powerful interest groups.

PTS: 1 DIF: A REF: Pages 477-79

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, pages 477-79, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 17, Section 1.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


11. ANS:

The greatest advantage is that the lobbyist can provide expert information on the issue. (Some students may also suggest that the legislator might get financial support from the lobbyist's PAC.) The greatest drawback is that the lobbyist's information will biased and not be an objective assessment of the issue.

PTS: 1 DIF: C REF: Pages 508-09

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, pages 508-09, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 18, Section 2.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


12. ANS:

A liberal would favor regulation in the interest of consumer protection and equal opportunity. A conservative would limit regulation and count on the industry to take the lead in solving the affordability problem. A libertarian would oppose any regulation of fares.

PTS: 1 DIF: C REF: Page 517

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, page 517, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 18, Section 3.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


13. ANS:

They contribute money through their PACs, which also can win them access and influence with legislators. They buy media, such as newspaper or television, advertising to influence public opinion. (Accept any other interest group public policy activities that students can legitimately tie to finances.)

PTS: 1 DIF: C REF: Page 513

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, page 513, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 18, Section 2.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


14. ANS:

Answers will vary, but students should note that whoever owns the media can influence the messages their media present and thus control the information available to voters. This can have an impact on the democratic process.

PTS: 1 DIF: A REF: Pages 538-39

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, pages 538-39, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 19, Section 2.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


15. ANS:

Because the Internet gives anyone with a personal computer the ability to spread their ideas to a global audience, the government must find a way to protect children from obscene or offensive content online without trampling the free-speech rights of adults. The government must also make decisions about whether or not to tax E-commerce or the sale of goods and services online.



PTS: 1 DIF: A REF: Pages 546-47

NOT: Learn more about this question in United States Government: Democracy in Action, pages 546-47, and in the Reading Essentials and Study Guide, Chapter 19, Section 3.  For additional practice, visit this book's Online Learning Center at glencoe.com.


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