Sequence of Work Plan



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Sequence of Work Plan



Subject: History

Year group: 5

Coverage/focus: ANCIENT GREECE

Curriculum document links:

Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world.

Chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of world history.

Note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms.

Address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.

Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources.

Previous learning:

Used timelines previously in other history topics

Had history day previous year, discussed school topics so some knowledge

Family holidays


Resources:

Maps, European and world. Athens and Sparta information. Sorting cards. Diary entry task sheet. Pictures of pottery depicting war, soldiers and ships. Pottery template. Black felt tips/pencil crayons. Orange sugar paper for pottery templates.

Story of the battle of Marathon Greek and Persian stories. Photos and plans of Greek theatres. Outline of Greek masks. Pictures of Greeks masks depicting either tragedy or comedy. Plans of the Acropolis. Olympic Timetable . Information texts and packs providing information on the Olympic Games

Possible misconceptions:

Confusion between BC and AD, dates ‘reversed’. Difficulty understanding difference between county and empire Confusion between ‘ancient’ and ‘modern’ Greece, i.e. Greeks still wear Togas

Key Vocabulary:

climate, location, Greece, Athens, Sparta, rivals, Ancient, BC, AD, timeline, modern, slaves, citizens, opposition, pottery.

Session learning objectives

Success criteria (anticipated pupil progress)

Session plan

Differentiation


Key questions

To locate ancient and modern Greece on a map.
To identify the features of modern day Greece.



I can find ancient Greece on a map.

I can find Greece on a map.

I can describe what modern Greece is like.



Input- Explain history topic is ancient Greece. Brainstorm in groups what they know about modern day Greece and ancient Greece. Who has been to Greece? What was it like there? Show them example websites with examples of life in modern day Greece. What do they notice? It is mainland and islands. Hot and dry climate etc. Put the map of Europe on the whiteboard. Using the atlases can the children identify Greece, Athens, the Mediterranean, and the Atlantic etc? Got through with the class and fill in.

Main Activity- Using the guide books and travel brochures, the children compile a fact file of information for people visiting Greece.

Plenary- Share fact files. Hot seat the children as if the teacher is a tourist and they want to know about Greece for a forthcoming holiday.

Extension- Children can decorate and colour in their Ancient Greece front cover and stick it in their books.

Reinforcement

Design a poster top advertise modern day Greece using the brochures for pictures and ideas.
Extension

A booklet to describe modern day Greece, begin to list similarities and differences between ancient and modern

Where is Europe on the map?

Where is Greece?

What is different between modern and Ancient Greece on the map?

Is…earlier or later than…?

To place Ancient Greece in time in relation to other major periods of history.

To understand the main differences between Athens and Sparta.

I can put Ancient Greece on a time line.

I can name an event that happened before Ancient Greece

I can name an event that happened after ancient Greece.

I can explain why Athens and Sparta were different

Input – Discuss idea of city-states. What do we mean by a city? Look at Athens and Sparta on the map and discuss where in relation to the coast they are. How do they think their armies will work? Show the children the Athens and Sparta site on www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk Discuss the differences and record on the board.

Main Activity – Sort cards relating to Athens and Sparta and stick on the sheet to be stuck in their book.

Plenary – Make one statement each about Athens or Sparta without looking at the day’s research.
Extension- Create a diary entry for a person from Athens or Sparta to demonstrate their understanding of living in a city state.
Reinforcement

Sort Athens and Sparta cards and discuss with the class teacher. Why do they think they only had a few ships? Etc. Question them on their understanding.
Extension

Record the similarities and differences on worksheet.

What events happened before/after Ancient Greece?

How long before/after were they?

What is a city/state?

How are they different/similar?

How were Athens and Sparta different?

How were Athens and Sparta similar?

To infer information about Greek wars and warfare from illustrations and maps

I can use evidence to draw conclusions
I can look carefully at historical artefacts

I can draw an Ancient Greek soldier accurately

I can imagine what is was like to be an Ancient Greek soldier


Input- Referring to maps, discuss why the Greeks needed an army and a navy. Give children postcards or pictures of ancient Greek pottery, including some illustrating Greek soldiers fighting and ships. Discuss what information about Greek soldiers; weapons and ships can be gained from looking at the illustrations. Record the responses next to the pottery. Ask the children to look at the decoration on the pots and to select ones that show soldiers and ships. Discuss what made the men and weapons so powerful and if enemies are shown, how the Greek armour and weapons are different from those of the opposition. Which side had the better army?

Main Activity - Ask them to draw a detailed, labelled diagram of a Greek soldier showing his equipment, armour and weapons, and of a trireme (an ancient Greek warship). Discuss the armour the soldiers are wearing and the weapons they are carrying, and how the boats were powered, the number of rows of oars, and how the boats might have attacked enemies’ boats.
Plenary- Using the hot seating strategy, ask different children questions about what it was like to be in the Greek army or navy? Can they refer to their pottery for evidence?
Reinforcement

Provide children with simpler pottery illustrations for them to make their observations from

Extension

Children could research into some of the battles of Ancient Greece, and report back their findings to the rest of the class.

What can you see?
What does that tell us?
How do you know that…?
Where did you find the information to tell you that…?
What was it like to… How do you know?

To know the main characters and events of a key battle.

To know that the battle may be interpreted in different ways and why this is so.

To understand that modern events may have connections with the past.

I can discuss the main events and people involved in an important battle.

I know that different groups of people will understand things differently.

I know that things that happen today are linked to things that happened in history.

Input- Explain that you are going to tell the story of a battle that took place in Ancient Greece. Enlist children to act out parts of the story to make it more visual. Ask the children to think about how different people might have interpreted the battle and how much we can 'trust' the retellings. Ask the children to decide whether they think a Persian or a Greek recounted this event and give reasons for their thoughts.

Main Activity -Using a map of Greece, the children will need to locate Marathon and Athens. The children will need to complete a written account of the Battle of Marathon showing understanding of the perspective of either an Athenian or a Spartan on the battle. Can they explain why a marathon race is just over 26 miles long?
Plenary- Discuss the ways in which historians could be so sure about the details of the battle. What could their sources have been? How reliable are they?
Reinforcement

Using a sheet with the details of the battle on in the wrong order, the children are going to cut them up and order them in the correct order on the map sheet.


Extension

Look at the information of the battle of Marathon. Children who have completed their account of the battle can take on the role of the different characters and act out the sequence of events.

Who took place in…?

When did it happen?

Why did it happen?

What was it like when it happened?

Did everyone see it that way?

Was it good news for everyone?

Was it bad news for everyone?

Why was it good /bad for some and not others?

Does that happen today?

Why?

To deduce information about an aspect of the Greek way of life from pictures of buildings and texts.

To combine information from several sources

To learn about the role of the theatre in the way of life of the Greeks

I can use evidence to draw conclusions
I can look carefully at historical artefacts

I can use information from different sources to get a bigger picture.

I can discuss why theatre was important to Ancient Greeks

Input- Look at a photograph/ plan of a Greek theatre. Talk about the shape, acoustics, and presence of an altar, seating, the stage and how it was built in the open air. Ask the children to look at the plans of the Acropolis and locate the theatres. Ask them to use the plans and a range of texts to find out as much as possible about Greek theatres, eg the shape, how many people could attend a performance, the position of the stage. Draw their attention to the altar and emphasise that the theatre was part of religious festivals. Ask them to find out about the sort of plays the ancient Greeks went to see and whether slaves and citizens went to the theatre. Explain that Ancient Greek theatre originated from a festival held in honour of the God Dionysus. Introduce the different types of plays that were shown - tragedies and comedies. Talk about the elements of each. Ask children to suggest whether the Greek myths they know would be comedies or tragedies.

Main Activity- Children will design a mask for a character from a Greek myth, paying attention to whether they would be in a comedy or tragedy.
Plenary- Share the mask designs. Discuss what features/details make it clear the character is from a comedy or a tragedy.
Reinforcement

Provide with individual pictures of Greek tragedies or comedies for drawing and making their own masks.


Extension

Children to explain underneath their masks why what they have drawn is either a tragedy or comedy.

What can you see?
What does that tell us?
How do you know that…?
Where did you find the information to tell you that…?
What was it like to… How do you know?
Who went to the theatre?

Why?

Why was it important?

To deduce information about an aspect of the Greek way of life from pictures of buildings and texts.

To combine information from several sources

To learn about the role of the Olympic Games in the way of life of the Greeks

I can use evidence to draw conclusions
I can look carefully at historical artefacts

I can use information from different sources to get a bigger picture.

I can discuss why the Olympic Games were important to Ancient Greeks

Input -Recap on learning so far through the Ancient Greece topic. Ask the children to list the sources they used Tell the children they are going to show how much they can find out about the Olympic games using a range of different sources.


Give groups of children ‘information packs’ on the Olympic games and a set of statements about the games. Ask them to look for information on the buildings, the events and the purpose of the games, and use this information to select statements that describe the games, eg It was a time for all the city-states to come together. It was a competition when the city-states could show how strong they were. The Olympic games were a religious festival to worship Zeus. Women and slaves could not enter the games.
Main Activity- After looking at the information on the Ancient Olympic games. The children are going to complete a table of the games/ceremonies and people that took part in the games.
Plenary- Share what they have found out about the Olympics. Focus in on the activity from the AA pupils, can they share some of their contrasts with the modern Olympics?
Reinforcement

Cloze procedure activity on the Olympic games. Children to finish it off with an illustration underneath of the games had.


Extension

Children could complete a chart showing similarities and differences between the Ancient Greece Olympics and the Olympics of today.

What can you see?
What does that tell us?
How do you know that…?
Where did you find the information to tell you that…?
What was it like to… How do you know?
Who went to the games?

Why?

Why was it important?



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