Should ncaa student Athletes be paid to play? Abstract



Download 27.2 Kb.
Page3/5
Date07.03.2021
Size27.2 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5
They are amateurs

People say that student athletes should not be paid to play because they are not professional athletes and not on a contract. It would be unfair to other students if the university paid athletes to play college sports, although many may disagree. In this article wrote by a regular college student “College athletes should not recive payment for playing” (Block 2013) Scholarships granted to student athletes cover tuition, fees, room, board and textbooks, according to the National Collegiate Athletic Association website. Some athletes receive scholarships that cover only a portion of these expenses, but many still receive exceedingly more aid than the average student. Let's be clear about the context within which this question usually arises. It usually does not come up at those NCAA Division I institutions that struggle to fund their athletic programs or in Division II or Division III. There is a misconception that athletic programs in general are profitable and institutions are making money hand-over-fist. The truth is that only a fraction of the programs are profitable while most operate at a cost to the institution. The question of pay arises primarily in reference to student-athletes in the sports of football and basketball at Division I institutions with high-profile, high-income athletics programs. The argument is that since such institutions receive millions of dollars from the performance, the student-athletes should be paid. Student-athletes are amateurs who choose to participate in intercollegiate athletics as a part of their educational experience, thus maintaining a distinction between student-athletes who participate in the collegiate model and professional athletes who are also students. They are there to get their education that and maybe have a career in their sport later on. In order to understand why we should not play college athletes in this article “Students are not professorial athletes” (Horace 2015) let’s be clear about the context within which this question usually arises. It usually does not come up at those NCAA Division I institutions that struggle to fund their athletic programs or in Division II or Division III. There is a misconception that athletic programs in general are profitable and institutions are making money hand-over-fist. The truth is that only a fraction of the programs are profitable while most operate at a cost to the institution. The question of pay arises primarily in reference to student-athletes in the sports of football and basketball at Division I institutions with high-profile, high-income athletics programs. The argument is that since such institutions receive millions of dollars from the performance, the student-athletes should be paid. Students are not professional athletes who are paid salaries and incentives for a career in sports. They are students receiving access to a college education through their participation in sports, for which they earn scholarships to pay tuition, fees, room and board, and other allowable expenses. Collegiate sports are not a career or profession. It is the students' vehicle to a higher education degree. This access is contingent upon continued enrollment, participation in the sport for which they received the scholarship, and academic eligibility.




Share with your friends:
1   2   3   4   5




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page