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Source 1

Title:

A Lost Decade.

Source:

Nation; 9/19/2011, Vol. 293 Issue 12, p3-3, 2/3p

Abstract:

The article discusses lessons learned from what is termed the "lost decade" since the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the U.S. In the author's view terrorism poses a political rather than military challenge to the U.S., and he suggests that America's best safeguards against terrorism are its traditions of religious and ethnic tolerance and its democratic institutions.


Source 2

Title:

Marketers tread carefully into Sept. 11 anniversary.

Authors:

STEINBERG, BRIAN

Source:

Advertising Age; 8/22/2011, Vol. 82 Issue 30, p1-25, 2p

Abstract:

The article examines how corporate marketing executives are dealing with the approaching 10th anniversary of the September 11, 2011 terrorist attacks in their advertising media planning. A trend is considered in which companies are presented television advertising in programs related to that event, including special programs commemorating it.


Source 3

Title:

9/11 Digitally Remastered? Internet Archives, Vernacular Memories and WhereWereYou.org.

Authors:

JARVIS, LEE

Source:

Journal of American Studies; Nov2011, Vol. 45 Issue 4, p793, 22p

Abstract:

This article explores competing efforts to make sense of the 9/11 attacks within entries posted on the “Where Were You … September 11th, Two Thousand One” Internet archive. Open to written contributions for one year from 15 September 2001, the archive amassed more than 2,500 responses, with posters writing from over twenty different countries. The article begins by arguing that this repository of vernacular memories has potential to significantly broaden our understanding of how the events of 9/11 were interpreted beyond the dominant discourses of political and other elites. It then attempts to do this via a discursive analysis of three key themes traversing contributions to WhereWereYou. These relate, first, to efforts to position 9/11 within particular temporal horizons; second, to accounts of 9/11's essence and causes; and third, to articulated hopes, fears, and expectations around the attacks' future impacts. The article concludes by locating WhereWereYou within debates over the archive's status in contemporary social and political life. It argues that this specific archive's refusal to foreclose 9/11's meaning renders WhereWereYou a particularly interesting memory project for exploring the events of 11 September 2001, and for thinking through contemporary mnemonic practices more broadly.

Source 4

Title:

What Remains to Be Done: The 9/11 Commission says significant shortcomings persist in national security.

Author:

Editorial Desk

Source:

New York Times; 9/4/2011, p10, 0p

Abstract:

The 9/11 Commission has issued a disturbingly mixed report on the progress made in national security in the 10 years since the terrorist attacks. It found considerable improvements but also grave shortcomings that could leave the nation vulnerable to new and ''likely successful attacks.'' These include: Congress's continuing ''dysfunction'' in its scattered, 100-plus-committee approach to security and intelligence oversight. In the last two years, assorted panels have received almost 4,000 briefings from homeland security officials. These competing fiefs have added to confusion, for example, by setting different security standards for cargo imported by air and by sea.



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