So what? (Significance / Impact / Consequences)



Download 19.58 Kb.
Date28.04.2016
Size19.58 Kb.



BATTLE: Ypres


SO WHAT?

(Significance / Impact / Consequences)



WHEN: April, 1915



The Battle of Ypres was the first taste of trench warfare for Canadian troops. This was the first battle in which poison gas was used. Canadians suffered terrible losses.


WHERE: Ypres, Belgium



WHAT:
French and Canadian troops were defending Ypres when the Germans used chlorine gas against them.





OUTCOME:
The French and Canadian troops were forced to retreat and over 6,000 Canadians lost their lives.






BATTLE: Battle of the Somme


SO WHAT?

(Significance / Impact / Consequences)



WHEN: July, 1916




Casualties for both sides reached 1.25 million. When the battle ended five months after it began, only a few miles of land had been gained. The Newfoundland Regiment suffered 90% casualties. 23 Canadian men were executed because they would or could not return to the front.


WHERE: Somme, France




WHAT:
Allied commanders tried to end trench warfare with a large attack on the German trenches at the Somme.




OUTCOME:
The Germans were not driven back and over 20,000 Canadian soldiers were killed.





BATTLE: Vimy ridge


SO WHAT?

(Significance / Impact / Consequences)



WHEN: April, 1917





Vimy Ridge was the first time that Canadian units fought together as one, and this victory became a symbol of Canada’s independence. As a result of the victory, Canadian troops also became recognized as some of the best troops on the Western Front.


WHERE: Vimy Ridge (between France and Belgium)




WHAT:
The ridge had fallen to German soldiers in 1914. Canadian troops tried to regain the ridge after British and French troops had failed to effect a breakthrough.




OUTCOME:
The Canadians were successful, although 3,000 Canadians were killed and 7,000 were injured.





BATTLE: Passchendaele


SO WHAT?

(Significance / Impact / Consequences)



WHEN: October, 1917




The objection of the Canadian Commander, General Arthur Currie was overruled and his troops were forced into battle. Many Canadian soldiers lost their lives: only one in five survived. In the end, the battle proved futile as the Germans soon won back their land.


WHERE: Passchendale, Belgium




WHAT:
Canadian troops were asked to attack the Germans.



OUTCOME:
Canadians gained 7km of land and held their position until reinforcements arrived. However, the Germans soon gained back their lost land.



Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page