TO: Beth Dobkin, Provost from: Hisham Ahmed, Chair Academic Senate date



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Electronic Resources: Students gain access to online journals and online encyclopedias through our databases. Many of them are in full-text. The following databases offered at the Library have material relating to scholarship and research in the area of history. These databases are sufficient for the research projects in this course.


Historical Abstracts provides access to scholarly literature for history issues


  • Gale Virtual Reference Library and Oxford Reference Online are scholarly general reference access for terms, events, biography

  • Women’s Studies International provides access to scholarly literature relating to women’s studies

  • OmniFile and Academic Search Complete are multidisciplinary databases, offering a great deal of full text in a variety of topics.

  • JSTOR provides an archive of scholarly journals in all subject areas



  1. Additional Resources Needed

    1. Reading list of books not yet in the Library:



Unknown as it depends on the topic and the instructor



    1. Periodicals: Unknown needs



    1. Video/Film: Unknown needs

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2016-04-05 04:44:03
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EXHIVIB. IT 3Opportunities to Develop Information Literacy Skills

This course offers excellent opportunities to develop information literacy skills. It

also offers a way to continue to learn some beginning research skills in preparation for the capstone History course.
As always, I look forward to working with the history faculty in purchasing needs and also in any information literacy assignment help. I believe that the Library is adequately prepared for anyone taking this broad topics course.

Susan Birkenseer

Reference and Instruction Librarian Saint Mary’s College

April, 2016

EXHIBIT 3
H STUDY ABROAD FALL 2013 THROUGH SPRING 2015


: Last Name First Name
Alemu Lidet

No. of Classes
1

Classes
H 110

Country
Ghana

Term
F 2013

Comments

  • Buriani Cam

eron

1

H 2

Semester at Sea







: Floro Cruz Da

vid

1

H 160

Japan







Queen Mary U

i O'Brien Jen

nifer

1

U.S. H 130

London

F 2013




; Sadzhaya Ya

na

1

Mod Eur H 110

-


Rome

Sp 2014




1 Pedraza Karen

2

! Lat Amer H 150

Colombia

F 2013




'

: stirling Mik



aela

1

' H 110

London

; Su 2014




1 Shamie · Charmaine

1

: H 110

Milan or Spain

Sp 2014




! Beguhl Da

niel

1

H 110

  • Berlin

Sp 2014




H 110 Russia and H

I


'I Harriman

Tayler

2

170 Africa

London

Sp 2014




Wilson

Peter




1

H 110

Rome

Sp 2014



Nash

Bianca

1

1 H 170

France

' F 2014

Taking African





1

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EXHIBIT 4


HIST 120: PROBLEMS AND ISSUES IN EUROPEAN HISTORY


German History: From Reformation to Unification, 1500-1871
FALL 2011—COURSE SYLLABUS


PROFESSOR: Aeleah Soine EMAIL: TBD
MEETING TIME: MWF 10:20-11:20 AM OFFICE: TBD
OFFICE HOURS: TBD, and by appointment.


COURSE DESCRIPTION
If national histories serve to reinforce common identities and traditions within the context of the modern nation-state, then what are we to make of German history before the formal unification of “Germany” in 1871? Beginning with the Holy Roman Empire at the time of the Lutheran Reformation in the sixteenth century and concluding with the creation of the Kaiserreich (Imperial Germany) in the nineteenth century, this course seeks to understand how aspects of tradition within the predominantly German-speaking regions of central Europe were weighed and mobilized in order to answer the key questions of who are the Germans and what is or where is Germany? To this end, our course materials will draw upon a diverse and interdisciplinary array of primary and secondary readings on such topics as the Reformation, changing family and gender roles, the Enlightenment and Romanticism, wars and diplomacy, industrialization and the rise of socialism, revolutions, and the making of what have become trademark German literary and cultural traditions (poetry, fairytales, music, coffee, and beer drinking).

COURSE OBJECTIVES


  • Historicize the origins and development of popular German national myths and traditions

  • Examine identity formation (German or otherwise) through the lens of gender, class, race, ethnicity, and religion

  • Understand the “making of Germany” as a negotiation of tensions among regional, national, and international identities

  • Interpret primary documents, historical artifacts, and scholarly analyses

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REQUIRED BOOKS




  • Steven Ozment, Flesh and Spirit: Private Life in Early Modern Germany (Penguin, 2001). ISBN: 978-0140291988

  • Peter A. Morton (Editor), Barbara Dahms (Translator), The Trial of Tempel Anneke: Records of a Witchcraft Trial in Brunswick, Germany, 1663 (Toronto, 2006). ISBN: 978-155111706

  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther (Penguin, orig. 1774). ISBN: 978- 0140445039

  • John Breuilly, Austria, Prussia, and the Making of Germany, 1806-1871, 2nd Edition (Longman, 2011, orig. 2002). ISBN: 978-1408272763


COURSE EXPECTATIONS
Read for understanding. Think critically and take notes. Be engaged and respectful. Dare to be creative. Write with commitment and integrity.

  • For extra support or guidance with writing assignments, you should visit the Max Center (http://www.macalester.edu/max/) in Kagin Hall for professional or peer assistance with your writing process.

  • Assignments are expected to meet all specified guidelines upon submission. Failure to meet length requirements or use of formatting techniques to lengthen or shorten papers, inappropriate use of quotations, and/or not addressing all objectives of a question will result in significant grading penalties. In addition, sources should remain in keeping with the assignment specifications. Websites such as Wikipedia, online study guides, personal webpages, and commercial sites advertising products are almost never appropriate! When in doubt, ask.

  • Class attendance is more than just showing up. Newspapers, iPods, cell phones, and any other outside media must be turned off and put away during class time. In addition, please listen attentively to whoever is speaking and attempt to recognize the merit in what they say even if you do not necessarily agree with him/her. Snacks and beverages are okay unless they become a source of distraction.

  • All written and oral assignments are expected to be the sole product of the person(s) whose name is attached. Attempting to pass off someone else’s work as one’s own, in any form, is unacceptable! Improper consultation or borrowing from websites, books, peers, etc. will receive a zero for the assignment and will be reported to the Director of Academic Programs. Subsequent offenses will result in the failure of this course. For more information on what constitutes plagiarism or academic dishonesty, see (http://www.macalester.edu/employmentservices/handbook/sec12.10.html).

  • History classes often touch on sensitive issues of religion, politics, race, gender, and nationality. It is expected that all students will be open to and respectful of other students’ views. Discussions should be kept relevant to the course material and issues at hand; they should NOT include personally directed comments or attacks, use of negative stereotypes, or broad generalizations about groups of people. Inappropriate use or display of language, including but not limited to cursing, name-calling, racial/ethnic/sexual/ religious comments, visual images, and offensive use of slang will not be tolerated! Students who disrupt the safe space of the classroom will receive a one-on-one warning, followed by loss of participation points, and dismissal from class for repeat incidents. In addition, please see me privately if you are feeling uncomfortable for any reason in class.

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Directory: sites -> default -> files -> attachments -> files
files -> Smc core Curriculum Course Proposal Fall 2013
files -> Español 140: Survey of Latin American Literature
files -> Application for Engaging the World, American Diversity Course Designation
files -> Application for Pathways to Knowledge, Social, Cultural and historical Understanding Designation
files -> History 110 Warfare in the Middle Ages Brother Charles
files -> Psychology 008 African American Psychology Spring Semester 2012 Instructor: Morenike Oshi-Ojuri, Psyd office: Phone
files -> Hist 163: Ethnic Identity and Conflict in China
files -> Smc core Curriculum Course Proposal Form
files -> History 132 The American Revolution and the Early Republic
files -> Core Curriculum Designation Proposal Theological Understanding: Theological Explorations


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