Title: Mighty Jackie The Strike Out Queen



Download 53.44 Kb.
Date27.05.2016
Size53.44 Kb.
#70403

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Storytown - 2009 Grade 3


Unit 1/Week 2

Title: Mighty Jackie The Strike Out Queen

Suggested Time: 5 days (45 minutes per day)

Common Core ELA Standards: RL.4.1, RL.4.3, RL.4.4, RL.4.7, RL.4.9; W.4.2, W.4.4, W.4.9; SL.4.2, SL.4.6; L.4.1, L.4.2, L.4.4, L.4.5
Teacher Instructions

Refer to the Introduction for further details.

Before Teaching

  1. Read the Big Ideas and Key Understandings and the Synopsis. Please do not read this to the students. This is a description for teachers, about the big ideas and key understanding that students should take away after completing this task.

Big Ideas and Key Understandings

In the face of opposition, a person must be determined to accomplish what they believe to be their true path in life.



Synopsis

For as long as she could remember, Jackie Mitchell’s father told Jackie she could be good at whatever she wanted, as long as she worked hard at it. Jackie worked at baseball and before long she could outplay anyone in her neighborhood even the boys. On April 2, 1931, the famous New York Yankees stopped in Tennessee for an exhibition game against the unknown Chattanooga Lookout baseball team. Jackie Mitchell, a seventeen-year-old girl, made baseball history by striking out both Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig.


  1. Read entire main selection text, keeping in mind the Big Ideas and Key Understandings.

  2. Re-read the main selection text while noting the stopping points for the Text Dependent Questions and teaching Vocabulary.

During Teaching

  1. Students read the entire main selection text independently.

  2. Teacher reads the main selection text aloud with students following along.

(Depending on how complex the text is and the amount of support needed by students, the teacher may choose to reverse the order of steps 1 and 2.)

  1. Students and teacher re-read the text while stopping to respond to and discuss the questions and returning to the text. A variety of methods can be used to structure the reading and discussion (i.e.: whole class discussion, think-pair-share, independent written response, group work, etc.)

Text Dependent Questions

Text Dependent Questions

Answers







The title of this selection is Mighty Jackie The Strike-Out Queen. Explain which words from the title indicate

Jackie is a talented baseball pitcher.


The word mighty means strong and forceful. Strike-Out Queen indicates she is royally set above the rest in striking players out.

Reread page 60. What phrase did the author use to describe the New York Yankees and what phrase did she use to describe the Chattanooga Lookouts? Explain in your own word what each phrase means.

New York Yankees---“a legendary team” means a famous team with famous players

Chattanooga Lookouts---“a nothing team” means unknown team with unknown players



What made people “sit up and took notice” of a “nothing team” like the Chattanooga Outlooks? (pg. 60)

The reason people took notice was because the pitcher of the Lookouts was a girl and girls didn’t play baseball.

Good authors choose specific words to convey to the reader certain feelings or emotions. In the first sentence of the fifth paragraph on page 60, the author chose to use the word sneered. To sneer means to make fun of or ridicule someone. Reread the sentence and replace the word sneered with the word wrote. Explain why using sneered instead of wrote is a better choice.

Sneered suggests a negative emotion or feelings. The word wrote is a neutral term. No emotions or feelings attached.

What did the reporter mean when he wrote that Jackie would swing “a mean lipstick” instead of a bat? (Pg. 60)

He was making fun of Jackie because she was a girl. Lipstick is something girls use and, at that time, bats were something only boys used.

Authors sometimes interrupt the regular time order of events in a story to take the reader back in time to show how the past event affected the current situation. This is called “flashback.” Reread pages 62-63. How did the author take the reader back in time on pages 62-63? How does the illustration on page 62 help you to know the author went back in time?

The author took the reader from the present time back to when Jackie was a child playing ball. The illustration shows Jackie as a child.

Reread page 63. How did Jackie’s dad and Dazzy Vance affect Jackie’s desire to keep playing baseball?

Her dad told her that she could be good at anything she wanted as long as she worked hard at it. Dazzy Vance, a star pitcher from the Brooklyn Dodgers, taught Jackie how to pitch when she was 8 years old. Jackie thought if a real pitcher believed she could pitch it must be true.

The author writes that Jackie worked hard at baseball. Working hard at something takes determination when it is difficult to do. What evidence does the author provide to show Jackie’s determination to become a pitcher even though she is a girl? (Pg. 63)



She practiced pitching till it was too cold and dark to stay outside. She threw balls until her shoulder ached and her fingers were callused. She pitched until her eyes blurred over and she couldn’t see where she was throwing.

What does the author mean when she says that even though Jackie could not see where she was throwing the ball “her arm knew”?

Jackie practiced so much she did not have to see where she was throwing the ball she could feel where the ball was going. It became instinctive and second nature to her. It was not something she had to think about any longer.

How does the author let you know the story shifts back from her childhood to the present time of the story? (Pg. 64)

The text begins with, “And now she was finally going to………” Also the illustration depicts Jackie as a young woman on the pitcher’s mound.

How did the “Home Run King” feel about women playing baseball? (Pg. 64)

He didn’t like the idea of a woman pitcher at all. Women were too delicate. Babe thought women would never do well in baseball because it would kill them to play ball every day.

Reread page 65. How was Babe Ruth feeling when he walked up to the plate to bat? How does the author let you know? Cite evidence from the text.

He tipped his hat at Jackie. He wasn’t going easy on her. He was sure he would hit the ball out of the ballpark.

Sometimes authors use words that imitate the sound the word describes. Example: The word buzz imitates the sounds of bees. The word sizzle imitates the sound of bacon frying. When a word imitates the sound it is describing, this is called onomatopoeia. Give an example of onomatopoeia from page 66. Explain why this is an example.

The word thwunk is onomatopoeia because it sounds like the ball hitting the leather of the catcher’s mitt.

Gaped means to stare at something or someone with wide eyes and your mouth open in surprise. What made Babe Ruth gape in surprise? (Pg. 66)

Babe Ruth received “strike one” because Jackie threw the ball where he was not expecting it. He was shocked that he didn’t hit the ball. He was expecting to slam the ball out of the park.

The phrase hooting and jeering means to boo and yell insults at someone. In paragraph 8 on page 66, the author wrote, “Now the crowd was hooting and jeering.” Who was the crowd hooting and jeering? Explain your answer citing evidence from the text.

The crowd was hooting and jeering Jackie because she threw two balls after the first strike. Babe and the crowd were snickering because they thought the first strike was probably just a mistake. Note: Refer back to page paragraph 2 page 64.

On page 66-67, notice the way “Strrrrike One!” and “Strrrrike Two!” are in bold print. It is capitalized and has an exclamation mark following the phrase. The letter r in strike is repeated several times. The author did this to show how the umpire exaggerated the r sound and spoke loudly when he said the word. Turn to your shoulder partner and take turns saying the phrases “Strrrike One!” and “Strrrike Two!” as the umpire might have said them.




Reread page 67. Compare the way Babe Ruth is feeling to the way Jackie is feeling after pitching her second strike to the Babe


Babe Ruth is angry because he is being struck out by a girl! Jackie is neither angry nor afraid. She is feeling confident about her pitching ability.

Reread page 68. Using context clues define the word fluke. What is the author referring to when he uses the word fluke?



A fluke is a mistake. It was a fluke or mistake Jackie struck out the famous Babe Ruth.

How did Jackie prove to everyone that striking out Babe Ruth was not a fluke? Page 69

Next, Jackie repeated what she did with the Babe by striking out the famous Lou Gehrig.

How does the author show that the crowd’s feelings for Jackie changed by the end of the ball game? (Pg. 70)

Instead of hooting and jeering the crowd was clapping and cheering like crazy.



Vocabulary




KEY WORDS ESSENTIAL TO UNDERSTANDING

BIG IDEAS OF TEXT

Words addressed with a question or task



WORDS WORTH KNOWING

Words to be part of systematic vocabulary instruction, not essential for understanding the big ideas of the text



TEACHER PROVIDES DEFINITION

not enough contextual clues provided in the text



Sneer, pg. 60

Determined, gape, hoot, jeer, pg. 66




Exhibition, legendary, pg. 60

Sandlot, callus pg. 63

Bleachers, mound, mutter, delicate, pg. 64

Flinch, snicker, heft, pg. 66

Glare, stun, pg. 68



STUDENTS FIGURE OUT THE MEANING

sufficient context clues are provided in the text




Fluke, pg. 68

Insult, pg. 61

Ache, pg. 63





Culminating Task

  • Use evidence from the text and class discussion to write a paragraph describing the obstacles Jackie overcame and how she made baseball history. Include at least 3 specific details from the text in your explanation.

Answer:

For as long as she could remember, Jackie Mitchell dreamed of becoming a professional baseball player. During this time in history, baseball was a man’s game. Women were told that playing baseball was unladylike. Jackie was constantly reminded by all the kids at school and all the boys in her neighborhood that girls were not supposed to play baseball. No matter what, Jackie continued to play. She finally got an opportunity to pitch in an exhibition game against the New York Yankees. Before the game the newspapers wrote mean things about Jackie. One article stated, she would swing a “mean lipstick” instead of a bat.” Jackie continued to play. Even with the booing and jeering from the crowd during the game, Jackie continued to play. Because she was determined to follow her dream, she made baseball history by striking out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig.


Additional Tasks

  • Have students work in pairs to analyze the way Babe Ruth is characterized in the selection. Complete the chart below. Go back to the story for the information needed to complete the chart.

Babe Ruth

His Actions

His Words

His Traits

  • snickered when Jackie flinched and pitched a ball

  • got ready to slam the ball out of the park

  • got mad when Jackie threw two strikes

  • threw the bat down in disgust

  • Women are “too delicate” for baseball

  • “They’ll never make good.”

  • “It would kill them to play ball every day.”

  • Told reports it was the last time he’d bat against a woman.

  • acts like a bully

  • bad sport

  • short tempered

  • doesn’t want to look bad



  • On page 60, the author tells us that the New York Daily News (point out reason for italics) wrote about Jackie Mitchell. How did the author let the reader know the exact words that were written in the newspaper in 1931? Write the exact words.

Answer: She placed quotation marks around the words because they were the exact words or quotes from newspaper. a mean lipstick” and “a trained seal behind the plate”

  • Why did the author think it was important to go back in time to describe events from Jackie’s childhood?

Answer: The author wanted to inform the reader that Jackie always loved baseball and wanted to play even when she was told girls were not supposed to play baseball. Also the author wanted to show Jackie’s childhood determination to play, her determination to practice, and the inspiration she received from her father and Dazzy.

  • One way authors capture the interest of readers is to make a story suspenseful. Suspense is what you feel when you are excited and uncertain about how events may turn out. Reread page 64 silently, noticing how the author is building the suspense on this page. Now, practice with a partner taking turns orally reading page 64 expressing the suspense with your voice. Remember to read smoothly and accurately with appropriate phrasing, pausing, and expression. Discuss with your partner how the author builds the suspense.



  • Good readers use visualization to form mental pictures in their mind to help them better understand what the characters are feeling. With a partner: Partner 1 closes his/her eyes while partner two reads the last paragraph on page 66 orally. Then swap roles. Visualize what Jackie is feeling and doing while your partner is reading. Discuss with your partner what Jackie is doing and be ready to share your explanation.

Answer: Jackie is trying to get her concentration back after throwing two balls to Babe Ruth and hearing the hooting and jeering from the crowd. She is mentally preparing herself to get back on track. She is “pumping herself up.”

Name __________________________________________ Date ___________________


Mighty Jackie: Strike-Out Queen”


  1. The title of this selection is “Mighty Jackie: Strike-Out Queen.” Which words from the title indicate Jackie is a talented baseball pitcher?



  1. Reread page 60. What phrase did the author use to describe the New York Yankees and what phrase did she use to describe the Chattanooga Lookouts? Explain in your own word what each phrase means.



  1. What made people “sit up and took notice” of a “nothing team” like the Chattanooga Outlooks? (Pg. 60)



  1. Good authors choose specific words to convey to the reader certain feelings or emotions. In the first sentence of the fifth paragraph on page 60, the author chose to use the word sneered. To sneer means to make fun of or ridicule someone. Reread the sentence and replace the word sneered with the word wrote. Explain why using sneered instead of wrote is a better choice.

  2. What did the reporter mean when he wrote that Jackie would swing “a mean lipstick” instead of a bat? (Pg. 60)



  1. Authors sometimes interrupt the regular time order of events in a story to take the reader back in time to show how the past event affected the current situation. This is called “flashback.” Reread pages 62-63. How did the author take the reader back in time on pages 62-63? How does the illustration on page 62 help you to know the author went back in time?



  1. Reread page 63. How did Jackie’s dad and Dazzy Vance affect Jackie’s desire to keep playing baseball?



  1. The author writes that Jackie worked hard at baseball. Working hard at something takes determination when it is difficult to do. What evidence does the author provide to show Jackie’s determination to become a pitcher even though she is a girl? (Pg. 63)



  1. What does the author mean when she says that even though Jackie could not see where she was throwing the ball “her arm knew”?



  1. How does the author let you know the story shifts back from her childhood to the present time of the story? (Pg. 64)



  1. How did the “Home Run King” feel about women playing baseball? (Pg. 64)



  1. Reread page 65. How was Babe Ruth feeling when he walked up to the plate to bat? How does the author let you know? Cite evidence from the text.



  1. Sometimes authors use words that imitate the sound the word describes. Example: The word buzz imitates the sounds of bees. The word sizzle imitates the sound of bacon frying. When a word imitates the sound it is describing, this is called onomatopoeia. Give an example of onomatopoeia from page 66. Explain why this is an example.




  1. Gaped means to stare at something or someone with wide eyes and your mouth open in surprise. What made Babe Ruth gape in surprise? (Pg. 66)



  1. The phrase hooting and jeering means to boo and yell insults at someone. In paragraph 8 on page 66, the author wrote, “Now the crowd was hooting and jeering.” Who was the crowd hooting and jeering? Explain your answer citing evidence from the text.



  1. On page 66-67, notice the way “Strrrrike One!” and “Strrrrike Two!” are in bold print. It is capitalized and has an exclamation mark following the phrase. The letter r in strike is repeated several times. The author did this to show how the umpire exaggerated the r sound and spoke loudly when he said the word. Turn to your shoulder partner and take turns saying the phrases “Strrrike One!” and “Strrrike Two!” as the umpire might have said them.



  1. Reread page 67. Compare the way Babe Ruth is feeling to the way Jackie is feeling after pitching her second strike to the Babe.



  1. Reread page 68. Using context clues define the word fluke. What is the author referring to when he uses the word fluke?



  1. How did Jackie prove to everyone that striking out Babe Ruth was not a fluke? (Pg. 69)



  1. How does the author show that the crowd’s feelings for Jackie changed by the end of the ball game? (Pg. 70)



Download 53.44 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2023
send message

    Main page