Societies of the world 34 fall, 2014 The Caribbean: Globalization, Socio-Economic Development and Cultural Adaptations Course Instructor



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SOCIETIES OF THE WORLD 34

FALL, 2014
The Caribbean:

Globalization, Socio-Economic Development and Cultural Adaptations
Course Instructor: Professor Orlando Patterson, Department of Sociology,

WJH 520, opatters@fas.harvard.edu


Head Teaching Fellow: Ethan A. Fosse, Department of Sociology, efosse@fas.harvard.edu
Location: Emerson 108
(1) COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES
In the broadest terms, our objective is to introduce students to the full range of Caribbean societies and cultures, then attempt to make historical and sociological sense of the region as a whole. We will examine common patterns of socio-economic and cultural adaptations beneath the outward diversity of the region. Following an introductory overview, Part 1 examines the historical sociology of the area. The second part of the course examines the range and variations of Caribbean societies through case studies of five countries–Puerto Rico, Cuba, Jamaica/Barbados(compared) and Haiti– and three major issues common to all societies of the region: migration and transnationalism; environmental disasters and disaster management; and tourism. In Part 3 we explore the cultural responses to, and expressions of, the social and historical context previously examined, through case studies of religion and music. A major theme will be the global context of Caribbean societies, and throughout the course we will use the region to illustrate the costs and benefits of globalization for Third World societies, especially ones under the all-powerful umbrella of America.

(2) SECTIONS
There will be approximately twelve weekly sections, the purpose of which will be to clarify the lectures and to discuss the assigned readings. Students are required to attend all sections.
The Harvard sectioning tool will be opened on Wednesday the 10th of September at noon and closed on Thursday the 11th of September at 5pm. Sectioning notices will be sent out on the morning of Friday, September 12th and sections will begin the week of September 15th.


(3) ASSIGNMENTS

  1. There will be:




    1. A mid-term, 1-hour online exam accounting for 20 percent of the final grade

    2. A final examination which will account for 30 percent of the final grade.

    3. Section participation which will account for 20 percent of the final grade.

    4. A final term paper of approximately 10-12 pages on a topic of your choice, accounting for 30 percent

The mid-term exam will be an on-line 1-hour exam which may be taken during any single hour of your choice on Friday, October 3. Once begun, however, you will be restricted to that hour.




  1. The final term paper will be due on Wednesday, December 10th at 12 noon.




  1. Recommended readings for each week are not required. They are provided for those interested in further reading on the subject such as preparing for the term paper.


(4) LIST OF LECTURE TOPICS
INTRODUCTION
WEEK 1: The Caribbean: Overview
(9/02) Introduction and Course Objectives.
(9/04) Defining the Caribbean
Readings:

[Note: There will be no section based on this week’s introduction, but you are urged to read the following:


Recommended:

Stephan Palmie and Francisco Scarano, The Caribbean: A History of the Region and its Peoples, Introduction and chapters 1-2.


Robert Potter et al, The Contemporary Caribbean, pp. 188-205.
PART ONE:

CARIBBEAN TRANSFORMATIONS, 1490 - 1940
WEEK 2: The Caribbean and the birth of the Atlantic World

(9/11) The first modern genocide: The indigenous populations and European conquest 1490–1630.
(9/13) The early imperial system: Pirates, plunder and the failure of white colonial settlement in the region: 1630 - 1700
Readings:

Barry Higman, A Concise History of the Caribbean, Chapters 2-3

Stephan Palmie Francisco Scarano, The Caribbean: A History of the Region and its Peoples, chapters 6, 9-12
Recommended:

Marcus Rediker, Villains of All Nations: Atlantic Pirates in the Golden Age, chapters 1-4 & 6.


Stephan Palmie Francisco Scarano, The Caribbean: A History of the Region and its Peoples, chapters 14-15
WEEK 3: Plantation Slavery
(9/16) Capitalism and plantation slavery.
(9/18) The social and cultural consequences of plantation slavery.
Readings:

Barry Higman, A Concise History of the Caribbean, chapter 4


Orlando Patterson, The Sociology of Slavery, chapters 2; pp. 145-158 & 165-181; chapter 9. (website)
Stephan Palmie Francisco Scarano, The Caribbean: A History of the Region and its Peoples, chapter 16

WEEK 4: The Non-Hispanic Caribbean in the Nineteenth Century

(9/23) Abolition and Post-Emancipation Society in the Non-Hispanic Caribbean.
(9/25) Indentured Labor and the Coming of Asians to the Caribbean.
Readings:

Barry Higman, A Concise History of the Caribbean, chapter 5


Stephan Palmie Francisco Scarano, The Caribbean: A History of the Region and its Peoples, chapters 19,20,23


Recommended:

Walton Look-Lai, Indentured Labor, Caribbean Sugar: Chinese and Indian Migrants to the British West Indies, 1838-1918 Chapters 1, 4, 5.




WEEK 5: The Hispanic Caribbean and the Rise of American Hegemony in the Region
(9/30) The Turn to the Plantation System in Cuba and Puerto Rico.
(10/2) The Rise of American Hegemony and its Consequences for the region.
Readings:

Stephan Palmie Francisco Scarano, The Caribbean: A History of the Region and its Peoples, chapters 22,24,25,28


Kal and Olga Wagenheim, The Puerto Ricans, 63-84;141-156
Recommended:

Martinez Vergne, “Politics and Society in the Spanish Caribbean during the Nineteenth

Century,” (website)

Mid-Term 1-Hour Online Examination: may be taken any single hour on Friday October 3.

PART TWO:

GLOBALIZATION, UNDERDEVELOPMENT & CARIBBEAN NATIONHOOD
A. Five Country Studies: Puerto Rico, Cuba, Jamaica/Barbados, Haiti
WEEK 6: Metropolitan Incorporation: The Puerto Rico Route
(10/7)
(10/09)
Readings:

Susan Collins, The Economy of Puerto Rico, chapter 1. (website)

Kal and Olga Wagenheim, The Puerto Ricans, 328-334; 360-382;402-420

Robert Potter et al, The Contemporary Caribbean, chapter 8.


Recommended:

Lizette Alvarez, “Economy and Crime Spur New Puerto Rican Exodus,” New York Times, Feb.8, 2014.


Nancy Morris, Puerto Rico: Culture, Politics, and Identity, chapters 1-4.

WEEK 7: Communist Dependency: The Cuban Route
(10/14)
(10/16)
Readings:

Aviva Chomsky, A History of the Cuban Revolution, chapters 1,2-4, 7-8

Richard Feinberg (Brookings Institution) The New Cuban Economy, chapters 1-2

Available at: http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/papers/2012/12/cuba%20economy%20feinberg/cuba%20economy%20feinberg%209.pdf


Recommended:

Damien Cave, “The Cuban Evolution,” New York Times, March 1, 2014


Roberto Zurbano, “For Blacks in Cuba, The Revolution Hasn’t Begun,” New York Times, March 23, 2013.
WEEK 8: Colonialism, Institutions and Economic Development: Jamaica and Barbados Compared
(10/21)
(10/23)
Readings:

Orlando Patterson, “Institutions, Colonialism & Economic Development: The Acemoglu-Johnson-Robinson Thesis in Light of the Caribbean Experience.” (Website)


Henry, Peter B & Conrad Miller. 2009. “Institutions vs Policies: A Tale of Two Islands.” American Economic Review 99:261-267.
Recommended:

Jorge Dominguez, The Caribbean Question: Why Has Liberal Democracy (Surprisingly) Flourished? (Website)


Anthony Harriott et al, Political Culture of Democracy in Jamaica and in the Americas, 2012 , xxx-xxxv; 13-35: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/lapop/jamaica/Jamaica_Country_Report_2012_W.pdf

Recommended Video: Life and Debt
WEEK 9. Haiti: Profile of a Failed State and Ineffective Foreign Aid
(10/28)
(10/30)
Readings:

Terry F. Buss & Adam Gardner, “Why Foreign Aid to Haiti Failed,” http://www.napawash.org/wp-content/uploads/2006/06-04.pdf


Marie Pace with Ketty Luzincourt, Haiti’s Fragile Peace: A Case Study of the Cumulative Impacts of Peace Practice (Course site) also available at: http://www.cdacollaborative.org/media/53210/Haitis-Fragile-Peace-A-Case-Study-of-the-Cumulative-Impacts-of-Peace-Practice.pdf
“2010 Haiti Earthquake,” Wikipedia article.
Recommended:

Mark Danner, “To Heal Haiti, Look to History, Not Nature,” New York Times Op-Ed, Jan. 21, 2010. (online)


B: Two Major Regional Issues
WEEK 10: Migration and Transnationalism
(11/04): The Latin States
(11/06): The Non-Latin states
Readings:

Peggy Levitt, “Salsa and Ketchup: Transnational Migrants Straddle Two Worlds”, Contexts, Vol. 3 #2(2004): pp. 20-26.


Jorge Duany, Blurred Borders: Transnational Migration Between the Hispanic Caribbean and the United States, chapters 1-3, 6, 8
Mary C. Waters, Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities, chapter 3. (website)
Recommended:

Kal and Olga Wagenheim, The Puerto Ricans, pp. 265-327


WEEK 11: The Caribbean Environment: Paradise and Natural Disasters
(11/11)Disasters and Disaster Management in the Caribbean
(11/13)Tourism: Uses and Abuses of the Caribbean Environment
Readings:

Polly Pattullo, Last Resorts: The Cost of Tourism in the Caribbean, chapters 1-5; 9


Robert Potter et al, The Contemporary Caribbean, chapters 4 &11
Recommended:

Tom Crowards, Comparative Vulnerability to Natural Disasters in the Caribbean,

Caribbean Development Bank, staff working paper # 1, 2000. http://www.caribank.org/titanweb/cdb/webcms.nsf/AllDoc/57B2613FA699CD970425741E0053A9E8/%24File/wkgppr_1_natural_disasters%5B1%5D.pdf
Catherine A. Palmer, “Tourism and Colonialism: The experience of the Bahamas,” Annals of Tourism Research, Volume 21, Issue 4, 1994, Pages 792-811 (website)

PART THREE: CULTURAL RESPONSES: RELIGION & MUSIC
WEEK 12: Two Afro- Caribbean Religions: Cuban Santeria and Jamaican Rastafarianism
(11/18)
(11/20)
Readings:

Margarite Olmos & L. Paravisini-Gebert, Creole Religions of the Caribbean, Intro, & chaps. 2,4 ,6


Recommended:

Stephen A. King, Reggae, Rastafari and the Rhetoric of Social Control


WEEK 13: The Music of the Caribbean: Latin Expressions

11/25)
Readings:

Peter Manuel, Caribbean Currents: Caribbean Music from Rumba to Reggae, chapters 1-4, 7

Norman Stolzoff, Wake the Town and Tell the People, chapters,1 & 8.
Wayne Marshall, “Mad Mad” Migration: Caribbean Circulation and the Movement of Jamaican Rhythm,” www.wayneandwax.com / wayne@wayneandwax.com
(11/27)THANKSGIVING
WEEK 14: Music of the Caribbean: Reggae: From Ska to Dancehall and Rap
(12/2) LAST DAY OF CLASS

Books Ordered at the Harvard COOP: These books are also all available at Lamont Library, along with other books for additional reading. The required selections from these books may also be on the course website.
Jorge Duany, Blurred Borders: Transnational Migration Between the Hispanic Caribbean and the United States

Aviva Chomsky, A History of the Cuban Revolution

Barry Higman, A Concise History of the Caribbean

Peter Manuel, Caribbean Currents: Caribbean Music from Rumba to Reggae.

Margarite Olmos & Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert, Creole Religions of the Caribbean

Stephan Palmie and Francisco Scarano, The Caribbean: A History of the Region and its



Peoples

Kal and Olga Wagenheim, The Puerto Ricans






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