To be used in approved schools with Year 11 students only in 2005. Modern History Senior Syllabus



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8.2 Special consideration


Guidance about the nature and appropriateness of special consideration and special arrangements for particular students may be found in the policy statement on special consideration entitled Special Consideration: Exemption and Special Arrangements: Senior Secondary Assessment (30 May 1994). This statement also provides guidance on responsibilities, principles and strategies that schools may need to consider in their school settings.

To enable special consideration to be effective for students so identified, it is important that schools plan and implement strategies in the early stages of an assessment program and not at the point of deciding levels of achievement. The special consideration might involve alternative teaching approaches, assessment plans and learning experiences.


8.3 Exit criteria


The following three criteria must be used when making judgments on student achievement for exit levels of achievement.

Criterion 1: Planning and using an historical research process


Criterion 1 is about planning and putting into effect the procedural and organisational structures of a research task. It involves students in:

identifying the issue for investigation

devising, developing and focusing the key research question or hypothesis, and sub-questions

locating and using primary and secondary sources

maintaining a record of research

reflecting on and changing direction or emphasis of research when necessary.


Criterion 2: Forming historical knowledge through critical inquiry


Criterion 2 is about the development of historical knowledge and cognitive skills through critical engagement with historical sources. It involves students in:

identifying the information that is explicit in sources

understanding the nature of historical sources of evidence, assumptions about the problematic character of historical sources, and the tentative and interpretive qualities of historical knowledge

analysing what is explicit and implicit in sources, including themes, values and interrelationships within and among sources

evaluating the worth of sources: assessing the reliability, authenticity, representativeness, relevance and accuracy of the sources and locating value positions, biases, perspectives and standpoints in their historical context

making decisions about a question or hypothesis: synthesising evidence, reaching a conclusion about a question or hypothesis, and justifying the conclusion.


Criterion 3: Communicating historical knowledge


This criterion is about presenting the results of historical research. It involves students in:

communicating a knowledge and understanding of

historical information

concepts


change and continuity

cause and effect

events

developments



producing written and non-written responses in appropriate genres

producing logically developed and fluent historical arguments, with claims substantiated by sources of evidence or references to evidence

meeting the requirements for language conventions, referencing, length, scale and scope of responses.

8.4 Exit criteria and the key competencies


Direct assessment of and reporting on student levels of achievement in the key competencies is not a requirement of this syllabus. However there are clear links between elements of the key competencies, and the exit criteria and standards, especially:

Criterion 1 and key competencies 1 (collecting, analysing and organising information) and 3 (planning and organising activities)

Criterion 2 and key competencies 1 (collecting, analysing and organising information) and 6 (solving problems)

Criterion 3 and key competency 2 (communicating ideas and information).


8.5 Categories of assessment techniques


Summative assessment in Modern History will incorporate selections from all of the following four categories of assessment techniques. Each category is described in terms of its characteristics, and the conditions of implementation that apply to it at strategic intervals throughout the two-year course.

Category 1: Extended written response to historical evidence

Characteristics

By monitoring

By verification

1. Format

Essay under test conditions in which the student gives a response to a question or statement, mainly by reference to sources supplied. The question or statement is not provided before the test (unseen).

If the sources are unseen, they should be sufficient to allow students to engage with in a reasonable preparation time, e.g. about four in Year 11, and about six in Year 12.

Recommended time limit: 1½–2hours.



Conditions:

all sources provided prior to the test; students may have assistance from teacher with comprehension, interpretation of sources



OR

some sources provided prior to the test, and some unseen; students may have assistance from teacher with comprehension and interpretation of sources



OR

all sources unseen.

All conditions must be clearly stated on the assessment instrument.

Clean copies of sources to be provided for test.

No notes allowed for test.


Conditions:

some sources provided prior to the test, and some unseen; no teacher assistance



OR

all sources unseen.

All conditions must be clearly stated on the assessment instrument.

Clean copies of sources to be provided for test.



2. Criteria

All are possible, C2 and C3 most likely.

All are possible, C2 and C3 most likely.

3. Length

500–600 words

600–800 words

4. Types of sources

all primary, or

primary and secondary


Varied, including at least one “visual” ( e.g. graph, cartoon, photograph, map, illustration)

Varied, including at least two “visuals” (e.g. graph, cartoon, photograph, map, illustration)

5. Relevance of sources

All relevant

May vary

6. Reliability and representativeness of sources

May vary

May vary

7. Extent that sources support statement

Clearly for or against

Contestable — evaluation and application of perspectives must be applied to make judgments.

Category 2: Written research tasks

Characteristics

By monitoring

By verification

1. Format:

Written assignment, produced as a result of the development of a valid research question and the use of a range of historical sources. Conditions include some class time and some student time

Other written responses based on research, presented in a variety of genres.


Conditions for each format:

reflective report on research experience; the report includes contents page, introduction, outline of research strategy, findings to date, tentative conclusions, solved and unsolved problems, strategy for completing research, bibliography or list of references, and research notes

written assignment, in which a hypothesis is tested or research question answered, and conclusions drawn; will include statement and development of hypothesis (if used), full referencing, research notes

a form of presentation in which results of research are presented in a genre such as an analytical, persuasive or argumentative essay, a formal report, a piece of historical recreation or fiction, a journal, a feature article, a dialogue, or an interview with contextualising essay; presentations to be supported by referencing appropriate to the genre, and research notes.



Conditions for each format:

written assignment: analytical essay, in which a hypothesis is tested or research question answered, and conclusions drawn; will include statement and development of hypothesis (if used), full referencing, research notes

a form of presentation in which results of research are presented in a genre such as an analytical, persuasive or argumentative essay, a formal report, a piece of historical recreation or fiction, or an interview with contextualising essay; presentations to be supported by referencing appropriate to the genre, and research notes.


2. Criteria

All

All

3. Length

Reflective report on research experience: up to 600 words

Assignment: 800–1000 words — around 1500 where depth of topic warrants

Other tasks: up to 1000 words


Assignment: 1000–1500 words generally — around 2000 where depth of topic warrants

Other tasks: up to 1500 words



4. Authentication of research process

Selected evidence that may consist of annotated preparation notes in response to issues that emerged during research, teacher observation sheets, research checklists, and/or self/peer assessment

Selected evidence that may consist of annotated preparation notes in response to issues that emerged during research, teacher observation sheets, research checklists, and/or self/peer assessment

5. Teacher involvement

Consultation and feedback on research process should be provided judiciously, gradually diminishing with student experience and confidence.

Consultation and feedback on research process should be provided judiciously, gradually diminishing with student experience and confidence. See 8.5.1.

6. Origin of research question

Provided by the teachers and/or negotiated

Negotiated; rationale that acknowledges origins of question expected

Category 3: Multi-modal presentations

Characteristics

By monitoring

By verification

1. Format. Multi-modal presentations are the outcome of research and may take a wide variety of forms. All multi-modal presentations should be accompanied by a detailed criteria sheet that makes explicit the presentation skills demonstrated. All presentations must be accompanied by research notes. Presentations should conform to the characteristics of the mode and medium selected.

Possible formats:

a dramatic presentation followed by an out-of-role account and rationale for the script with accompanying key items of evidence

a presentation involving any of the visual and performing arts, e.g. sculpture, dance, artwork, music, with rationale and key items of evidence

a video presentation that is interpretive and interactive.

a computer simulation that is interpretive and interactive

non-written assignment: seminar, debate or formal speech; presentations will vary but must include referencing appropriate to the genre, and research notes

any combination, or other as described in section 3, Communicating historical knowledge.


Possible formats:

a dramatic presentation followed by an out-of-role account and rationale for the script with accompanying key items of evidence

a presentation involving any of the visual and performing arts, e.g. sculpture, dance, artwork, music with rationale and key items of evidence

a video presentation that is interpretive and interactive

a computer simulation or website that is interpretative and interactive

non-written assignment: seminar, debate or formal speech; presentations will vary but must include referencing appropriate to the genre, and research notes

any combination, or other as described in section 3, Communicating historical knowledge.


2. Criteria

All are possible.

All are possible.

3. Authentication of research processes

Selected evidence that may consist of annotated preparation notes in response to issues that emerged during research, teacher observation sheets, research checklists, and/or self/peer assessment

Selected evidence that may consist of annotated preparation notes in response to issues that emerged during research, teacher observation sheets, research checklists, and/or self/peer assessment

4. Teacher involvement

Consultation and feedback on research process should be provided judiciously, gradually diminishing with student experience and confidence.

Consultation and feedback on research process should be provided judiciously, gradually diminishing with student experience and confidence. See 8.5.1.

5. Origins of presentation concept

Provided by the teachers and/or negotiated

Negotiated; rationale that acknowledges origins of question expected

Category 4: Additional test formats

Characteristics

By monitoring

By verification

1. Formats:

objective tests

short response tests, e.g. items requiring 1–2 line responses or short paragraph responses

response to stimulus test

essay test

other written responses under test conditions such as editorials, news articles.



Conditions for each format:

supervised objective tests

supervised short-response tests

supervised response to stimulus tests:

all sources used provided prior to the test; students may have assistance from teacher with comprehension, interpretation of sources

OR

some sources provided prior to test, and some unseen; students may have assistance from teacher with comprehension, interpretation of sources



OR

all sources unseen.

essay testing an unseen question derived from student research; no notes or additional material permitted during test

an extended written response to an unseen question or task (analytical, persuasive or argumentative); no teacher assistance; no notes or additional material permitted during test.

All conditions must be clearly stated on the assessment instrument.

Clean copies of sources to be provided for test.



Conditions for each format:

supervised objective tests

supervised short-response tests

supervised response to stimulus tests, in which questions are unseen:

some sources provided prior to the test and some unseen; no teacher assistance

OR

all sources unseen.

essay testing an unseen question derived from student research; no notes or additional material permitted during test

an extended written response to an unseen question or task (analytical, persuasive or argumentative); no teacher assistance; no notes or additional material permitted during test.

All conditions must be clearly stated on the assessment instrument.

Clean copies of sources to be provided for test.



2. Criteria

All three are possible. There should be sufficient evidence within a task to support a result in a criterion.

All three are possible, C2 and C3 most likely. There should be sufficient evidence within a task to support a result in a criterion.

3. Length

Variable, according to nature of task; essays 500–600 words, other written responses about 400 words

Variable, according to nature of task; essays 600–800 words, other written responses about 500 words

8.5.1 Authentication of student tasks

Draft of responses for prepared tasks


The processes described in the objectives and criteria of the Modern History syllabus are developmental. Students should have ample opportunity to consult with and receive feedback about prepared tasks, particularly in Year 11, so that they may develop their understanding of and capacity to use historical processes of inquiry. However, to ensure the increasing independence of learning, it is strongly recommended that the number of drafts of assignments and other prepared tasks that are commented on by teachers decreases substantially between semester 1 in Year 11 and semester 4 in Year 12. By Year 12, effective feedback might concentrate on known difficulties and shortcomings that individual students experience, or teachers might respond to the drafting of a short section of the task. Another approach might entail whole class or small group teaching to highlight and assist with specific difficulties demonstrated in student drafts.

The following guidelines are recommended to ascertain that a prepared response is genuinely that of the student.

The teacher should monitor the development of the task by seeing plans and a draft of the student’s work.

The student will produce and maintain appropriate documentation of the development of the response, and include these when submitting the task for assessment.

The student must acknowledge all resources used.

The teacher may ask students to demonstrate their understanding of the task during preparation or at the time the response is submitted.


Authentication of references


Text, journal, audio-visual sources: Students must acknowledge all sources in an accepted conventional format, including in-text references and bibliographies.

Electronic sources: students must acknowledge any sources downloaded or copied from software and websites. The following citation system is recommended:

author’s name (if known) or publisher’s name

publishing date

type of source (e.g. website, CD-ROM) in brackets

name of article (if any)

main website address

date of last page update, with updated written before the date

publisher, city of publication (and country if city alone may cause confusion).

The following example illustrates the method:

Queensland Studies Authority 2004 (website), ‘Senior Certificate’, http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au (updated 1 April 2004), QSA Brisbane.





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