The australian naval institute


Figure 5 TORRENS STUART PARRAMATTA VAMPIRE



Download 3.59 Mb.
Page16/73
Date28.01.2021
Size3.59 Mb.
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   73
Figure 5

TORRENS STUART PARRAMATTA VAMPIRE

VOYAGER TOBRUK

BARWON

BARCOO

GLENELG

BATAAN

BENGAL

MADRAS

CESSNOCK

KARANGI

WOLLONGONG

BENDIGO

GOULBURN

BATHURST

WARRAMUNGA

ARUNTA

WARREGO

PARAMATTA

SWAN

YARRA

0 6)

-d.6)

-(13) ■11 5)

-(2 8) (2.5)

12 81

(1 3|

(3 4)

(3 6)

(5 7)

|4 5|

(7 3)

COCKATOO DOCKS & ENGIN. CO. LTD.

VICKERS COCKATOO DOCKYARD PTY. LTD.

WARSHIP BUILDING

1934-1971 YEARS TO BUILD

FROM LAID DOWN TO COMPLETION


34 3B

40

45

50

55

60

65

70


It can be seen that pre World War II and during World War II. construction times at the yard were comparable with British yards lor ships of similar class The effects of lay-offs or non loading can be readily seen with the last 5 war ships buill by Vickers culminating in HMAS Torrens which was completed in 1971. The lead time for any new construction contemplated now would obviously be extremely long.

As Admiral Synnot quite rightly said, it is im­practicable for Australia to possess the tech­nology base which is necessary today for a mod­ern military equipment inventory Implicit in such a statement is the recognition that Australia will continue to source advanced technology and/or advanced military equipments from overseas suppliers.

So, where does Australian Industrial Support for the Defence function actually stand today and where is it going7

As a base-line reference, one could hardly do better than refer to the transcripts and submis­sions of the Parliamentary Suo-Committee form­ed to enquire into Industrial Support for Defence Needs and Allied Matters 1975-77 (Hamer Com­mittee) From the copious volume of evidence examined by this Committee some fairly stark conclusions were drawn viz:

The Committee takes the view how­ever, that whatever the level of (threat) probability, there should be national awareness of the substantial gaps that exist in our Defence Industrial capacity and the problems we could face if sud­denly forced by world events to be­come at least largely self-reliant or. in the extreme, self-sufficient. Such awareness is an important step to­wards the exercise of balanced judgement and the initiation of rea­soned action while there is still time to do so in an orderly manner.' The Committee went on to record problem areas in Defence — Industry relationships in com­munication particularly in forward planning and equipment procurement practices In discussing the role of industry in Defence R&D. the Com­mittee considered it extremely important that in­dustry be involved to the maximum extent feasible in design and development programmes because only in this way does it appear possible to sustain a fully effective defence support capability This point must be arguable, as it appears to ignore some fundamental Australian, Australian De­fence and Industry problems By opting for a bal­anced force structure concept, (once again I




Share with your friends:
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   73




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page