Thinking through History at Tallis


The emergence of the Arminians



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The emergence of the Arminians


The early Arminian challenge


The Laudian reforms, 1628-1640






Role 2: Website Researcher

Role 3: Youtube Researcher










Role 4: Picture Researcher




























Role 5: Group Analysis on extent of change and Presenter.







Activity 2

Parliament’s reordering of the church, 1640–49, p. 46-48.


Role 1: Textbook Researcher and scribe.

The rejection of Arminianism in the Long Parliament, 1640-1643


Radicalism and reaction during the Civil War 1


Radicalism and reaction during the Civil War 2


The Rump and the radicals


The Protectorate






Role 2: Website Researcher

Role 3: Youtube Researcher










Role 4: Picture Researcher




























Role 5: Group Analysis on extent of change and Presenter.





Activity 3

Puritanism under Charles I, p. 50-51.


Role 1: Textbook Researcher and scribe.

The emergence of the sects


Charles and the Puritans






Role 2: Website Researcher

Role 3: Youtube Researcher










Role 4: Picture Researcher




























Role 5: Group Analysis on extent of change and Presenter.






Activity 4

Catholic influence within Charles I’s court, p. 58-60.


Role 1: Textbook Researcher and scribe.

The origins and development of anti-Catholicism


Charles I and Catholicism 1


Charles I and Catholicism 2






Role 2: Website Researcher

Role 3: Youtube Researcher










Role 4: Picture Researcher




























Role 5: Group Analysis on extent of change and Presenter.





Activity 5

Examples Theme 2 : Religion: conflict and dissent, 1625-49.
Section A.

Understanding of the period in breadth and target content specified in the themes, questions may cross themes, questions cover periods of at least 10 years covering any A01 concepts (causes and consequences, changes and continuity, similarity and difference, significance).


EITHER

1 To what extent was religious policy responsible for the problems which faced the monarchy in the years 1625–49? Make specific reference to religious, political, economic and social themes.

(Total for Question 1 = 20 marks)
OR
2 To what extent was religious developments responsible for political instability in the years 1625–49? Make specific reference to religious, political, economic and social themes.

(Total for Question 2 = 20 marks)



Section B.

Understanding of the period in breadth and target content specified in the themes, questions may cross themes, questions cover periods of at least a third of the timespan of the themes covering any A01 concepts (causes and consequences, changes and continuity, similarity and difference, significance).


EITHER

3 How far do you agree that the Church of England was transformed in the years

1625–60? Make specific reference to religious, political, economic and social themes.

(Total for Question 3 = 20 marks)


OR
4 How accurate is it to say that fear of Catholicism was fundamental to the discontent faced by the monarchy in the years 1625–60? Make specific reference to religious, political, economic and social themes.

(Total for Question 4 = 20 marks)




Cracking the Puzzle: Preparing for Revision and Assessment
Activity 1 : Complete Trigger Memory Activity using your background notes. An explanation on how to complete this is in your guidance booklet.

Activity 2 : There are many excellent websites which can be used to revisit the material covered so far. You should download some of these resources to supplement your main areas of note taking in this period. These include -
In studying Theme 1, students need to understand the nature of Stuart rule and the reasons why the system failed to provide a stable system of government in the given period. They should understand Charles I’s political ambitions and the extent of parliamentary opposition to the king resulting in the complete breakdown of the relationship. Detailed knowledge of the events of the civil wars is not required, but students should understand the growing political and military power of parliament in the years to 1646, and Charles’ unwillingness to compromise his royal authority. In studying Theme 2, students should be aware of the diversity of religious beliefs and opinions during the given period.They should understand Laud’s attempts to impose Arminian practices and beliefs, and the opposition to religious uniformity in both England and Scotland. The failure of monarchical government, 1625–46: Charles I and parliament, 1625–29; personal rule and its failure, 1629–40 and the failure to compromise, 1640–49.




Activity 3 Paper 1 AS and A Level Section A
Section A Technique AS Level Cause or consequence 40 minutes. Three main parts.
2 mins planning for top 3 factors, 5 top points for each, and relative significance.
Introduction. X certainly made a significant contribution to Q, along with Y and Z. It is argued that whilst the interaction of these factors were responsible for Q, Z was the most significant factor. 2 minutes
Part 1 X made a significant contribution to Q. Top 5 points, however it was not sufficient to cause Q without Y and Z because. Its overall contribution was to provide an important stimulus by...10 minutes

Part 2 Y made a more significant contribution to Q. Top 5 points, however it was not sufficient to cause Q without X and Z because. Its overall contribution was to provide an important stimulus by...10 minutes

Part 3 Z made the most significant contribution to Q. Top 5 points, however it was not sufficient to cause Q on its own without the interaction of X and Y because. It was however the most significant contribution to Q because...10 minutes
Conclusion The essential interaction of factors along with their relative significance is finally commented upon. 6 mins

Section A Technique A Level All concepts 40 minutes. Two main parts.
The stems‘ How far...’,‘To what extent did/was...’,‘How accurate is it to say that...’will be used in Sections A and B. The initial stem used at AS can be followed by a range of concept targets, and at A level a wider range of stem variants will be used. Additionally, more nuanced or complex judgements are required at A level,for example an A level question might ask whether it could be called a‘ transformation’. AS questions are less likely to use adjectival/adverbial qualifiers: they are more likely to ask about ‘features’ of an era (rather than‘ fundamental features’) and are less likely to require two aspects of content to be related together. So AS questions are more likely to ask how far a policy ‘failed’ (rather than ask if it‘ failed to meet its aims’); and how far a country ‘benefited’ from a course of action (rather than how far the ‘benefits outweighed the drawbacks’).
You will be able to find a full range of suggested writing techniques for all concepts for A Level Section A on the following link.

A Level Section A and B Thinking and Writing Technique for all concepts.

Activity 4 Paper 1 AS and A Level Section B
Section B Technique for AS and A Level 40 minutes

In Section B AS, the following three stems are used:

●How far.../significant.../important was...? ●To what extent did/was...?●How accurate is it to say that...?

Any of the three can be used to target any of the concepts. Here the student must recognise whether the statement which follows requires a judgement about change, causation, consequence, significance or the extent of similarity/difference.
2 mins planning for top 3 factors, 5 top points for each, and relative significance.
Introduction. X certainly made a significant contribution to Q, along with Y and Z. It is argued that whilst the interaction of these factors were responsible for Q, Z was the most significant factor. 2 minutes
Part 1 X made a significant contribution to Q. Top 5 points, however it was not sufficient to cause Q without Y and Z because. Its overall contribution was to provide an important stimulus by...10 minutes

Part 2 Y made a more significant contribution to Q. Top 5 points, however it was not sufficient to cause Q without X and Z because. Its overall contribution was to provide an important stimulus by...10 minutes

Part 3 Z made the most significant contribution to Q. Top 5 points, however it was not sufficient to cause Q on its own without the interaction of X and Y because. It was however the most significant contribution to Q because...10 minutes
Conclusion The essential interaction of factors along with their relative significance is finally commented upon. 6 mins
Section B Technique A Level All concepts 40 minutes. Two main parts.

The stems‘ How far...’,‘To what extent did/was...’,‘How accurate is it to say that...’will be used in Sections A and B. The initial stem used at AS can be followed by a range of concept targets, and at A level a wider range of stem variants will be used. Additionally, more nuanced or complex judgements are required at A level,for example an A level question might ask whether it could be called a‘ transformation’. AS questions are less likely to use adjectival/adverbial qualifiers: they are more likely to ask about ‘features’ of an era (rather than‘ fundamental features’) and are less likely to require two aspects of content to be related together. So AS questions are more likely to ask how far a policy ‘failed’ (rather than ask if it‘ failed to meet its aims’); and how far a country ‘benefited’ from a course of action (rather than how far the ‘benefits outweighed the drawbacks’).
You will be able to find a full range of suggested writing techniques for all concepts for A Level Section B on the following link.

A Level Section A and B Thinking and Writing Technique for all concepts


Specimen and Past Questions . Specimen
Section A. Understanding of the period in breadth and target content specified in the themes, questions may cross themes, questions cover periods of at least 10 years covering any A01 concepts (Causes, consequences, change, continuity, similarity, difference, significance).
EITHER

1 To what extent was Charles I personally responsible for the problems which faced the monarchy in the years 1629–46? Make specific reference to political, religious, economic and social themes.

(Total for Question 1 = 20 marks)
OR

2 To what extent was military involvement in politics responsible for political instability in the years 1646–60? Make specific reference to political, religious, economic and social themes.

(Total for Question 2 = 20 marks)

Section B. Understanding of the period in breadth and target content specified in the themes, questions may cross themes, questions cover periods of at least a third of the timespan of the themes covering any A01 concepts (Causes, consequences, change, continuity, similarity, difference, significance).
EITHER

3 How far do you agree that the British economy was transformed in the years

1625–85? Make specific reference to political, religious, economic and social themes.

(Total for Question 3 = 20 marks)


OR

4 How accurate is it to say that fear of Catholicism was fundamental to the discontent faced by the monarchy in the years 1660–88? Make specific reference to political, religious, economic and social themes.

(Total for Question 4 = 20 marks)
June 2016

Section A

EITHER

1? (Total for Question 1 = 20 marks)



OR

2 ? (Total for Question 2 = 20 marks)


Section B

EITHER


3 ? (Total for Question 3 = 20 marks)

OR

4 ? (Total for Question 4 = 20 marks)


June 2018


Markscheme

AS Level




A Level

L1 1–4

• Simple or generalised statements are made about the topic.

• Some accurate and relevant knowledge is included, but it lacks range and depth and does not directly address the question.

• The overall judgement is missing or asserted.

• There is little, if any, evidence of attempts to structure the answer and the answer overall lacks coherence and precision.

L1 1–3

L2 5–10

• Descriptive statements are made about key features of the period which are relevant to the topic in general terms, but they display limited analysis and are not clearly shown to relate to the question.

• Mostly accurate and relevant knowledge is included, but it lacks range or depth and has only implicit links to the demands and conceptual focus of the question.

• An overall judgement is given but with limited substantiation and the criteria for judgement are left implicit.

• The answer shows some attempts at organisation, but most of the answer is lacking in coherence, clarity and precision.

L2 4–7

L3 11–16

• Descriptive passages are included, but there is some analysis and an attempt to explain links between the relevant key features of the period and the question.

• Mostly accurate and relevant knowledge is included to demonstrate some understanding of the demands and conceptual focus of the question, but material lacks range or depth.

• Attempts are made to establish criteria for judgement and to relate the overall judgement to them, although with weak substantiation.

• The answer shows some organisation. The general trend of the argument is clear, but parts of it lack logic, coherence and precision.

L3 8–12


L4 17–20

• Key issues relevant to the question are explored by an analysis of the relationships between key features of the period, although treatment of issues may be uneven.

• Sufficient knowledge is deployed to demonstrate understanding of the demands and conceptual focus of the question, and to meet most of its demands.

• Valid criteria by which the question can be judged are established and applied in the process of coming to a judgement. Although some of the evaluations may be only partly substantiated, the overall judgement is supported.

• The answer is generally well organised. The argument is logical and is communicated with clarity, although in a few places it may lack coherence and precision.

L4 13–16




• Key issues relevant to the question are explored by a sustained analysis of the relationships between key features of the period.

• Sufficient knowledge is deployed to demonstrate understanding of the demands and conceptual focus of the question, and to respond fully to its demands.

• Valid criteria by which the question can be judged are established and applied and their relative significance evaluated in the process of reaching and substantiating the overall judgement.

• The answer is well organised. The argument is logical and coherent throughout .

L5 17–20



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