School of International Relations Junior Honour Modules 2016-2017



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School of International Relations

Junior Honour Modules 2016-2017

(Subject to Revisions)

Semester 1:
IR3004 International Political Economy

Dr K Smith

Lecture Time: Monday 11-12

This module will begin with an outline of the three major traditions of international political economy: liberalism, Marxism and nationalism, providing an explanation of their main ideas, as well as a critique. After a brief examination of some more contemporary theories, the module will go on to examine the politics of international trade, including an overview of the GATT system, and some topical trade issues. The module will examine the importance of multinational corporations in the world trading system, and will then go on to look at relations between North and South. The module will finish with the importance of regional economic groupings, some thoughts on the future international economic regime.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3008 International Terrorism

Prof R English

Lecture Time: Thursday 12-1

This module examines the concept of terrorism; problems of definition; nature and characteristics and relationships to other forms of violence; typology; political objectives, strategies and motivations; underlying causes of rise and decline of terrorism; dilemmas of democratic and international response; aviation terrorism; terrorism and diplomacy; the problem of state sponsorship and support; problems of international co-operation, including the use of diplomacy, international law and organisation, and police and intelligence measures.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3022 International Relations and International Law

Dr M Peter

Lecture Time: Wednesday 11-12

This module revolves around several questions, "is international law really 'law'?"; "do international law and norms matter?"; and "what are the interactions between international relations and international law in practice?" The readings first examine the state-centered approach of traditional international relations scholarship and much of international legal scholarship, and then examine international relations scholarship regarding the influence of norms and the development of institutions, with an eye to the role of constructivist literature. The module will turn to particularly contentious issue-areas, such as the concept of legitimacy in the international system; the "emerging right to democratic governance"; humanitarian intervention; changing conceptions of sovereignty in light of human rights jurisprudence in regional courts; the role of the International Court of Justice and international tribunals; and the proliferating practice of international criminal law.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3024 The Politics of Africa

Prof I Taylor

Lecture Time: Monday 10-11

This module provides an introduction to the study of African politics. Contemporary Africa is complex and varied: the continent consists of around fifty states with very different histories, colonial experiences, economies, values, and social structures. The module reviews the social and historical context of contemporary political life, looking at the changes the continent has undergone since independence. It will examine and seek to understand the colonial legacy, the nature of the post-colonial state, society and its institutions, the nation-building projects and policies of these states and the movement towards democratisation and the continuation of authoritarian rule through "low intensity democracy".



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3026 Diplomacy and Conflict Intervention

Prof K Fierke

Lecture Time: Thursday 2-3

This module will explore the changing nature of diplomacy as it relates to conflict intervention, including the differences between the old and the new diplomacy and the range of governmental and non-governmental actors in conflict intervention, from encouraging and facilitating dialogue to economic sanctions to monitoring human rights, to peacekeeping and peace-enforcement, to forums for addressing past injustice. These forms of intervention will be critically analysed against the background of globalisation.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3030 Human Rights in Theory and Practice

Prof P Hayden

Lecture Time: Tuesday 12-1

This module introduces students to the complex debates concerning human rights, and in particular to the interrelationship between human rights in theory and in practice. While human rights is a powerful idea in our time, it is also the focus of numerous controversies. The module explores the philosophical foundations of universal human rights; the political, legal and historical development of modern human rights norms; issues and trends that have arisen since the advent of the United Nations human rights system; and the impact of human rights on the rules of international politics.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3041 International Political Theory

Prof A Lang

Lecture Time: Monday 2-3

This module introduces students to international political theory, or the use of ethical, political and legal theory to evaluate various international practices. Unlike IR theory, IPT is primarily normative in orientation, drawing on both the history of ideas and current political and ethical theory to give students tools for evaluating international affairs rather than simply explaining them. It addresses topics such as war, economics, environmental issues, law, and religion.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3042 Representations of Violent Conflicts: Research Seminar

Dr J McMullin

Seminar Times: Wednesday 11-1 OR Thursday 11-1 (module runs in 2 hour blocks. Students sign up for 1 block, not both)

The module interrogates the nature of violence and the representational dilemmas this creates for the researcher and for conflict analysis more generally. It explores competing and cross-disciplinary theoretical and methodological approaches to study violent conflict, and then applies these to specific case studies. Problems associated with researching conflict and violence will also be covered, including ethical considerations, challenges of field research, and problems of cross-cultural communication. Students will produce an original case study focused on a conflict site or issue of their choice. The module provides instruction on research and writing skills, and trains students to construct theoretical and methodological research frameworks that will augment their preparation for the IR Honours Dissertation.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam

IR3045 Violence in Deeply Divided Societies

Dr T Wilson

Lecture Time: Wednesday 10-11

Bloodshed is what tends to keep divided societies in the headlines: yet the nature of this violence often remains under-examined as a political force in its own right. This module seeks to explain what drives processes of violence in deeply divided societies with particular emphasis on what happens at the grassroots and between communities. The module combines theory with in-depth consideration of four case studies from across Europe and the Middle East, taking a longer-term view of conflict in Northern Ireland, Yugoslavia, Israel/Palestine and Iraq.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3046 Foreign Policy of Modern China

Dr C Ogden

Lecture Time: Monday 12-1

This module will provide an introduction to the major foreign policy issues and challenges facing the People's Republic of China in the post-cold war world. The primary focus will be on Beijing's evolving opening to the international system since 1949, from Maoist to post-Maoist and post-Dengist global linkages and cooperation. The module will also examine domestic actors in China's foreign policymaking, including the CCP and the People's Liberation Army, and the effects of China's economic development and reforms. Specific regional case studies will be discussed, including changing Sino-American relations and China's relations with the Asia-Pacific region.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam

IR3048 Peacekeeping and Humanitarian Intervention

Dr N MacQueen

Seminar Time: Tuesday 10-12 OR 1-3 (module runs in 2 hour blocks. Enrolled students sign up for 1 block not both).

The module is designed to offer students who have undertaken some previous study in the area of International Relations an introduction to the theories and concepts of international peacekeeping and armed humanitarian intervention. Although we explore peacekeeping as a phenomenon with a long historical lineage, we concentrate on its 'refinement' as an instrument of the United Nations in the period since 1945. The approach adopted is very much a political one - concerned with the international relations and diplomacy of conflict management. This is not a training course for conflict resolution on the ground, much less a military handbook



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3049 International History and International Relations

Prof A Williams

Lecture Time: Monday 11-12

The study of international relations (IR) requires that students have an understanding of at least some of the literature and examples that are commonly used by international historians (IH). This necessity is due to the obvious historical roots of many of today's pressing problems in IR. This module will take a number of key themes (initially and for example), war, peace and empire, that have been often separately explored by IR and IH scholars and show how the two disciplines can reinforce and deepen the understanding of what we broadly call the 'international'. A series of case studies will be used, initially (and for example) that of the origins of the conflict in Palestine/ Israel; that of the origins of the Balkan conflicts of the 1990s, and; that of the roots of the decline of the British Empire in the period before, during and after the First World War. Each student will be expected to undertake historical research based on a use of secondary sources and also a study based on the use of primary, even archival sources.



Assessment: 100% Coursework
IR3050 State Power Crime

Dr H Cameron

Lecture Time: Tuesday 10-11

This module introduces students to the challenging and thought-provoking approaches of critical criminology and their application to key national and transnational issues in the modern global world in relation to states, power, and crime. It aims to develop a critical understanding of the nature of the state; the scale and type of crimes committed by state agents and agencies; the definitional processes involved in state's labelling acts as criminal; and the forces which explain why and how states enter into deviant or 'criminal' practices and omissions. A range of state crimes will be explored in both the domestic and international spheres as well as specific case studies pertinent to the topics explored. Module content includes crimes against humanity, crimes against nature, state-corporate crime, trafficking in human beings and asylum policy as state crime.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3057 Armaments and International Relations

Dr M DeVore

Lecture Time: Friday 10-11

The goal of this course is to introduce students to academic debates and theoretical frameworks that give insights into the impact of armaments (their development, characteristics and proliferation) on international relations. As IR scholars have long recognized, the availability of modern armaments is a key determinant of the international distribution of power. Some have even gone so far as argue that the technological characteristics of armaments fundamentally determines the nature of the international state system. Meanwhile, certain policymakers and NGOs contend that arms dynamics (e.g. arms races and the spread of light weapons) contribute directly to the outbreak of wars. This course will equip students with the analytic tools needed to critically examine both these issues and others.

To accomplish this objective, the course will first (weeks 2-5) examine broad theories about how the development of distribution of armaments affects the international state system. Then, the course will focus (weeks 6-7) on the particular issue of whether the ‘excessive’ production and/or availability of armaments can cause wars. Finally, in the course’s three last sessions (weeks 8-10), we will examine how contemporary phenomena—the globalization and Europeanization of arms production—are shaping this particular domain. Ultimately, the understanding that students will gain through this course will enhance their development as political scientists and their ability to work in fields as diverse as: government, NGOs, international organizations, and the corporate sector.

Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3063 Organised Crime and Corruption

Dr A Kupatadze

Lecture Time: Wednesday 10-11

The module provides an overview of organised crime and corruption and its effects on the political, economic, and social development of countries around the world. It will discuss the increasingly global nature of transnational organised crime, its growing portfolio of illicit activities and its impact on regional and international security. The analysis will also address the complexities of criminal groups in different parts of the world and the policies to fight them.



Assessment: 60% Coursework; 40% Exam

IR3065 Refugees and International Relations

Dr N Saunders

Lecture Time: Monday 1-2

While discourses of globalisation posit a “post-national” or “borderless” world and the withering of the nation-state, this is arguably not a condition that the 1 in every 140 people globally who are displaced would recognise. Refugees and other forced migrants raise important questions for dominant understandings of that state, security, sovereignty, citizenship, humanitarianism, intervention, and international regimes, among many others, in International Relations. This module introduces some of the complex issues surrounding refugees and forced migration in global politics today. While oriented toward the role that refugees and the refugee problem play in international relations, the module is inter-disciplinary in nature, drawing on historical, legal, sociological, anthropological and philosophical works and debates. The primary goal of the module is for students to gain critical awareness of the role and nature of the refugee problem – as a legal, political and moral problem – in global politics. Students will gain an understanding of the history of the refugee problem, the practical functions and workings of the UN refugee system, the asylum process in the EU, and of emerging issues in refugee research.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam

IR3066 Emotional Encounters: Diplomacy, Power and Persuasion in World Politics

Dr T Shepperd

Lecture Time: Thursday 3-4

Diplomacy has long since been regarded as the cornerstone of international relations. In recognition of its importance in global affairs and the key themes of IR as a discipline this module has been designed to explore two of the most interesting and yet arguably under-investigated areas of IR: contemporary diplomatic practice and the role of emotions in political interaction. The module itself highlights the changing nature of diplomacy in the context of rapid developments in communication technology and enhanced globalisation, and how this has ‘opened up’ space for new agents and issues to enter into the diplomatic arena. It explores the manner in which public opinion, and indeed the role of ‘publics’, has come to be seen as increasingly key to effective diplomatic efforts. It also seeks to highlight and consider the role of emotional dynamics in diplomatic practices and general interactions as a means to offer a more complete and nuanced understanding of political interactions with a view to problemising why some diplomatic tools tend to prove more effective at achieving their goals than others. As diplomacy is also an form of action geared towards the communication with and persuasion of ‘others’, this module seeks to encourage students to think about and unpack the forms of persuasion being used.



Assessment: 100% Coursework

IR3067 The International Criminal Court in World Politics

Dr A Bower

Lecture Time: Tuesday 4-5

This module provides a detailed examination of the International Criminal Court, the first permanent global court charged with investigating and prosecuting the most serious international crimes. The ICC is both a legal institution composed of lawyers and judges and a political actor aiming to influence the behaviour of governments, militaries, and rebel groups. This complexity raises a number of practical challenges facing the Court. Who should face accountability for grave crimes? How can the pursuit of justice be reconciled with demands for peace and reconciliation, and when should one take precedence? And is criminal punishment even the most appropriate means of addressing grave violations of human rights? Through this module, students will gain a greater understanding of key features of international criminal law, the structure and status of the ICC, and will be challenged to apply their knowledge to contemporary problems facing the international criminal justice regime.



Assessment: 100% Coursework

IR3113 Gender and Generation

Prof A Watson

Lecture Time: Tuesday 3-4

The incorporation of issues of gender into the prevailing international relations discourse changes the way in which international relations is thought about, and theorised. This module will examine the meaning of such change, and will also argue that, in a similar way, incorporating children into the established discourse may mean that traditional themes and constructs such as states, sovereignty, political identity, agency, power, representation, etc. are transformed. This module includes an examination of such issues as the use of child soldiers; women and warfare; children’s economic role; and political theory as it relates to the family.


Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam

Semester 2:
IR3021 Case Studies in Conflict Analysis

Dr T Shepperd

Lecture Time: Monday 12-1

This module provides students with an opportunity to work on case studies in conflict analysis, in which they develop the skills required to analyse the roots, dynamics, key actors and issue-areas in specific conflicts. They will be introduced to the theoretical frameworks contained within conflict analysis about definitions of conflict, perceptions, historical interpretations, political, social, cultural and economic dynamics, initiation and escalation, and then will be asked to choose and investigate a particular case study according to the different analytical frameworks associated with conflict analysis. Problems associated with researching conflict and violence will also be tackled.


This will provide the basis for each student to engage in a detailed case study, chosen from a specific list of key cases.

Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3023 US Foreign Policy

Mr D Miles

Lecture Time: TBA

The module will be descriptive, explanatory, and evaluative. The first week of class will be devoted to a brief survey of theories of foreign policy, focusing on a range of positivist and post-positivist debates. From that point onwards, theoretical debates will be subsumed into the various historical, constitutional and structural descriptions of how US foreign policy is formulated and executed. Throughout the module we will also explore various normative critiques of the conduct of US foreign policy.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3029 Irregular Warfare

Dr S Scheipers

Lecture Time: Monday 11-12

The purpose of this module is to examine the dynamics of violence in three distinct forms of irregular armed conflict: civil wars, insurgencies and guerilla wars. Its starting point is that the twentieth century has witnessed a shift from traditional forms of warfare to these three distinct forms of irregular war and that this shift demands a reconsideration of the way that warfare is studied. Using theoretical approaches to the subject, as well as historical case studies, it will identify the dynamics of irregular warfare in the twentieth century, trace the diverse motivations and strategies implicit in different kinds of irregular warfare, and discuss the implications of this shift for those responsible for countering irregular warfare.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3032 Globalisation and its Disjunctures

Dr G Sanghera

Lecture Time: Thursday 10-11

Debates concerning globalisation have intensified since 9/11, the US-led intervention in Afghanistan and Iraq, the emergence of various Islamist groups that proclaim jthad, the proliferating security concerns around the world (particularly following the Madrid and London bombings), debates concerning the environment, and the rise of the new economic powers of China and India. Globalisation is a complex phenomenon that is defined in so many different ways that it is difficult to know what it means and to predict its potential utility. The literature on globalisation is diverse in terms of the specific approaches adopted and conclusions reached. There is no single theory of globalisation. Rather globalisation involves complex dialectical processes of homogenisation and differentiation, integration and fragmentation, and universalisation and particularlisation. The purpose of this module is to critically explore both the theory and practice of globalisation and its disjunctures in the contemporary world.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam

IR3044 Pathways of European State Formation

Dr J Murer

Lecture Time: Wednesday 11-12.30

The State is one of the most foundational units of analysis in International Relations, but where does it come from? This module explores the historical, and often violent, processes associated with the formation of the modern state in Europe, and the implications for the organisation of the economy and political society, as well as its impact for the larger development of the global political economy. Students will engage in how the creation of the state entails the parallel and commitment creation of categories into which bodies are designated, assigned, and condemned. The module begins with the transition from the mediaeval organisation of European society and concludes with an examination of the role of the state in facilitating and mediating the global economy.



Assessment: 100% Coursework

IR3053 Peace-building and Post Conflict Transition in Latin America

Dr R Brett

Lecture Time: Tuesday 12-1

The module presents a detailed introduction to the process of conflict transformation in Latin America since the Third Wave of democratisation in the region during the 1980s. The approach taken in the module will be to contrast the theory and practice of conflict transformation and peacebuilding and will include a primary focus on the role and intervention of the United Nations System. In this regard, analysis will centre on conventional forms of peace-keeping, peace-making and peacebuilding supported by the United Nations, as well as on more innovative initiatives, in particular in local-level peace-building. The module engages with and evaluates key theoretical frameworks relating to conflict, peacebuilding, the State, democratization and sovereignty and will be relevant to students interested in developing a career in public policy and policy-making in national and international institutions. We will evaluate the impact of regional United Nations interventions, which will include an innovative analysis that juxtaposes elite peacebuilding practices with local-level peacebuilding initiatives. The module will include conferences from UN functionaries.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam

IR3055 International Relations and the Internet

Dr G Ramsay

Lecture Time: Thursday 2-3

As a set of technologies, the Internet has played an enormous role in the development of trends which have been, in turn, transformative of international politics: globalisation, the emergence of new transnational political actors, the transformation of certain dynamics of war and conflict, and, potentially, in new revolutions and democratic transitions. Indeed, there is probably no area of contemporary international politics that has not, in some way, had to engage with the question of the transformative importance (or otherwise) of the Internet. Moreover, the Internet is itself governed by complex, contested, still remarkably ill-defined and sometimes unprecedented forms of global and international politics. The politics of the Internet– perhaps as much as the Internet itself– may be of great importance in shaping the way international relations works in the future. In this module, students will be offered an overview of this.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3056 Political Leadership: Theories and History

Dr G Slomp

Lecture Time: Tuesday 1-2

This module investigates the meaning, role, significance, value or ethics of political leadership in the western tradition. Its overall objective is to enable students to analyse and evaluate descriptive, historical, and normative arguments on the significance and function of political leaders in contemporary politics.

The module examines competing theories of leadership in their historical and intellectual contexts; it analyses’ leadership’ in relation to other political concepts such as sovereignty, democracy, rule of law, and patriarchy. The approach is theoretical and philosophical; examples of historical leaders (e.g. Mandela, Thatcher) will be used to highlight strengths and weaknesses of competing theories of leadership, and to emphasise their ideological assumptions and implications.

Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3058 Armed Forces, Societies and Governments: An International Perspective on Civil-Military Relationships

Dr M DeVore

Lecture Time: Friday 10-11

This module introduces students to academic debates about relations between governments and military organisations. Armed forces are both essential to states’ security, yet also pose a latent threat to governments. Indeed, many more governments are overthrown by military coups d’état than succumbed to foreign invasions. Consequently, governments in developing states face the challenge of ensuring themselves against the risk of military interventions in politics. While the menace of military interventions in politics hangs over developing states, even advanced industrial democracies face challenges in their civil-military relations. To shed light on these issues, we will first (weeks 1-2) examine the timeless questions of civil-military relations (through classic texts) as well as how the changing nature of military organizations over time. Then, we will focus (weeks 3-6) on debates about the impact of different modes of civil-military governance in developed states. Finally, in the four final sessions (weeks 7-10), we will examine civil-military relations in developing states, devoting particular attention to the causes and consequences of military coups d’état.)



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam

IR3060 Rebellion and Revolution

Dr K Harkness

Lecture Time: Thursday 1-2

The Middle East has recently experienced a wave of potentially transformative revolutions. With the hope for democracy, however, has also come the risk of widespread violence and destabilisation. This module takes an historic, comparative approach to understanding the causes and consequences of revolutions as important social phenomena that have been experienced across every region of the world. We begin with the French, Russian, and Chinese revolutions as cases that have deeply informed theories of revolution. We then analyse peasant rebellions in Southeast Asia and leftist revolutions in Latin America during the mid-twentieth century. Turning to the late 20th century, we examine the often nonviolent revolutions that led to the fall of communism in Eastern Europe and democratisation through constitutional conferences in sub-Saharan Africa. Finally, we return to the Arab Spring and its potential for lasting transformation.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam

IR3062 The United Nations since 1945

Dr Norrie MacQueen

Seminar Times: Tuesday 10-12 OR 1-3 (module runs in 2 hour blocks. Enrolled students sign up for 1 block not both)

This module is designed to place the United Nations in the broader perspective of contemporary international relations and to guide students towards an understanding of both the impact and the limitations of the UN in the post-1945 international system. The module considers the possible locations of the United Nations in the relevant theories of international behaviour (realism, liberalism etc.). In doing so, it explores the crucial interplay between state-level national interests and multilateral cooperation through global organisation, and the extent to which the United Nations can be considered a supranational as opposed to a strictly inter-governmental organisation. In pursuit of this the module explores the range of UN activities covering international law, development, the environment and global security.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3064 Critical Terrorism Studies

Dr C Gentry

Seminar Time: Monday 9-11 or Tuesday 9-11 (module runs in 2 hour blocks. Enrolled students sign up for 1 block not both)

This module will introduce students to the main concerns raised by Critical Terrorism Studies. Working within the Critical Security Studies tradition, Critical Terrorism Studies argue that mainstream Terrorism Studies has not been open to new challenges and perspectives. As such, Terrorism Studies problematically reifies particular sites and structures of power. Because of this perspective, Critical Terrorism Studies poses several challenges to Terrorism Studies about how terrorism is defined and limited to particular actors. Thus, this module will explore these challenges, which include state terrorism, the discourse of radicalization, and the role of emotion before turning to the intended outcome of Critical Terrorism Studies scholarship: emancipatory practices.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3069 Global Governance in Peace and Security

Dr M Peter

Lecture Time: Tuesday 10-11

Module description unavailable at this time

IR3102 Conflict in the Middle East

Dr Fiona McCallum

Lecture Time: Monday 10-11

This module centralises conflict within the Middle-East as a broad area of inquiry and investigates the political, economic and social conditions generating conflict both within and between states in the region. The subjects covered include the emergence and meaning of the “Nation-state” in the Middle East; the ideological relationship between Islam and Pan-Arabism; the latter and State-Nationalism; state civil society relations as well as inter-ethnic and gender-related conflicts. The module also covers all aspects of the Arab-Israeli conflict.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam

IR3109 Politics and State Formation in the Middle East



Prof R Hinnebusch

Lecture Time: Tuesday 2-3

This module examines the modern political history of the Middle East, concentrating on the period since 1945. It examines how the pre-modern historical heritage of the region, the impact of imperialism and the advance of modernisation have shaped contemporary politics. The module also examines contemporary political ideologies and movements, elites, the role of the military, authoritarian state structures, economic development policies, and the prospects of Islamization and democratisation. This is done through case studies mainly of Turkey, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Syria and, to a lesser extent, other countries.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3111 Asian Security

Dr P Lehr

Lecture Time: Tuesday 4-5

Establishing a security framework for Asia that will limit the risks of major war is one of the great challenges in contemporary international politics. This module will examine the evolution of security relations in Asia with special attention being given to South and East Asia and to the period since the end of the Cold War. It will consider the security cultures and policies of China, India and Japan, their relations with one another and with the United States, and the security 'architecture' that might emerge in Asia. It will also examine unresolved disputes over Taiwan and Kashmir, problems on the Korean peninsula, and the role of multilateral regimes and other international institutions.



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam
IR3302 Democracy and Revolution in North Africa

Dr F Volpi

Lecture Time: Monday 11-12

This module examines the causes and evolution of democracy and authoritarianism in North Africa in the post-colonial period. It aims to describe the structural and inter-subjective features of democratic and authoritarian change, and to locate them in vis-à-vis the evolution of regional politics and of the international system. It describes the specificities and dilemmas of authoritarian and democratic governance in each polity with a particular focus on the developments of the last decade (post -2001). It examines in details the relationship between the state and civil society – considering particularly the role of Islamism – within the larger context of processes of political and economic liberalisation as well as regional (north-south) integration.



Assessment: 55% Coursework; 45% Exam
IR4518 (dip up) Ethics and the Use of Force

Prof A Lang

Lecture time: Monday 2-3pm

This module will examine the ethics of using military force.  It will explore various ethical traditions that have framed war and violence over the centuries, and will then explore some specific topics.  The goal of the module is to provide students with tools for evaluating the use of force and violence used in various contexts



Assessment: 50% Coursework; 50% Exam.


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