Unified government



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Name: __________________________ Date: _____________



1.

The texts suggests “unified government” might be

A)

something of a myth.

B)

impossible in the American system of government.

C)

possible only in a multi-party system.

D)

the only way to implement significant legislation.

E)

one way to ensure intelligent policy making.



2.

When no candidate receives a majority of votes in the electoral college, the House of Representatives decides who will win a presidential election. This circumstance

A)

has never occurred.

B)

has occurred only twice.

C)

occurs once every 28 to 36 years.

D)

has occurred four times in this century.

E)

occurs frequently when the country is at war.



3.

The Framers solved the problem of how to elect the president by

A)

forming a quasi-parliamentary system of government.

B)

providing for constitutional amendments.

C)

forming the House Election Committee.

D)

creating the Committee on Detail.

E)

creating the Electoral College.



4.

The Framers assumed that, under the electoral college system, most presidential elections would be decided in the House. Why did this not turn out to be the case?

A)

Because most elections were not close enough to give state delegations the power to decide the outcome

B)

Because the first Supreme Court ruled unconstitutional the electoral college system for selecting a president

C)

Because political parties ended up playing a major role in producing nationwide support for a slate of national candidates

D)

Because the Senate quickly usurped the delegate powers of the House

E)

Because the Supreme Court narrowly interpreted the powers of the legislative branch.



5.

The legitimacy of the office of president was aided during the years of the first presidents by which of the following?

A)

The limit placed on the number of terms a president could serve

B)

The minimal role played by the early government

C)

The rise in power of political caucuses

D)

The close relationship that developed between the president and Congress

E)

Narrow interpretations of the Constitution by the United States Supreme Court



6.

Which of the following statements is incorrect?

A)

In order to win an election, a candidate must receive at least half of the votes of the electoral college.

B)

Each state receives an electoral vote for each member it has in the House and the Senate.

C)

In some states, electoral votes can be split.

D)

State electors assemble in Washington to cast their ballots.

E)

Electoral ballots are opened before a joint session of Congress during the first week in January.



7.

When we say that a powerful presidency has been institutionalized, we mean that its power is no longer dependent on

A)

Congress.

B)

personality.

C)

legitimacy.

D)

the U.S. Constitution.

E)

Executive Orders.



8.

The Senate is required to confirm all of the following presidential nominations except

A)

members of the White House Office.

B)

the heads of Executive Office agencies.

C)

the heads of cabinet departments.

D)

lower federal court judges.

E)

Supreme Court justices.



9.

With respect to advice, most presidents discover that it is best to

A)

adopt an ad hoc structure among staff.

B)

be a kind of wheel hub for numerous assistants (spokes).

C)

rely heavily on one or two key subordinates.

D)

allow high levels of access for all who are interested in having the president's ear.

E)

seek out the advice of most cabinet members.



10.

Which of the following statements about the collegial nature of deliberations at cabinet meetings is true?

A)

It has been consistent throughout most of its history.

B)

It is increasingly important, but only when discussions are related to economic issues.

C)

It is more important now than it originally was.

D)

It was more important originally than it is now.

E)

It is largely a fiction.



11.

What distinguishes executive and independent agencies?

A)

Where they are located

B)

Whether they report to Congress

C)

How they are funded

D)

The number of their employees

E)

The distinction is not altogether clear



12.

Until the 1930s, the pattern of U.S. legislation was that

A)

little initiative was taken by the president or Congress.

B)

initiative was taken by the president and Congress about equally.

C)

initiative was taken by the president and responded to by Congress.

D)

initiative was taken by Congress and responded to by the president.

E)

initiative was taken by the president with the advice and consent of Congress.



13.

Relationships between White House staff and department heads are typically characterized by

A)

the revolving door.

B)

teamwork.

C)

mutual noninterference.

D)

tension and rivalry.

E)

reciprocity.



14.

Personality plays a more important role in explaining the presidency than it does in explaining Congress because a president is

A)

more likely to rely on hands-on politics and persuasiveness to enact policy.

B)

less constrained by the rules and roles that operate within government.

C)

more likely to be judged by his character in addition to his accomplishments.

D)

relatively immune from public opinion and polls.

E)

less constrained by the judiciary or current notions of constitutional principles.



15.

When a president makes fire-and-brimstone speeches confirming a shared sense of purpose, he is appealing principally to

A)

fellow politicians.

B)

the media.

C)

partisan activists at the state and local levels.

D)

the general public.

E)

fellow leaders.



16.

Although Republicans gained seats in the House in 1980 and 1984, political scientists are reluctant to conclude that the gains were due to presidential coattails because

A)

so many Republican candidates opposed Reagan and his conservative ideology.

B)

Reagan had sought to punish so many disloyal Republican candidates.

C)

congressional elections are frequently insulated from presidential elections.

D)

Reagan had rejected the Republican platform on which so many Republican candidates were running.

E)

All of the above.



17.

Which of the following statements is incorrect?

A)

George Bush entered office with an approval rating similar to the initial rating of Bill Clinton.

B)

Bush had the highest disapproval rating of any president since such polling began.

C)

Bush's approval ratings for the first six months were quite typical of post 1960 presidents.

D)

Bush received the highest approval rating ever recorded in the aftermath of the attack of September 11.

E)

None of the above.



18.

Veto power and executive privilege give a president both a way of blocking action and a

A)

route of appeal to the people.

B)

means of affecting the party platform.

C)

trump card to play with the media.

D)

means of forcing Congress to bargain.

E)

means of overriding the influence of special interests.



19.

If by December 30 the president does not sign a bill that was sent to him by Congress on December 24, he has probably

A)

used his pocket veto.

B)

vetoed it.

C)

let it become law without his signature.

D)

tabled it.

E)

amended it.



20.

When President Reagan was governor of California, he could veto portions of a bill that were irrelevant to the subject of the bill. He was exercising what is called

A)

constitutional discretion.

B)

a pocket veto.

C)

states' rights.

D)

gubernatorial averaging.

E)

a line-item veto.



21.

United States v. Nixon held that there is

A)

no executive privilege.

B)

absolute presidential immunity from judicial process.

C)

no unqualified presidential privilege of immunity from judicial process.

D)

real but limited presidential immunity from judicial process.

E)

presidential immunity does not apply to matters which are civil in nature.



22.

On the issue of a president's right to impound funds, the U.S. Constitution says

A)

that a president must spend the money that Congress appropriates.

B)

that a president does not have to spend money that Congress appropriates.

C)

that a president may spend money that Congress does not appropriate.

D)

that a president may spend money that Congress does not appropriate if congressional leaders support such expenditures.

E)

nothing.



23.

A president suffers a stroke but nevertheless wants to remain in office. The vice president and cabinet disagree. Who decides whether the president should continue to serve?

A)

The president

B)

The vice president and cabinet

C)

Congress

D)

The Supreme Court

E)

A writ of mandamus



24.

Which of the following would not be a good rule of thumb for a newly elected president?

A)

Move to implement programs quickly.

B)

Avoid dealing with interest groups.

C)

Avoid getting involved in too many details.

D)

Rely on capable aides.

E)

Do not rely on the cabinet.



25.

The principal function of the White House Office is to

A)

oversee the political and policy interests of the president.

B)

administer federal departments as the president's representative.

C)

prepare the national budget for the president.

D)

supervise the national security agencies, such as the CIA and FBI.

E)

supervise military intelligence agencies.



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