The epistle to the hebrews



Download 3.68 Mb.
Page8/102
Date27.05.2021
Size3.68 Mb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   102
om. et (bis).

:16 omnes.

:10 in sensibus eorum.

:17 om. non.

It has also many (apparently) unique renderings:

:1 audimus.

et ex uno.

:16 majorem sibi.

:17 immotabilitatem [‘i.e. immutabilitatem more Saxonico’ R. B.].

:25 ad dnm.

:5 monstratum.

:7 offerebat.

:13 de caetero, fratres, exspectans [H3 has in the mg. of 4:14 ajdelfoiv, and so Col. 3:4. D2 adds ajdelfoiv in 4:11, and 37 in 12:14].

:12 quae in ora est.

primogenita.

:5 filii mei nolite.

mouebat.

:10 deservierunt.

ut celerius (Harl. ut quo).

It agrees with Harl. in

:12 amictum inuoluens eos (Harl. inuolues).

:14 emundauit...uestram (se Bentl.).

:16 primitias suas.

:18 habeamus.


(b) The translation incorporated in the Vulgate appears to have been based upon a rendering originally distinct from that given by d, from which it differs markedly in its general style no less than in particular renderings. It was in all probability not made by the author of the translation of St Paul's Epistles; but this question requires a more complete examination than I have been able to give to it. The Greek text which it represents is much mixed. In very many cases it gives the oldest readings (e.g., Heb. 1:3; 3:1, 10; 4:7; 6:10; 7:21; 8:4, 12; 9:9; 10:30, 34, 38; 11:11; 12:18), but not unfrequently those which are later (e.g., 1:12; 5:4; 8:2, 11; 9:10, 11; 11:3; 12:28), and the best MSS. are often divided (e.g., 2:5, 14, 18).
(ii) Syriac.

(a) The version in the Syriac Vulgate (the Peshito) is held to be the work of a distinct translator (Wichelhaus, De vers. simpl. 86), but the question requires to be examined in detail. The position which the Epistle occupies in the version (see § 111.) is favourable to the belief that it was a separate work. The text of the Peshito in this Epistle is mixed. It contains many early readings (e.g., Heb. 1:2; 5:3, 9; 6:7, 10; 7:17, 23; 8:12; 9:11; 10:30, 34; 11:4, 32, 37; 12:3, 7, 18), and many late readings (e.g., 1:1, 3, 12; 2:14; 3:1, 9 f.; 7:14, 21; 8:2, 4; 10:34, 38; 11:3, 4 f.; 12:8; 13:4).

Many of the renderings are of interest (e.g., 2:9; 3:8; 4:7; 5:7 f.; 6:2, 4; 7:19, 26; 10:29, 33; 11:17, 19, 20; 12:1; 13:16).

Compare also the following passages: 2:13; 4:8, 16; 7:2, 11, 20; 8:9; 10:5, 11, 17; 11:11.

(b) The Harclean (Philoxenian) Syriac Version has now been made complete, the missing portion, 11:28 to the end, being found in the Cambridge MS. Though the text represented by the Harclean version is generally of a later type than that represented by the Peshito where the two versions differ (e.g., 1:2, 3; 8:4, 12; 9:10, 13, 28; 10:8, 30; 12:3, 18), it preserves some earlier readings (e.g., 1:5, 8; 2:14; 5:4; 10:2, 9, 28, 30). In some doubtful cases the two versions represent different ancient readings (e.g., 3:13; 4:2; 7:4; 9:10, 14; 10:11; 13:15).

The text of the missing portion has been printed by Prof. Bensly (The Harklean Version of the Epistle to the Hebrews, chap. 11:28-13:25, now edited for the first time with Introduction and Notes on the version of the Epistle....Cambridge, 1889). It contains the following variations from the text which I have printed:


Heb. 11:29 (dievbhsan) + oiJ "iJoi; jIsrahvl.

hJ + ejpilegomevnhv povrnh.

om. kai; 1o.

ejpil. gavr me.

B. te (or kai; B.) kai; S. kai; jI.

tw'n + a[llwnv pr.

stovma.

:3 eJautovn or auJtovn.

novqoi ejste; kai; oujc uiJoiv.

pa'sa dev.

o[rei yhl.

Mwush'" + gavr.

para; to; tou' {A.

parait. to;n ejpi; gh'" crhm.

e[comen...latreuvomen.

aijdou'" kai; eujlabeiva".

:4 povrn. dev.

+ kai; ouj fob.

peripathvsante" (probably).

dij aujtou' + ou\n.

pepoivqamen.

e[comen ejn pa'sin (so connected).

jIhsou'n + Cristovn.

om. ajgaqw'/.

ejn uJmi'n.

om. tw'n aijwvnwn.

+ jAmhvn.
(iii) Egyptian.
(a) Memphitic (Coptic). The Epistle is contained entire in this early and important version.

The Greek text which the version represents is of great excellence (e.g., Heb. 1:2, 3, 8; 2:14; 3:1, 2, 9; 4:12; 5:1; 7:4, 23; 8:4, 11; 9:2, 10, 11; 10:8, 15, 30, 34; 11:3, 5, 11; 12:18, 20; 13:4); but it has an admixture of later readings (e.g., 1:12; 5:10; 6:10, 16; 7:21; 8:2, 12; 10:16, 38); and some readings which, though early, are certainly wrong (e.g., 2:6; 9:14; 10:32; 13:20).

(b) Thebaic (Sahidic). Of this version the following fragments have been published:

:11 eij—21 aijw'na.

:2 skhnhv—10 ejpikeivmena.

:24 ouj gavr—28 swthrivan.

:5 diov—10 ejfavpax.

:11 pivstei—22 ejneteivlato.

:1 toigarou'n—9 ejnetrepovmeqa.

ouj gavr—27 saleuovmena.

The value of the version may be seen by its renderings in the following passages: 9:10, 25, 26; 11:11; 12:7, 18.

(c) Bashmuric. The fragments of this version (quoted as AEg.), which was derived from the Thebaic, are

:4 jAarwvn—9 ejgevneto.

lovgou—6:3 poihvsomen.

:8-11, 15-7:5 ejntolhvn (more or less mutilated).

:8 ajpoqnhvskonte"—13 tau'ta.

ajkataluvtou—10:23 kaqarw'/.

The dependence of this version upon the Thebaic and the close agreement of the present text with that version in the passages which are found in both (yet see 9:2, 4, 10) gives great value to its evidence where the Thebaic is defective (e.g., 7:4, 22, 23; 8:1, 4, 11, 12; 9:11, 13, 14; 10:4). Its agreement with B and AEth. in 9:2, 4 is specially worthy of notice.

The text of the Egyptian versions offers a singularly interesting field of study. It would be instructive to tabulate in detail their coincidences even in this single epistle with B, A and C.

The Epistle is found entire in the later versions, Armenian, AEthiopic, Slavonic. It does not, however, seem to have been included in the Gothic; for the Epistle to Philemon is followed immediately by the Kalendar in the Ambrosian MS. A of the Epistles (E. Bernhardt, Vulfila oder die Gothische Bibel, s. 24.1875).

The text of the Epistle is on the whole well preserved, but there are some passages in which it is not unlikely that primitive errors have passed into all our existing copies; e.g., 4:2 (Addit. note); 11:4 (Addit. note), 37; 12:11; 13:21; see also 10:1 (Addit. note). Some primitive errors have been corrected in later MSS.: 7:1; 11:35.

The following passages offer variations of considerable interest, and serve as instructive exercises on the principles of textual criticism: 1:2, 8; 2:9 (Addit. note); 4:2 (Addit. note); 6:2, 3; 9:11; 10:34; 11:13; 12:7.

The general contrast between the early and later texts is well seen by an examination of the readings in: 1:2, 3, 12; 2:1, 14; 3:1, 9; 5:4; 6:10; 7:11, 16; 8:4, 11; 9:1, 9, 10; 11:3, 13; 12:15, 18, 20; 13:9.




Share with your friends:
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   102




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page