Socrates: You have to imagine, then, that there are two ruling powers, and that one of them is set over the intellectual world, the other over the visible. I do not say heaven, lest you should imagine that I am playing upon the name



Download 31 Kb.
Page1/6
Date16.05.2021
Size31 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6
Text of the Divided Line Analogy

From: Plato, The Republic, Book VI (Benjamin Jowett, Tr.)

Socrates: You have to imagine, then, that there are two ruling powers, and that one of them is set over the intellectual world, the other over the visible. I do not say heaven, lest you should imagine that I am playing upon the name. May I suppose that you have this distinction of the visible and intelligible fixed in your mind?

Glaucon: I have.

Socrates: Now take a line which has been cut into two unequal parts, and divide each of them again in the same proportion, and suppose the two main divisions to answer, one to the visible and the other to the intelligible, and then compare the subdivisions in respect of their clearness and want of clearness,

and you will find that the first section in the sphere of the visible consists of images. And by images I mean, in the first place, shadows, and in the second place, reflections in water and in solid, smooth and polished bodies and the like: Do you understand?






Share with your friends:
  1   2   3   4   5   6




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page