The church at Clifton Campville: lordship and community 12th and early 13th centuries


Figure 16: Tomb of Sir John Vernon of Harlaston and of his wife, Ellen – 1545



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Figure 16:

Tomb of Sir John Vernon of Harlaston and of his wife, Ellen – 1545
This tomb, dating from 1545, is in the Lady Chapel. There is some evidence that it might have been moved to its present position from a site nearer to the chancel.
Sir John Vernon had no specific connection with Clifton but he may have hoped to gain status by having a tomb in Clifton church and thus making a link with his ancestor who had married a Camville two hundred years earlier. It may also have been Sir John who, for the same reason, had the Camville and Vernon shields superimposed onto the south chapel wall painting.
Photo © I M Curr
The manor of Clifton Campville, and its church, benefited from investment by its lords during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries and from the partnership between lord and rector in the fourteenth. During the rest of the medieval period, absentee lords and non-resident rectors seem to have shown little interest in the development of the village. This lack of interest has contributed to the survival of the many medieval features in the church and its surroundings.

Endnotes
Abbreviations

HER Historic Environment Record (Staffordshire County Council)

SHC Staffordshire Historical Collections (Staffordshire Record Society)



VCH Victoria County History

1 D. Horovitz, The Place-Names of Staffordshire (2006), referring to document dated 1194 in SHC III (i) (1882), 25.


2 G. E. Cockayne, revised V. Gibbs and A. Doubleday, The Complete Peerage (1913).


3 B. Golding, ‘Gerard de Canville (d. 1214)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004); online edition October 2006 http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/4543 (viewed 18 February 2011)


4 The Battle Abbey Roll www.1066.co.nz/library/battle_abbey_roll1/ (viewed October 2010)


5 Richard de Camville, apparently the father of William Camville (see below), was a king’s justice who died in Italy in 1176 whilst escorting Henry II’s daughter to her Sicilian marriage: D. M. Stenton, English Justice between the Norman Conquest and the Great Charter (1965). Richard’s eldest son (i.e. William’s elder brother), also called Richard, was governor of Cyprus and took part in the Third Crusade. Another son, Gerald, was castellan of Lincoln castle and a supporter of King John against Richard I. (B. Burke, Extinct Peerage and Baronetage (1840), 106).


6 SHC II (1881), 97 [Staffordshire Pipe Rolls: reference to the Auxilium Vicecomitis (a tax on land) in which William de Camville is recorded as holding 8 hides in Clifton Camville in 1200].


7 R. A. Meeson, The Chantry Priest’s Room, St. Andrew’s Church, Clifton Campville – An archaeological watching brief (1997).


8 A. L. Poole, From Domesday Book to Magna Carta (1955), 432.


9 VCH Oxfordshire VI (1959), 243–51 (Middleton Stoney); online edition http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63743 (accessed 22 March 2011); VCH Somerset VII (1999), 84–93 (Charlton Horethorne); online edition http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=18740 (accessed 23 March 2011); VCH Warwickshire (1945), 26–31 (Arrow); online edition http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=56976 (accessed 23 March 2011).


10 D. M. Stenton, English Justice between the Norman Conquest and the Great Charter (1965); Burke, Extinct Peerage and Baronetage, 106.


11 J. Morris (ed.), Domesday Book: Staffordshire (Chichester: Phillimore, 1976)


12 Meeson, Chantry Priest’s Room.


13 SHC IV (part 1) (1883), 99–100 and 144–149 [Plea Rolls].


14 Burke, Extinct Peerage and Baronetage, 106 et seq.


15 Meeson, Chantry Priest’s Room.


16 Meeson, Chantry Priest’s Room.


17 J. Granvill and J. Burbidge, St Andrew’s Church, Clifton Campville, Staffordshire: Report on Phase 1 of the Investigation and Conservation of the Wall Paintings (1998).


18 HER, PRN Number 09499-MST5208 (St Andrew’s Church Clifton Campville, Listed Building no.: 1893/11/002).


19 M. Browne, Guidebook to St Andrew’s Church, Clifton Campville (1998).


20 S. Shaw, History and Antiquities of Staffordshire (1798).


21 E. W. Tristram, English Wall Paintings of the Fourteenth Century (1955), cited in Granvill and Burbidge, St Andrew’s Church.


22 SHC 1911, 300 [Inquisitions Post Mortem; ipm of 21 September 1308, referring to Geoffrey de Camville as having died].


23 HER, PRN Number 09499-MST5208; Granvill and Burbidge, St Andrew’s Church.


24 William, the 2nd Baron, was either son or grandson of Geoffrey (who had died by 1308, see above); the last mention of William living is in 1332: SHC X (1889), 104 [Subsidy Roll 1332/3].

25


 The date of the marriage can be deduced from when their children were born. Richard de Vernon had a son called William, who is believed to have been born before or during 1313: SHC 1911, 355 [Inquisitions Post Mortem; ipm of 3 Feb 1323]. The same document mentions William being ten years of age at that time. This IPM was occasioned by the death of ‘Richard, son of Richard de Vernon and Maud’. The IPM says that ‘William son of Richard de Vernon is his next heir’. This would suggest that the Richard who had died was older than William, which – if he was Maud Camville’s son - would mean he was probably born before or during 1312 which, in turn, implies that Richard de Vernon and Maud Camville were married before or during 1311. An article on the internet states that they married in 1309 or earlier, but no sources are cited to support this statement: newsgroups.derkeilor.com (viewed October 2010).


26 SHC 1911, 355 [Inquisitions Post Mortem; writ of diem clausit extremum, 3 Feb 1323, on the death of Richard de Vernon’s son (also called Richard), referring to William having given land to Maud and ‘the said Richard’, who could be Maud’s son or her husband. It also refers to William having handed over the land whilst he held the manor from Thomas Earl of Lancaster, who died in 1322].


27SHC VII (part 1) (1886), 230 [1327 Subsidy Roll]; SHC X (1889), 104 [1332 Subsidy Roll].


28 SHC 1911, 355 [Inquisitions Post Mortem; writ of diem clausit extremum, 3 Feb 1323].


29 C . Blair, European Armour c. 1066 to c. 1700 (1958), cited in Granvill and Burbidge, St Andrew’s Church.


30 P. A. Newton, ‘Schools of Glass Painting in the Midlands 1275–1430’ (unpublished PhD thesis, University of London, 1961), cited in Granvill and Burbidge, St Andrew’s Church.


31 E. W. Tristram, English Wall Paintings of the Fourteenth Century (1955), cited in Granvill and Burbidge, St Andrew’s Church.


32 HER, PRN Number 09499-MST5208.


33 Meeson, Chantry Priest’s Room.


34 SHC X (1889), 104 [1332 Subsidy Roll]. This is the last mention of William being alive; he died in 1337/8: SHC, 1917–1918, 82.


35 SHC 1911, 355 [Inquisitions Post Mortem: February 1323]; H. J. Pye, The Story of Clifton Campville in connection with the world at large (1892).

36


 SHC 1917–1918, 82; Pye, Story of Clifton Campville.


37 C. Rawcliffe, ‘Ralph Stafford, first earl of Stafford (1301–1372)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography; online edition May 2006, http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/26211 (viewed 18 February 2011).


38 Rawcliffe, ‘Ralph Stafford’.


39 R. A. Davies, ‘A Calendar of the Archdeaconry of Stafford from the register of Roger Northburgh, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, with some discussion of its contents’ (unpublished PhD thesis, University of Birmingham, 1986).


40 Davies, ‘Calendar of Archdeaconry of Stafford’; SHC new series X (part 2) (1907), 153 [The First Register of Bishop Robert de Stretton, 1358–1385].


41 Meeson, Chantry Priest’s Room.


42SHC new series VIII (1905), 111 [The Second Register of Bishop Robert de Stretton, 1360–1385].


43SHC new series VIII (1905), 112.


44 Meeson, Chantry Priest’s Room.


45 SHC new series VIII (1905), 113.


46 M. Browne, ‘St Andrew’s Church – Clifton Campville’ (2009); online version www.cliftoncampville.com/Church-detailMB.html (viewed October 2010).


47 SHC new series X (part 2) (1907), 107, 112, 120.


48Calendar of Patent Rolls Edward III 1367– 1370, 370 (grant of 4 February 1370).


49Notice in St Andrew’s Church, Clifton Campville, May 2010.


50Meeson, Chantry Priest’s Room.


51SHC new series X (part 2) (1907), 107, 112, 120; R. N. Swanson (ed.), ‘List of unbeneficed clergy in the Archdeaconry of Stafford in 1406’, in SHC 4th series XX (2004).


52 Meeson, Chantry Priest’s Room.


53 Personal observation, 25 March 2010.


54 1st edition Ordnance Survey map (1880s) indicates possible burgage plots surviving on each side of the eastern section of Main Street.


55 Meeson, Chantry Priest’s Room.


56 Meeson, Chantry Priest’s Room.



57 Meeson, Chantry Priest’s Room.


58 Meeson, Chantry Priest’s Room; Davies, ‘Calendar of the Archdeaconry of Stafford’.


59 R. H. Wyatt, Plan of Clifton Campville (1910) (copy in Staffordshire Record Office, D. 3825/6/1a).


60 M. Browne, Guidebook to St Andrew’s Church, Clifton Campville (1998).


61S. Shaw, History and Antiquities of Staffordshire (1798).


62 Browne, Guidebook to St Andrew’s Church..


63 A. Tuck, ‘Edmund Stafford (1344–1419)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography; online edition January 2008 http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/26201 (viewed 18 February 2011).


64Tuck, ‘Edmund Stafford’; SHC new series X (part 2) (1907), 153.


65 English Heritage Listed Buildings Report (February 1964) http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-272766-the-old-rectory-clifton-campville (viewed 21 February 2011)


66Tuck, ‘Edmund Stafford’.


67 Calendar of Patent Rolls Richard II 1396–1399; Calendar of Patent Rolls Richard II 1388–1392, 293 (a letter patent dated 16 August 1390 and issued at Clifton Campville).


68 Tuck, ‘Edmund Stafford’.

69


 Information board in St Andrew’s Church, Clifton Campville (May 2010).


70 R Hutchinson and N. J. Tringham, ‘A Medieval Rectory House at Clifton Campville’, Staffordshire Archaeological and Historical Society Transactions, XXXII (1992), 83–84.


71 English Heritage Listed Buildings Report (February 1964); http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-272766-the-old-rectory-clifton-campville


72L. Jewitt, ‘Haddon Hall’ (n.d.); online version www.archive.org:80/stream/haddonhall00jewiiala/haddonhall00jewiiala_djvn.txt (viewed October 2010).


73 Browne, Guidebook to St Andrew’s Church, Clifton Campville.





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