The Bestiary Montague Rhodes James Originally published in History: The Quarterly Journal of the Historical Association New Series Vol. XVI april, 1931—January, 1932 Macmillan and Co., Limited London, 1932 Issue: No



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The Bestiary
Montague Rhodes James

Originally published in


History: The Quarterly Journal
of the Historical Association
New Series Vol. XVI

April, 1931—January, 1932


Macmillan and Co., Limited
London, 1932

Issue: No. 61, Vol. XVI, April, 1931, pages 1-11



Introduction to the Digital Edition
This text was prepared for digital publication by David Badke in September, 2003. It was scanned from the original text on an Epson Perfection 3200 Photo scanner and converted with OmniPage Pro 12.
Author: Montague Rhodes James (1862-1936) was born in Kent, where his father was curate. James studied at Eton, and then moved on to King's College, Cambridge. He became an assistant in Classical archaeology at Fitzwilliam museum and later lectured in divinity. He rose up the academic ladder at Kings College to Provost and then Vice-Chancellor of Cambridge University between 1913 and 1915. His academic areas of interest were apocryphal Biblical literature and mediaeval illuminated manuscripts. He edited several books on medieval manuscriptes for the Roxburghe Club, including, in 1928, Bestiary: Being A Reproduction in Full of Ms. Ii 4. 26 in the University Library, Cambridge, in which he set out for the first time the classification system of “families” of medieval bestiaries, a modified and extended version of which is still in use. His output of learned books was prodigious, and the ghost stories for which he is now chiefly known formed only a tiny part of his busy life.
Copyright: The original printed text by Montague Rhodes James (1892-1936) as published in History (The Quarterly Journal of the Historical Association), number 61, volume XVI, April 1931 is believed to be in the public domain under Canadian copyright law. It may or may not also be in the public domain under the copyright law of other countries, where its copyright status is less clear. If you believe that you have a legal claim on the original text, contact the editor of the digital edition at copyright@bestiary.ca with details of your claim. This digital edition is published in Canada and is copyright 2003 by David Badke. Permission is hereby granted for any noncommercial use, provided that this copyright notice is included on all copies; for commercial use, please contact the editor at the above email address.
Disclaimer: While every effort has been made to produce a digital edition that is accurate and equivalent in content to the original printed edition, the editor is not legally responsible for any errors or omissions. As with any information, use this edition with appropriate scholarly caution. If you discover errors in the text, please contact the editor at editor@bestiary.ca with details, so corrections can be made.
Formatting: The digital edition differs from the original printed text in layout and typeface, though all text has been included as printed; no editing has been done and all original spelling has been retained. The page breaks in this edition match those of the original edition almost exactly (one or two words are sometimes displaced to the next page), so the page numbering here matches that of the original printed article.
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The current version of this digital text edition

can be found at:


http://bestiary.ca/etexts/james1932/james1932.htm
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