TO: Beth Dobkin, Provost from: Keith Ogawa, Chair Academic Senate date



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TO: Beth Dobkin, Provost
FROM: Keith Ogawa, Chair

Academic Senate
DATE: April 3, 2014
RE: Senate Action S-13/14-30CA

New Course Proposal

History 114 – Warfare

In Medieval Europe

At the March 27, 2014 meeting of the Academic Senate, the attached New Course Proposal for Hist 114: Warfare in Medieval Europe was approved on the Consent Agenda.


The item was unanimously approved by the Undergraduate Educational Policies Committee and forwarded to the Senate's Consent Agenda. This action was assigned Senate Action #S-13/14-30CA.

Attachment


Cc: President James Donahue

Vice Provost Richard Carp

Dean Steve Woolpert



NEW COURSE PROPOSAL

1. SOLA, History, 114 (a course number previously used for a course no longer to be taught), Warfare in Medieval Europe

a. The student must have sophomore or standing or AP credit and permission of the professor.

b. The work in the course builds on the lower division introductory study of Western Civilization (History 004).

c. The reading course load includes, among an extensive reading list, the major study of the topic by Philip Contamine as well as significant primary source readings that frame the period under study, Vegetius, On Military Matters, and Christine de Pizan, The Book of Deeds of Arms and of Chivalry.

d. Learning outcomes include the following:


Students will understand the broad developments of medieval warfare in its many aspects including but not limited to the rules of warfare from terrorism to chivalry; the fate of non-combatants in scorched-earth policy and siege warfare; technological and strategic developments; social classes; women and warfare; infantry and cavalry; the moral cost of war; perceptions of the enemy; and the warrior ethos; and pacifism.
Students will learn how to research, analyze, and present questions and topics in medieval warfare history.

 2. Justification for the course

The course is being proposed as an expansion of offerings in early European history, one of the department's major area offerings. It will complement courses already offered in The Dark Ages in Europe (History 111), The Gothic Origins of Europe (History 112), and Europe in the Renaissance (History 113).

In addition, please address the following specifics:



  1. Objectives of the course:

  • Survey of and understanding of historical interpretations and understanding of the major historical, social, military, and technological questions related to medieval warfare in Europe

  • Survey of and understanding of the kinds of primary sources

  • In-depth research into one aspect of the course topic



  1. The course objectives relate to the Department’s desire to train students in historiography by a reading of seminal historians; the School of Liberal Arts commitment to introduce students to great works of the Western Tradition; and the College’s mission to help the student to see that paths of knowledge—in this case, historical, social, military, theological, technological, et al.—are inter-related.

  2. For a fuller review see the appended documents. Kinds of assignments will include the following:

For understanding of the readings, daily history seminar discussion of assigned texts are part of the course. Individual students are charged singularly or in pairs to begin the discussions. Understanding, interpretation, and evaluation of texts are also the major components of the oral midterm and final examination (see the evaluation forms for these). In addition, interpretative and evaluative responses to related campus lectures are assigned. Finally, daily written reading checks of five minutes duration at the beginning of class help student comprehension and establish a regular communication between professor and individual students.

For understanding of the concepts and topics presented in the course, daily discussion and the oral midterm and final examinations help the student in comprehension and formation of their own interpretations and evaluations.

For in-depth research, several bibliography exercises are assigned in preparation of the student’s major work in research and reporting of chosen topic due at the end of the course as a formal essay.

Pass/fail grading option will be allowed.

3. Student Population
The course will draw majors and minors and students fulfilling requirements of other majors and the Core. The maximum number of students enrolled will be 25.
4. Relationship to present College curriculum

The course replaces History 114, Early Modern Europe, a subject now covered by the newest member of our department, Aeleah Soine, our specialist in modern European history. History 114 will now be assigned to this course.

5. Any extraordinary implementation costs

There are no extraordinary implementation costs.

6. Library Resources

A library review has been completed by Sue Birkenseer.

*7. Course credit and grading options
Credit is a full course, with 6 to 9 hours of work outside of class. The format is lecture/discussion.
8. No prerequisites.

9. Course description wording for the appropriate College catalog

A study of the broad developments of medieval warfare in its many aspects including but not limited to the rules of warfare from terrorism to chivalry; the fate of non-combatants in scorched-earth policy and siege warfare; technological and strategic developments; social classes; women and warfare; infantry and cavalry; the moral cost of war; perceptions of the enemy; and the warrior ethos; and pacifism.

10. Course content


These are appended.

11. Review of experimental offering


I offered this course as History 110 in Spring of 2013. It was a great success. The readings except for a British study of castles served very well. I would look for a replacement reading for this topic. Siege warfare was by far the most common kind of medieval warfare and so the history of fortifications is an important part of the study. The readings worked very well. Another component that worked very well was the series of guest speakers – Professor Cortright for the scholastic Just War Theory, Mr. Daniel Baker for pacifism and conscientious objection, and Mr. Russell Harrison for the experience of a soldier on the battlefield. I can also add the students responded very well to the major readings of writings from the time, Vegetius from the era of the fall of the Roman Empire and Christine de Pizan from the era of the Hundred Years War.

 
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