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Procedures:

  • You will be asked to participate in an interview regarding your experiences with acculturation and related stress factors. Your participation in this research is entirely voluntary. You maintain the right to decline to answer any question or end the session at any time during the interview. You will not be required to disclose any personal information regarding your identity or any information that makes you feel uncomfortable. If you agree to participate in this study, I will set up a time and place at your convenience. The interview will approximately last 30-45 minutes. If you feel uncomfortable signing the consent form with your full name, you have the option of initialing it. The interview will be audio taped, which you will be asked to give a verbal consent in the beginning of the interview as well.

  • Risks:

  • The study presents a minimal risk since recalling stressful experiences may elicit an emotional response. Should you experience any psychological discomfort, please contact





  • The Wellness and Recovery Center

  • (916) 485- 4175

  • 3815 Marconi Avenue, suit #1 Sacramento, CA 95821.

  • Monday 9:00-7:00 pm, Tuesday-Friday; 9:00- 6:00pm, and Saturday 10:00-6:00 pm.

  • Or

  • La Familia Counseling Center

  • (916) 452-3601

  • 5523 34th St., Sacramento, CA 95820

  • Monday -Friday: 9:00-6:00pm

  • The agencies require no payment for the service they provide.

  • Benefits:

  • Even though, you will not receive any compensation for participating in this study, it is hoped that your experience will serve an educational purpose in raising awareness to the unique experiences and struggles of black African Immigrants as well as help develop resources that enhances the well being of this population.

  • Confidentiality:

  • All information is confidential and every effort will be made to protect your information. Your responses on the audiotape will be kept confidential. Information you provide on the consent form and on the audiotape will be stored separately in a locked cabinet at the researcher’s home. The researcher or transcriptionist will transcribe all audiotapes. The transcriptionist will be given only the tape and no other identifying information. All written analysis will only use fictious names. The researcher’s thesis advisor will have access to the transcriptions for the duration of the project. The final research report will not include any identifying information. All of the data will be destroyed upon completion of the project (June 2010).

  • Compensation:

  • Participants will receive no compensation for their participation in this project.

  • Rights to withdraw:

  • If you decide to participate in this interview, you can withdraw at any point. During the interview you can elect not to answer any specific question.

  • I have read the descriptive information on the Research Participation consent form. I understand that my participation is completely voluntary. My signature indicates that I have received a copy of the Research Participation consent form and I agree to participate in the study.



  • I ____________________________________ agree to be audio taped.





  • ______________________________ ________________________

  • Signature of Participant Date





  • ______________________________ ________________________

  • Initial of Participant Date

  • If you have any question, you may contact me at

  • 213 327-7250

  • lb754@saclink.csus.edu

  • Or, if you need further information, you may contact my thesis advisor:

  • Maria Dinis, Ph.D., MSW

  • C/o California State University, Sacramento

  • 916-278-7161

  • dinis@csus.edu



























  • APPENDIX B

  • Interview Questions



  • For the purpose of this study, definition of :

  • Acculturation: the process of adaptation in a new country

  • Low acculturation: adherence to one's home cultural values and behaviors

  • High acculturation: assimilation to the host country and less retention of cultural values and practices

  • What it means to be a black African Immigrant?

  • 1. What are the challenges you faced when moving to the U.S.?

  • 2. What positive impacts (pride, and cultural retention) did race play in your acculturation process?

  • 3. What negative impacts (shame of one’s original culture, isolation, and assimilation) did race play in your acculturation process?

  • 4. How has race affected your employment opportunities?

  • 5. How has race affected your educational opportunities?

  • 6. How has race affected your housing opportunities?

  • 7. How has race affected your daily life?

  • 8. How has your relationship been like with African Americans?

  • 9. How have you been received within the African American community?

  • Acculturation, stress and its effect on the well being of African immigrants

  • 1. How would you describe your stress as a result of your experiences as a black African immigrant?

  • 2. How has stress affected your emotional health?

  • 3. How has stress affected your mental health?

  • 4. How has stress affected your relationship with others such as family members?

  • How low acculturation mediates stress

  • 1. What is the importance of low acculturation to you?

  • 2. Has low acculturation been a coping mechanism in offsetting stress? If so, how?

  • 3. How do you maintain low acculturation?

  • 4. How have you improved in terms of your overall welfare as a result of low acculturation?

  • 5. How have you improved in terms of your overall welfare as a result of high acculturation?

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