The Pen is Mightier Than the Sword Tour teks: Grades 9-12 Political Cartoons



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The Pen is Mightier Than the Sword Tour TEKS: Grades 9-12

Political Cartoons:

§113.41. United States History Studies Since 1877 (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012

(4)  History. The student understands the emergence of the United States as a world power between 1898 and 1920. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain why significant events, policies, and individuals such as the Spanish-American War, U.S. expansionism, Henry Cabot Lodge, Alfred Thayer Mahan, Theodore Roosevelt, Sanford B. Dole, and missionaries moved the United States into the position of a world power;

(B)  evaluate American expansionism, including acquisitions such as Guam, Hawaii, the Philippines, and Puerto Rico;

(C)  identify the causes of World War I and reasons for U.S. entry;

(D)  understand the contributions of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) led by General John J. Pershing;

(E)  analyze the impact of significant technological innovations in World War I such as machine guns, airplanes, tanks, poison gas, and trench warfare that resulted in the stalemate on the Western Front;

(F)  analyze major issues such as isolationism and neutrality raised by U.S. involvement in World War I, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the Treaty of Versailles; and

(7)  History. The student understands the domestic and international impact of U.S. participation in World War II. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify reasons for U.S. involvement in World War II, including Italian, German, and Japanese dictatorships and their aggression, especially the attack on Pearl Harbor;

(B)  evaluate the domestic and international leadership of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry Truman during World War II, including the U.S. relationship with its allies and domestic industry's rapid mobilization for the war effort;

(C)  analyze the function of the U.S. Office of War Information;

(D)  analyze major issues of World War II, including the Holocaust; the internment of German, Italian, and Japanese Americans and Executive Order 9066; and the development of conventional and atomic weapons;

(E)  analyze major military events of World War II, including the Battle of Midway, the U.S. military advancement through the Pacific Islands, the Bataan Death March, the invasion of Normandy, fighting the war on multiple fronts, and the liberation of concentration camps;

(F)  evaluate the military contributions of leaders during World War II, including Omar Bradley, Dwight Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, Chester A. Nimitz, George Marshall, and George Patton; and

(G)  explain the home front and how American patriotism inspired exceptional actions by citizens and military personnel, including high levels of military enlistment; volunteerism; the purchase of war bonds; Victory Gardens; the bravery and contributions of the Tuskegee Airmen, the Flying Tigers, and the Navajo Code Talkers; and opportunities and obstacles for women and ethnic minorities.

(8)  History. The student understands the impact of significant national and international decisions and conflicts in the Cold War on the United States. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe U.S. responses to Soviet aggression after World War II, including the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the Berlin airlift, and John F. Kennedy's role in the Cuban Missile Crisis;

(B)  describe how Cold War tensions were intensified by the arms race, the space race, McCarthyism, and the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), the findings of which were confirmed by the Venona Papers;

(C)  explain reasons and outcomes for U.S. involvement in the Korean War and its relationship to the containment policy;

(D)  explain reasons and outcomes for U.S. involvement in foreign countries and their relationship to the Domino Theory, including the Vietnam War;

(E)  analyze the major issues and events of the Vietnam War such as the Tet Offensive, the escalation of forces, Vietnamization, and the fall of Saigon; and

(F)  describe the responses to the Vietnam War such as the draft, the 26th Amendment, the role of the media, the credibility gap, the silent majority, and the anti-war movement.

(29)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  use a variety of both primary and secondary valid sources to acquire information and to analyze and answer historical questions;

(B)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing and contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations, making predictions, drawing inferences, and drawing conclusions;

(C)  understand how historians interpret the past (historiography) and how their interpretations of history may change over time;

(D)  use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple types of sources of evidence;

(E)  evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author, including points of view, frames of reference, and historical context;

(F)  identify bias in written, oral, and visual material;

(G)  identify and support with historical evidence a point of view on a social studies issue or event; and

(H)  use appropriate skills to analyze and interpret social studies information such as maps, graphs, presentations, speeches, lectures, and political cartoons.

(30)  Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A)  create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information;

(B)  use correct social studies terminology to explain historical concepts; and

(C)  use different forms of media to convey information, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using available computer software as appropriate.

(31)  Social studies skills. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:

(A)  create thematic maps, graphs, and charts representing various aspects of the United States; and

(B)  pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns shown on maps, graphs, charts, and available databases.

(32)  Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(B)  use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.



§113.42. World History Studies (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012.

(10)  History. The student understands the causes and impact of World War I. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the importance of imperialism, nationalism, militarism, and the alliance system in causing World War I;

(B)  identify major characteristics of World War I, including total war, trench warfare, modern military technology, and high casualty rates;

(C)  explain the political impact of Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points and the political and economic impact of the Treaty of Versailles, including changes in boundaries and the mandate system; and

(D)  identify the causes of the February (March) and October revolutions of 1917 in Russia, their effects on the outcome of World War I, and the Bolshevik establishment of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

(29)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify methods used by archaeologists, anthropologists, historians, and geographers to analyze evidence;

(B)  explain how historians, when examining sources, analyze frame of reference, historical context, and point of view to interpret historical events;

(C)  explain the differences between primary and secondary sources and examine those sources to analyze frame of reference, historical context, and point of view;

(D)  evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author;

(E)  identify bias in written, oral, and visual material;

(F)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, drawing inferences and conclusions, and developing connections between historical events over time;

(G)  construct a thesis on a social studies issue or event supported by evidence; and

(H)  use appropriate reading and mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

(30)  Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A)  use social studies terminology correctly;

(B)  use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation;

(C)  interpret and create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information; and

(D)  transfer information from one medium to another.

(4)  History. The student understands the emergence of the United States as a world power between 1898 and 1920. The student is expected to:

(A)  explain why significant events, policies, and individuals such as the Spanish-American War, U.S. expansionism, Henry Cabot Lodge, Alfred Thayer Mahan, Theodore Roosevelt, Sanford B. Dole, and missionaries moved the United States into the position of a world power;

(B)  evaluate American expansionism, including acquisitions such as Guam, Hawaii, the Philippines, and Puerto Rico;

(C)  identify the causes of World War I and reasons for U.S. entry;

(D)  understand the contributions of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) led by General John J. Pershing;

(E)  analyze the impact of significant technological innovations in World War I such as machine guns, airplanes, tanks, poison gas, and trench warfare that resulted in the stalemate on the Western Front;

(F)  analyze major issues such as isolationism and neutrality raised by U.S. involvement in World War I, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the Treaty of Versailles; and

§113.44. United States Government (One-Half Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012.

(b)  Introduction

(2)  To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich primary and secondary source material such as the complete text of the U.S. Constitution, selected Federalist Papers, landmark cases of the U.S. Supreme Court (such as those studied in Grade 8 and U.S. History Since 1877), biographies, autobiographies, memoirs, speeches, letters, and periodicals that feature analyses of political issues and events is encouraged.

(20)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;

(B)  create a product on a contemporary government issue or topic using critical methods of inquiry;

(C)  analyze and defend a point of view on a current political issue;

(D)  analyze and evaluate the validity of information, arguments, and counterarguments from primary and secondary sources for bias, propaganda, point of view, and frame of reference;

(E)  evaluate government data using charts, tables, graphs, and maps; and

(F)  use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

(21)  Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A)  use social studies terminology correctly;

(B)  use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation;

(C)  transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate; and

(D)  create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information.

(22)  Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(B)  use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.



Speeches:

§113.41. United States History Studies Since 1877 (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012

(c)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  History. The student understands the principles included in the Celebrate Freedom Week program. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze and evaluate the text, intent, meaning, and importance of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, and identify the full text of the first three paragraphs of the Declaration of Independence;

(B)  analyze and evaluate the application of these founding principles to historical events in U.S. history; and

(C)  explain the contributions of the Founding Fathers such as Benjamin Rush, John Hancock, John Jay, John Witherspoon, John Peter Muhlenberg, Charles Carroll, and Jonathan Trumbull Sr.

(2)  History. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in U.S. history from 1877 to the present. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify the major characteristics that define an historical era;

(B)  identify the major eras in U.S. history from 1877 to the present and describe their defining characteristics;

(C)  apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals, events, and time periods;

(7)  History. The student understands the domestic and international impact of U.S. participation in World War II. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify reasons for U.S. involvement in World War II, including Italian, German, and Japanese dictatorships and their aggression, especially the attack on Pearl Harbor;

(B)  evaluate the domestic and international leadership of Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry Truman during World War II, including the U.S. relationship with its allies and domestic industry's rapid mobilization for the war effort;

(C)  analyze the function of the U.S. Office of War Information;

(D)  analyze major issues of World War II, including the Holocaust; the internment of German, Italian, and Japanese Americans and Executive Order 9066; and the development of conventional and atomic weapons;

(E)  analyze major military events of World War II, including the Battle of Midway, the U.S. military advancement through the Pacific Islands, the Bataan Death March, the invasion of Normandy, fighting the war on multiple fronts, and the liberation of concentration camps;

(F)  evaluate the military contributions of leaders during World War II, including Omar Bradley, Dwight Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, Chester A. Nimitz, George Marshall, and George Patton; and

(G)  explain the home front and how American patriotism inspired exceptional actions by citizens and military personnel, including high levels of military enlistment; volunteerism; the purchase of war bonds; Victory Gardens; the bravery and contributions of the Tuskegee Airmen, the Flying Tigers, and the Navajo Code Talkers; and opportunities and obstacles for women and ethnic minorities.

(8)  History. The student understands the impact of significant national and international decisions and conflicts in the Cold War on the United States. The student is expected to:

(A)  describe U.S. responses to Soviet aggression after World War II, including the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the Berlin airlift, and John F. Kennedy's role in the Cuban Missile Crisis;

(B)  describe how Cold War tensions were intensified by the arms race, the space race, McCarthyism, and the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), the findings of which were confirmed by the Venona Papers;

(C)  explain reasons and outcomes for U.S. involvement in the Korean War and its relationship to the containment policy;

(D)  explain reasons and outcomes for U.S. involvement in foreign countries and their relationship to the Domino Theory, including the Vietnam War;

(E)  analyze the major issues and events of the Vietnam War such as the Tet Offensive, the escalation of forces, Vietnamization, and the fall of Saigon; and

(F)  describe the responses to the Vietnam War such as the draft, the 26th Amendment, the role of the media, the credibility gap, the silent majority, and the anti-war movement.

(29)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  use a variety of both primary and secondary valid sources to acquire information and to analyze and answer historical questions;

(B)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing and contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations, making predictions, drawing inferences, and drawing conclusions;

(C)  understand how historians interpret the past (historiography) and how their interpretations of history may change over time;

(D)  use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple types of sources of evidence;

(E)  evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author, including points of view, frames of reference, and historical context;

(F)  identify bias in written, oral, and visual material;

(G)  identify and support with historical evidence a point of view on a social studies issue or event; and

(H)  use appropriate skills to analyze and interpret social studies information such as maps, graphs, presentations, speeches, lectures, and political cartoons.

(30)  Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A)  create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information;

(B)  use correct social studies terminology to explain historical concepts; and

(C)  use different forms of media to convey information, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using available computer software as appropriate.

(31)  Social studies skills. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:

(A)  create thematic maps, graphs, and charts representing various aspects of the United States; and

(B)  pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns shown on maps, graphs, charts, and available databases.

(32)  Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(B)  use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.



§113.44. United States Government (One-Half Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012.

(b)  Introduction

(2)  To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich primary and secondary source material such as the complete text of the U.S. Constitution, selected Federalist Papers, landmark cases of the U.S. Supreme Court (such as those studied in Grade 8 and U.S. History Since 1877), biographies, autobiographies, memoirs, speeches, letters, and periodicals that feature analyses of political issues and events is encouraged.

(20)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;

(B)  create a product on a contemporary government issue or topic using critical methods of inquiry;

(C)  analyze and defend a point of view on a current political issue;

(D)  analyze and evaluate the validity of information, arguments, and counterarguments from primary and secondary sources for bias, propaganda, point of view, and frame of reference;

(E)  evaluate government data using charts, tables, graphs, and maps; and

(F)  use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

(21)  Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A)  use social studies terminology correctly;

(B)  use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation;

(C)  transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate; and

(D)  create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information.

(22)  Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A)  use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(B)  use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.



§110.57. Public Speaking I, II, III (One-Half to One Credit).

(b)  Knowledge and skills.

(1)  Rhetoric. The student traces the development of the rhetorical perspective. The student is expected to:

(A)  recognize the influence of classical rhetoric in shaping Western thought;

(B)  explain and use the classical rhetorical canons of invention, organization, style, memory, and delivery;

(C)  analyze how modern public address influences public opinion and policy in a democratic republic;

(D)  analyze the ethical responsibilities that accompany freedom of speech;

(E)  develop and use critical, deliberative, empathic, and appreciative listening skills to analyze and evaluate speeches; and

(F)  apply knowledge and understanding of rhetoric to analyze and evaluate oral or written speeches.

(2)  Speech forms. The student recognizes and analyzes varied speech forms. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and analyze the traditional elements of speech form, including introduction, body, and conclusion;

(B)  identify and analyze logical patterns of organization for specific speech forms;

(C)  identify and analyze the characteristics of a speech to inform;

(D)  identify and analyze the characteristics of a speech to persuade, including propositions of fact, value, problem, and/or policy;

(E)  identify and analyze characteristics of speeches for special occasions; and

(F)  analyze and evaluate the rhetorical elements in models of speeches that inform, persuade, or inspire.

(3)  Invention. The student plans speeches. The student is expected to:

(A)  identify and analyze the audience and occasion as a basis for choosing speech strategies;

(B)  select and limit topics for speeches considering his/her own interests, timeliness, and the importance of the topic;

(C)  select and limit purposes for speeches;

(D)  research topics using primary and secondary sources, including electronic technology; and

(E)  analyze oral and written speech models to evaluate the topic, purpose, audience, and occasion.

(4)  Organization. The student organizes speeches. The student is expected to:

(A)  apply knowledge of speech form to organize and design speeches;

(B)  organize speeches effectively for specific topics, purposes, audiences, and occasions;

(C)  choose logical patterns of organization for bodies of speech;

(D)  prepare outlines reflecting logical organization; and

(E)  analyze and evaluate the organization of oral or written speech models.

(6)  Style. The student develops skills in using oral language in public speeches. The student is expected to:

(A)  distinguish between oral and written language styles;

(B)  write manuscripts to facilitate language choices and enhance oral style;

(C)  use rhetorical and stylistic devices to achieve clarity, force, and aesthetic effect;

(D)  use informal, standard, and technical language appropriately;

(E)  employ previews, transitions, summaries, signposts, and other appropriate rhetorical strategies to enhance clarity; and

(F)  evaluate a speaker's style in oral or written speech models.

(7)  Delivery. The student uses appropriate strategies for rehearsing and presenting speeches. The student is expected to:

(A)  employ techniques and strategies to reduce communication apprehension, develop self-confidence, and facilitate command of information and ideas;

(B)  rehearse and employ a variety of delivery strategies;

(C)  develop verbal, vocal, and physical skills to enhance presentations;

(D)  use notes, manuscripts, rostrum, visual aids, and/or electronic devices; and

(E)  interact with audiences appropriately.

(8)  Evaluation. The student analyzes and evaluates speeches. The student is expected to:

(A)  use critical, deliberative, and appreciative listening skills to evaluate speeches; and

(B)  critique speeches using knowledge of rhetorical principles.






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