Total War: Sherman’s March to the Sea



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Total War: Sherman’s March to the Sea
In March 1864, President Lincoln named General Grant commander of all the Union armies. Grant then developed a plan to defeat the Confederacy. He would pursue Lee’s army in Virginia, while Union forces under General William T. Sherman pushed through the Deep South to Atlanta and the Atlantic coast.

Battling southward from Tennessee, Sherman took Atlanta in September 1864. He then set out on a march to the sea, cutting a path of destruction up to 60 miles wide and 300 miles long through Georgia.

Sherman waged total war: a war not only against enemy troops, but against everything that supports the enemy. His troops tore up rail lines, destroyed crops, and burned and looted towns.

Sherman’s triumph in Atlanta was important for Lincoln. In 1864, the president was running for reelection, but his prospects were not good. Northerners were tired of war, and Democrats-who had nominated George McClellan-stood a good chance of winning on an antiwar platform.

Sherman’s success changed all that. Suddenly, Northerners could sense victory. Lincoln took 55 percent of the popular vote and won re-election. In his second inaugural speech, Lincoln hoped for a speedy end to the war: “With malice towards none; and charity for all; …let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation’s wounds; …to do all which may achieve and cherish a just, and a lasting peace.”

In December, Sherman took Savannah, Georgia. He then sent a telegram to Lincoln: “I beg to present you, as a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah, with 150 heavy guns and…about 25,000 bales of cotton.”

Total War and Sherman’s March to the Sea brought a swift end to the war.


Total War: Sherman’s March to the Sea


In March 1864, President Lincoln named General Grant commander of all the Union armies. Grant then developed a plan to defeat the Confederacy. He would pursue Lee’s army in Virginia, while Union forces under General William T. Sherman pushed through the Deep South to Atlanta and the Atlantic coast.

Battling southward from Tennessee, Sherman took Atlanta in September 1864. He then set out on a march to the sea, cutting a path of destruction up to 60 miles wide and 300 miles long through Georgia.

Sherman waged total war: a war not only against enemy troops, but against everything that supports the enemy. His troops tore up rail lines, destroyed crops, and burned and looted towns.

Sherman’s triumph in Atlanta was important for Lincoln. In 1864, the president was running for reelection, but his prospects were not good. Northerners were tired of war, and Democrats-who had nominated George McClellan-stood a good chance of winning on an antiwar platform.

Sherman’s success changed all that. Suddenly, Northerners could sense victory. Lincoln took 55 percent of the popular vote and won re-election. In his second inaugural speech, Lincoln hoped for a speedy end to the war: “With malice towards none; and charity for all; …let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation’s wounds; …to do all which may achieve and cherish a just, and a lasting peace.”

In December, Sherman took Savannah, Georgia. He then sent a telegram to Lincoln: “I beg to present you, as a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah, with 150 heavy guns and…about 25,000 bales of cotton.”

Total War and Sherman’s March to the Sea brought a swift end to the war.

Total War: Sherman’s March to the Sea


In March 1864, President Lincoln named General Grant commander of all the Union armies. Grant then developed a plan to defeat the Confederacy. He would pursue Lee’s army in Virginia, while Union forces under General William T. Sherman pushed through the Deep South to Atlanta and the Atlantic coast.

Battling southward from Tennessee, Sherman took Atlanta in September 1864. He then set out on a march to the sea, cutting a path of destruction up to 60 miles wide and 300 miles long through Georgia.

Sherman waged total war: a war not only against enemy troops, but against everything that supports the enemy. His troops tore up rail lines, destroyed crops, and burned and looted towns.

Sherman’s triumph in Atlanta was important for Lincoln. In 1864, the president was running for reelection, but his prospects were not good. Northerners were tired of war, and Democrats-who had nominated George McClellan-stood a good chance of winning on an antiwar platform.

Sherman’s success changed all that. Suddenly, Northerners could sense victory. Lincoln took 55 percent of the popular vote and won re-election. In his second inaugural speech, Lincoln hoped for a speedy end to the war: “With malice towards none; and charity for all; …let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation’s wounds; …to do all which may achieve and cherish a just, and a lasting peace.”

In December, Sherman took Savannah, Georgia. He then sent a telegram to Lincoln: “I beg to present you, as a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah, with 150 heavy guns and…about 25,000 bales of cotton.”

Total War and Sherman’s March to the Sea brought a swift end to the war.


Directions:


  1. Tape the handout into page 70 of your ISN

  2. Draw blue clouds around words of which you are unsure of their meaning. Define them in the margin.

  3. Draw a red box around each paragraphs main idea.

  4. Draw green underlines under each supporting detail

  5. Write 4 questions in your Q column about total war and William T. Sherman

  6. Write a summary on the bottom of page 69 that begins with “Total War was…

  7. Create a reflection on the top of page 69 that shows how you will remember what total war was and how William T. Sherman helped end the Civil War.

Directions:



  1. Tape the handout into page 70 of your ISN

  2. Draw blue clouds around words of which you are unsure of their meaning. Define them in the margin.

  3. Draw a red box around each paragraphs main idea.

  4. Draw green underlines under each supporting detail

  5. Write 4 questions in your Q column about total war and William T. Sherman

  6. Write a summary on the bottom of page 69 that begins with “Total War was…

  7. Create a reflection on the top of page 69 that shows how you will remember what total war was and how William T. Sherman helped end the Civil War.

Directions:



  1. Tape the handout into page 70 of your ISN

  2. Draw blue clouds around words of which you are unsure of their meaning. Define them in the margin.

  3. Draw a red box around each paragraphs main idea.

  4. Draw green underlines under each supporting detail

  5. Write 4 questions in your Q column about total war and William T. Sherman

  6. Write a summary on the bottom of page 69 that begins with “Total War was…

  7. Create a reflection on the top of page 69 that shows how you will remember what total war was and how William T. Sherman helped end the Civil War.



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