The Short Story Test Review



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The Short Story Test Review
1. In Walter Mitty's daydreams, other characters treat him respectfully.

2. Judging from what she says and does, Mrs. Mitty feels irritated and annoyed with her husband.


3. Mrs. Mitty is a flat character because she has only one main character trait.


4. In his daydreams, Walter Mitty imagines that he has courage.


5. Walter Mitty is a round character because he is meek on the outside but bold in his daydreams


6. Thurber includes Walter Mitty's daydreams in his story to reveal his character.


7. Thurber begins his story with the daydream of Mitty commanding a navy seaplane in a storm because he wants to grab the reader's interest.

8. The author's purpose in including this passage in “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” is to show that Mrs. Mitty orders her husband around.
“Not so fast! You're driving too fast!” said Mrs. Mitty. “What are you driving so fast for?”

9. In this passage from Thurber's story, the garageman grinning when he comes to help Walter Mitty unwind the chains from his tires because he is laughing at Mitty.


Once he had tried to take his chains off, outside New Milford, and he had got them wound around the axles. A man had had to come out in a wrecking car and unwind them, a young, grinning garageman.

10. “The Most Dangerous Game” is best described as a deadly contest between two hunters.

11. Connell creates suspense at the beginning of the story when Whitney describes the mysterious reputation of the island they are passing.

12. The first main event in “The Most Dangerous Game” is when Rainsford falls overboard.


13. The main conflict in “The Most Dangerous Game” is Rainsford vs. Zaroff


14. General Zaroff's problem is that he cares only for hunting, but hunting has begun to bore him, so he invents his “game”.


15. Zaroff does not consider his sport immoral because he believes that the weak were put on earth to give the strong pleasure.

16. Zaroff tells Rainsford that the visitors to the island always choose to go hunting with him. You can infer from this remark that they are willing to take their chances in the hunt rather than be tortured by Ivan.


17. You infer from Zaroff's careful studying of Rainsford during their first dinner together that he is trying to find out what kind of an enemy Rainsford would make.


18. The resolution of the main conflict in “The Most Dangerous Game” is when Rainsford appears in Zaroff's bedroom.

19. In the conflict with Rainsford, Zaroff's overconfidence contributes to his own defeat.

20. “Bitter quarrels are foolish” best describes the overall message of “The Interlopers”.


21. The mood, or atmosphere, at the beginning of “The Interlopers” is dark and foreboding.


22. You can make the inference about Ulrich at the beginning of the story that he is angry and hopes to find his enemy.


23. In “The Interlopers,” Ulrich go into the woods on the night of the story He suspects that Georg is poaching in the forest.


24. In Saki's story, both men had expected to fight each other. Instead, the two men are pinned by a huge fallen tree. The literary term irony best describes this change in situation.


25. When Ulrich offers Georg a drink from his wine flask, you can make the inference that he is beginning to feel more friendly toward Georg.

26. Ulrich crys out in joy when the figures coming down the hill.

27. The following passage from “The Interlopers” is considered ironic because the men mistakenly assume that the figures are human.

“‘How many of them are there?’ asked Georg.

‘I can't see distinctly,’ said Ulrich; ‘nine or ten.’

‘Then they are yours,’ said Georg; ‘I had only seven out with me.’

‘They are making all the speed they can, brave lads,’ said Ulrich gladly.”


28. What makes the ending of “The Interlopers” surprising is that the figures in the woods are not what they appear to be.


29. Ulrich's and Georg's feelings toward each other change during the story from hatred to friendship.




30. The word grim (unpleasant, depressing) best describes the tone at the end of Saki's story.

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