The church at Clifton Campville: lordship and community 12th and early 13th centuries


Figure 10: Hugh and Richard’s church: south transverse chapel and south aisle, showing join in masonry – 1338 to 1380



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Figure 10:

Hugh and Richard’s church: south transverse chapel and south aisle, showing join in masonry – 1338 to 1380
The south chapel is to the left and the south aisle is to the right. The break in the string course could suggest that the west wall of the chapel still existed after the construction of the aisle, and that it was removed only when the roof level was raised at a later date. This would mean that the south chapel was initially preserved as a separate space when the south aisle was built.

Photo © I M Curr



The new south aisle included a new entrance to the church. [see Fig. 11] This leads from an area where a ridge and furrow pattern still survives on the site of Clifton’s open fields.53 Perhaps the church’s south porch was intended to provide an entrance for the villagers, separate from that used by the lord. As the church porch was often the scene of ceremonies such as weddings and a place for conducting church business, it is possible that Richard and Hugh wished either to separate themselves from such events or to make access more convenient for the villagers.




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