This document contains all text in the 5 Communication and Research Skills (cars) modules



Download 0.55 Mb.
Page8/31
Date28.01.2021
Size0.55 Mb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   31
Search Tools

A. OneSearch

B. Databases (Find these in the subject guides)

C. Google Scholar

D. Web Searching

Information Resources


  • I need to do in-depth searching in my subject area.

  • I’m just getting started. I need to find books, articles, databases and more at UWA

  • I need to explore the broadest range of scholarly resources

  • I’m looking for reports from government, NGO or corporate websites

Answers:

  • I need to do in-depth searching in my subject area. B Databases

  • I’m just getting started. I need to find books, articles, databases and more at UWA. A OneSearch

  • I need to explore the broadest range of scholarly resources. C Google Scholar

  • I’m looking for reports from government, NGO or corporate websites D Web searching

Slide Thirteen

Find The Best Evidence

Finding Scholarly Information

When you write at uni, you need to search for evidence that will support your argument.

For essay writing, what does it mean to ‘use evidence’? Which two answers are correct?


  1. Using examples and research findings to support and validate your ideas.

  2. Demonstrating that you have investigated and synthesized information from many sources.

  3. Conducted original experiments by yourself.

The correct answer is A and B. You need to be able to find and discuss evidence from a range of other sources to show you have considered different perspectives on your topic.

Slide Fourteen

Find The Best Evidence

Questions to guide your reading:

When reading, ask yourself: Can this article or book be used to…


  • WHO (OR WHICH)

  • WHAT

  • WHY

  • WHERE

  • WHEN

  • HOW

  • Support a wider scientific definition of climate change?

  • Demonstrate bias in mass media portrayals?

  • Provide an example of Australian mass media reactions?

Slide fifteen

Find The Best Evidence

Effective reading. Click on the following headings for some effective reading techniques.



  1. Identify your purpose: As you read, keep in mind your information need and what questions you need to answer to address your assignment task.

  2. Skim: Skimming is an important skill to help you quickly decide if a resource will meet your information need. Focus on article summaries, headings, diagrams and opening and closing paragraph sentences.

  3. Read in Depth: When you identify a relevant article, you will want to spend more time considering the author’s arguments. Use techniques such as annotating the text, visually representing the main concepts or questioning how the information relates to your information need.

  4. Reflect: By reflecting, you relate what you have read to the assignment task. This will help you apply these new ideas to support your own argument.

Slide sixteen Find The Best Evidence

Critically Evaluating Information.

You should evaluate information for its:


  • Currency – is the information up to date?

  • Authority – Has the information come from a reliable source?

  • Relevance – Is the information relevant and answer your question

  • Accuracy – Is the information well researched and supported by evidence?

Slide seventeen

Find The Best Evidence

Decide what sources you need.

Do you need to find scholarly sources? Let’s practice identifying them! Which of these is a scholarly journal?


  1. The Economist is a scholarly journal:.

  2. The Journal of Agricultural Science is a scholarly journal:

Answer: B The Journal of Agricultural Science

Slide Eighteen

Find The Best Evidence

Critically Evaluating Information.

Click here to show Example Question: In the Australian mass media, climate change is often described as being the rise in global temperatures. However, some would argue that climate change is not just about global warming. Discuss, citing examples from the last ten years.

Take a look at this article:

Wikipedia. (2015). Media coverage of climate change. Wikipedia. Retrieved 18th June 2105, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_Coverage_Of_Climate_Change

Should you use this information in an academic essay?

Click ‘Next’ to answer on the next page

Slide Nineteen

Find The Best Evidence

Critically Evaluating Information.

Should you use this information in an academic essay?

Do you agree with these statements?

Q1: The information in this article is current? Yes No

Answer: Yes. The dates of the reference cited, and how recently the information was published indicate currency. This webpage was updated recently. Look for a “recently updated” or “last modified” date, usually at the bottom of the page.

Q2: The information is relevant to the assignment? Yes No

Answer: No. You must consider multiple factors when deciding relevance – Is the information appropriate in an academic setting, is it secondary, primary or tertiary, and is it relevant to my topic? It is okay to use tertiary information when starting out though, because it helps develop your understanding.

Q3: The information has potential biases? Yes No

Answer: Yes. A balanced discussion that considers multiple views is an indicator that an article has minimal bias. However, as we do not know who the author is we can not be sure that it is free from bias. You would have to explore it further and compare it to other sources before being sure.

Q4: The article has lots of references so it must be valid? Yes No

Answer: No. While the information appears to be supported by evidence and well-founded, you will have to look closer at the references for reliability and bias before deciding if the information is valid. The number of references is not an indicator of validity.



Slide twenty

Find The Best Evidence




Share with your friends:
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   31




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page