This document contains all text in the 5 Communication and Research Skills (cars) modules



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Textbooks and Resources

Slide Four

Where should you search? OneSearch!

OneSearch is the library’s search tool for finding print and online materials.

Watch this video for tips on using Onesearch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=0CXnQcvJssg



Video transcript

Okay—here it is. Now we want to navigate to this OneSearch 'header'. Click on that.

Now, in order to access the full functionality of OneSearch we need to log in, and for that we will use our Pheme password.

Let us do that now.

Now, the first thing we are going to do is try a basic search. Let us try something like "climate change" AND "mass media". You will see that I am using 'AND' to combine the two phrases--"climate change" AND "mass media". You can use 'OR" instead of 'AND' and it will give a wider search result.

So, you can see here we have 798 results for our query--and you can see most of the results here are articles. Let us just say that we want see what books are available in the library on the subject. We would go over to theses 'limiters' or 'facets' on the side of the page and select 'available in the library'.

So, we have four books here that appear to relate to our search topic. You will notice there is a tab saying 'check availability', so you can click on that and we can see the location and call number of that book. This one is in the Reid Library. There is the call number and it is in the main collection on the third floor--and we can see that book is available.

We can see at any point we can remove any filter we have applied by clicking the link above the list--just like this.

So you can see by clicking that we have come back to our original search results of 798. Let us try this 'peer-reviewed articles' limiter.

You can see here we have a result of 387. Okay, so let us have a look at how we can view this resource online. ok, we will just scroll down to this article and we will click on the 'view online' tab; and you can see it is available from a number of databases there. Okay, let us go ahead and open that up.

You can see there it takes you to a new window and there is the full PDF text for this article and you can view that online or download that.

We have 387 articles here -- let us try to narrow it down a little more. I am going to try everything after 2010. We will just do that and then click 'refine'.

Okay, let us refine our results a little more. You will see there is a number of options here on the side. Let us try this 'more options' tab. It open up, and you can see we have a number of different options available.

It opens up and you see we have a number of different options available. Let us just say I am interested in 'journalism' and 'politics'. Let us 'tick' these. We will go 'continue' and let us see what we get.

Just 82 results, and you can even further limit your results by using these 'facets' on the side. For example, by author, by publication, by resource type or by subject.

Okay, so that is just a basic introduction to using OneSearch. You can see how we started with around about 800 entries there and we have narrowed it down to about 80. You can use these 'limiters' on the side to further refine your results.

It is also worth investigating some of the 'search tips' that are available on the OneSearch homepage via this tab. Inside you will find greater detail about more complex search techniques.

Slide Five

Building your search:

Search operators help you get the best results by specifying how the key concepts are searched. Watch this animation to learn more: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=VG9M8SPhgpc

Animation description

The image shows blue and black squares. Searching for the words blue OR square retrieves blue squares as well as black squares. Searching for the words blue AND square retrieves only blue squares (fewer results). Searching for the exact phrase “blue squares” using double quotation marks retrieves an even smaller set of results. [End of animation]

Journal articles are collected in a variety of databases which sometimes provide more focused search results than using OneSearch. This is because they use specialised subject terms specific to a subject area.

Also, OneSearch does not search *all* databases to which UWA has access, so you get more comprehensive results if you try other search tools. You can access the databases through the library’s subject guides or through OneSearch. This is especially important if you’re off campus.

If the full text for the journal article is not within the database you are searching, look for the “Find it at UWA” link, which will check to see if you can access the article through another online database.

OR expands search using synonyms,


AND Narrows a search by combining terms,
“” Using quotation marks will return only those exact words in that exact order.

Slide Six

The EXCLUDE function (under “more options”) can be used in OneSearch to help you narrow your results.



Slide Seven

How can you improve your search results? Test your ability to expand or reduce your results.

DRAG the boxes above and DROP them into the correct heading below:


  • add concepts using “AND”

  • Remove concepts using the “EXCLUDE” Function

  • Add limits (such as year, material type, subject)

You can expand your search criteria by:

  • Remove limits (such as year, material type, subject)

  • Include synonyms, using “OR”

Slide Eight

Finding Scholarly Information

You can find scholarly, also known as peer reviewed, articles in OneSearch.

Tip, the view online link in OneSearch will take you to the article.

Slide Nine

Decide What Sources You Need

Your lecturer may suggest using particular types of resources. Why does it matter? Good Sources = good assignments.

Click on the image to learn more about the different types of sources:

Tertiary: sources that review or summarize well-established areas of knowledge or practice. Often give an overview of existing primary and secondary materials Great starting point for researching a topic.

Secondary: sources that analyse, interpret, argue, review report on or present existing and emerging knowledge or provide new perspectives.

Primary: Documents or artworks created in the context or period that is being studied. They can be evidence of a thought or understanding at a particular moment in time. Can also refer to a new and original idea or area of research.

Slide Ten

Find The Best Evidence

Finding Scholarly Information

You can also find scholarly articles in other online databases. View the UWA library Subject Guides for advice on databases for your subject.

Want more info? Click here to listen to more information about finding journal articles.

Journal articles are collected in a variety of databases which sometimes provide more focused search results than using OneSearch. This is because they use specialised subject terms specific to a subject area.

Also, OneSearch does not search *all* databases to which UWA has access, so you get more comprehensive results if you try other search tools. You can access the databases through the library’s subject guides or through OneSearch. This is especially important if you’re off campus.

If the full text for the journal article is not within the database you are searching, look for the “Find it at UWA” link, which will check to see if you can access the article through another online database.



Slide 11

Find The Best Evidence

Finding scholarly information.

Have you heard of Google Scholar? It can be used for finding scholarly resources across a variety of subject disciplines and formats

TIP: When using google scholar, go to the settings to add UWA as a Library Link. Then you will be able to access full-text articles via UWA.



Slide 12

Find The Best Evidence

In this activity, match the information resources to the best search tool:






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