Unit 1: Introduction to Selection and Assessment



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Title

Unit 1: Introduction to Selection and Assessment

Description

Personnel Selection and Assessment Module

Keywords




Objectives




Author

Psychology

Organisation

University of Leicester

Version

V1.0

Date

16 Feb 2010

Copyright






UNIT 1: LEARNING OUTCOMES
On completion of this unit students will be able to:


  1. Describe the content of the module




  1. Describe the contribution that occupational psychologists can make to the design, development and improvement of selection processes




  1. Discuss a variety of selection techniques




  1. Discuss some of the important practical and theoretical issues in the study of selection techniques




  1. Describe selection as a two-way process




  1. Describe the key elements of the research methods module that apply to the study of selection and assessment



1.1. INTRODUCTION TO PERSONNEL SELECTION AND ASSESSMENT
This unit looks at the key components of the selection process. We start to look at selection as a two-way process, an issue that is often overlooked by students. Remember, in any selection process an organisation will reach a decision about a candidate but the candidate will also reach a decision about the organisation (e.g. whether to apply for the job, and whether to accept a job offer if they are successful in the selection process).
In this unit we highlight how knowledge and theory from occupational psychology can be used to build good selection processes. This analysis sets the agenda for the remainder of the module. This unit is also designed to orientate you to a variety of selection tools. Although a detailed discussion of them is saved for later units, there is some preliminary analysis of some of the strengths and weaknesses of different ways of selecting employees.
As psychologists, we tend to build our interventions on good psychological theory: it’s what makes us different to other practitioners who get involved in selection processes. Fortunately there is no shortage of theory for us to draw upon, but it is often challenging to translate that theory into usable, practical selection tools. Our practice not only needs to be technically good enough, it also has to be ethical and practical. After all, a theoretically robust method of selection is of little use if it is too costly or disruptive to deliver. The material in this unit begins the examination of these important issues that run throughout the module.


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