The Hermitage Honors Black History Month nashville, Tenn



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Media Contact:

Jason Nelson

Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage: Home of the People’s President

(615) 889-2941, ext. 223



jnelson@thehermitage.com

The Hermitage Honors Black History Month

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Feb. 3, 2016) – During Black History Month this February, Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage will host four featured weekly programs and partner with various libraries for additional grant-funded education programs to explore the progress made by African-Americans.
Programs at The Hermitage:
Saturday, Feb. 6, 1–4 p.m.

During the “Preserving Your Family History” presentation held off-site at The Hermitage Public Library, attendees will hear from Nashville’s Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society and Dr. Kelly Kolar, professor of history at Middle Tennessee State University, as they share tips on navigating library archives, online resources and other sources for family history research. The Hermitage’s assistant curator, Ashley Bouknight, will share advice on keeping family documents, photographs and other keepsakes in good condition.


Saturday, Feb. 13, 1 p.m.

The Hermitage will hold its annual memorial service commemorating and honoring members of the enslaved community at The Hermitage and throughout the country. Gospel group Broken will perform, and 150 flowers will be laid, marking the names of all those known to have been enslaved at The Hermitage.


Saturday, Feb. 20, 11 a.m.–noon

During Nashville Public Library’s Puppet Truck show, local Boy and Girl Scout troops will have the opportunity to earn a badge by attending “Anansi the Spider,” based on an African fable.


Saturday, Feb. 27, 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.

The program “Sisters’ Voices: The Music and Words of Enslaved Women” will feature a musical lecture using music, poetry, storytelling and narrative from Dr. Naima J. Bush.


All programs are free but do not include admission into The Hermitage. A toolkit with additional educational material is now available online and as a hard copy at http://thehermitage.com/black-history-month-toolkit/. For more information, visit http://thehermitage.com/

A full list of events with dates and times is below and on The Hermitage’s website: http://thehermitage.com/event/black-history-month-2/.


Preserving Your Family History

Saturday, Feb. 6, at The Hermitage Public Library
1 p.m.: “How To Start Your Genealogy Journey”

With Dr. Kelly Kolar, professor of history at Middle Tennessee State University, and members of Nashville’s Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society


1:40 p.m.: “Preserve Your Family Trees”

With Ashley Bouknight, The Hermitage’s assistant curator


2 p.m.: Individual Consultations

Individual Q&A appointments regarding genealogy research and preserving family heirlooms


Annual Memorial Service featuring gospel group Broken

Saturday, Feb. 13, at The Hermitage Church (on the grounds of The Hermitage)
1 p.m.: Music, special remarks and laying of 150 flowers, each representing a member of The Hermitage’s slaved community
Nashville Public Library’s Puppet Truck

Saturday, Feb. 20, at Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage
10–11 a.m.: “Anansi the Spider” Performance (open to the public)
11 a.m.–2 p.m.: “Scout History Day” (pre-registration required)
Sisters’ Voices: The Music and Words of Enslaved Women featuring Dr. Naima J. Bush

Saturday, Feb. 27, at Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage
Performances at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.
Slavery at The Hermitage” Outreach Programs
Tuesday, Feb. 2, at 4:15 p.m., Bellevue Branch Library. For fourth–12th grades.
Wednesday, Feb. 3, from 4–5 p.m., Edgehill Branch Library. For fourth–12th grades.
Thursday, Feb. 4, 6–7 p.m., Old Hickory Branch Library. General public.
Saturday, Feb. 6, 2–3 p.m., Goodlettsville Branch Library. General public.
Thursday, Feb. 11, 6–7 p.m., Hermitage Branch Library. General public.
Tuesday, Feb. 16, 3:30–4:30 p.m., East Nashville Branch Library. For fourth–12th grades.
Thursday, Feb. 25, 4:30–5:30 p.m., Thompson Lane Branch Library. For fourth–12th grades.
About The Hermitage

Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage: Home of the People’s President is one of the largest, most well-preserved and most visited presidential homes in the United States. Opened to the public in 1889, The Hermitage is one of America’s first presidential museums. Today, The Hermitage is a 1,120-acre National Historic Landmark with 27 historic buildings, including Jackson’s mansion and tomb, restored slave cabins, a church, and gardens. In recent years, new interpretive initiatives and educational programs such as archaeology and the history of slavery have enhanced the experience of more than 180,000 annual visitors. A year ago, on Jan. 8, The Hermitage launched its newest exhibit, Andrew Jackson: Born for a Storm, which delves into the life of Andrew Jackson, including his military and presidential careers. For more information, visit www.thehermitage.com.



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