School of historical, political and sociological studies economic miracles and financial crises: the far east since 1840



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SCHOOL OF HISTORICAL, POLITICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL STUDIES

ECONOMIC MIRACLES AND FINANCIAL CRISES: THE FAR EAST SINCE 1840




PROGRAMME FOR SEMESTER 2

The second semester outline follows the structure of the first. There will be weekly lectures on Mondays at 4 p.m. in Amory 402, and five weekly classes on Mondays at 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. in the second semester (March 1, 8, 15, April 26 and May 3). The following pages detail the lecture programme, the seminar workload and the seminar programme. The seminars will run as in semester 1, with a predetermined programme and with a web-site for you to post to and read from. The web address is http://ex.ac.uk/shipss/history/modules/hec2004.html and you are advised to use Internet Explorer rather than Netscape to access it.


We are continuing with the theme of trying to identify the forces that made the East Asian countries the most dynamic economies in the second half of the twentieth century, and the extent to which these same forces may also have contributed to the financial crises in the region at the end of the 1990s. As before, we are examining the way that the political, social and economic intertwine in the process frequently termed modernisation. If the central theme of the first semester was the reaction to imperialism (European and then Japanese), in the second semester we are concentrating on the developmental state (for a definition, look back to the reading surveyed in the first lecture of the first semester).
The work requirements for the second semester are exactly the same as for the first; you must attend all the seminars (or give me prior notification of absence), make the required contributions to the seminar work and complete an assessed essay to the requisite standard. There is also an examination in May-June that accounts for two-thirds of the final mark. The other one-third is formed by the better of your two assessed essays, providing that both have been submitted to an acceptable standard. The second essay, like the first, should be approximately 3,000 words in length, be fully footnoted, have a full bibliography and be submitted by the deadline. The History Department’s rules concerning penalties for late delivery can be found in the History Handbook. Please note that the assessed essays and the examination questions are designed to test two different skills. The assessed essays are broad in scope and are designed to probe your ability to marshal and manipulate a wide range of material. The examination questions will follow seminar topics more closely. I have revised the dummy examination paper slightly to accommodate the second semester’s programme more clearly, so please use this latest version to guide your revision.
Students who want advice on the second essay, or on any other aspect of teaching and learning for this module are strongly advised to talk to me. My office hours are Monday 3 to 4 and Tuesday 1 to 2, but I will be happy to fix an appointment outside of these hours by arrangement. My work telephone number 263296 and the e-mail address is A.E.Booth@ex.ac.uk.
Alan Booth

February 2004



ASSESSED ESSAY QUESTION

EITHER


Discuss the proposition that the East Asian financial and political crisis in the second half of 1997 caused more by fundamental weaknesses in the East Asian economy than by problems in the international financial system.
OR

Why did China escape the worst effects of the East Asian financial crises of late 1997?


As before, the word length is 2,700 (minimum) and 3,300 (maximum). The essays must be typed or word-processed, fully footnoted and have a full bibliography. TWO copies must be submitted with an essay cover sheet, according to the BART system. Again, these are designed as broad questions that can be answered in a variety of ways and have been selected as a test of technique. There are no correct answers to the questions but I am looking for your ability to gather, sort and present material to make a coherent argument while at the same time obeying the technical demands of sympathetic understanding of authors’ works, breadth of reading, coherence and originality of argument (that is, not slavishly following any single authority), and the presentational skills evident in footnotes, bibliography and English language skills.
DUMMY EXAMINATION PAPER
Answer ONE question from Part A and TWO from Part B in TWO Hours.

PART A


  1. How useful is Musui’s Story for understanding the position of the Samurai class in late Tokugawa Japan?

  2. To what extend does the deposition of Li Hsiu-ch’eng illustrate the motives and difficulties of the Taiping rebels?

  3. Why did early Meiji leaders urge compulsory military conscription? Illustrate your answer by reference to the opinion supplied by Yamagata Arimoto and others in 1872.

  4. Sun Yat-Sen’s memoirs indicate a penetrating analysis of the Qing Empire but little idea of what to put in its place. Discuss.

  5. The Fundamental Principles of National Policy of 1936 indicate Japan already preparing for war with the UK and USA. Discuss.

  6. The Central Cultural Revolution Group was determined to destroy the core of the Chinese state. Discuss with reference to the Documents of the CCP.

Part B

  1. Contrast the political and social structures of Japan and China in 1850.

  2. The Meiji Restoration brought to power conservative modernisers. Explain and discuss.

  3. Assess the economic and cultural impact of the West on either China or Japan in the second half of the 19th century.

  4. To what extent was the conflict between Japan and China during the 1930s driven by economic factors?

  5. The Great Leap Forward failed politically, socially and economically. Discuss.

  6. Assess the role of the Japanese state in its economic miracle.

  7. Why did China open its economy in the late 1970s?

  8. How would you account for the rapid growth of either Hong Kong or Singapore in the 1970s and 1980s?

  9. Why did the East Asian financial crisis take the world by surprise?



SEMESTER 2 LECTURE PROGRAMME


  1. The Pacific War and its Aftermath

  2. China under Mao

  3. Post-Mao Chinese political economy

  4. The US influence on Japan and the era of high growth

  5. The Japanese economy slows in the 1980s and the bubble bursts

  6. The island trading states, Hong Kong and Singapore

  7. Rapid growth in South Korea

  8. The World Bank on the East Asian Miracle

  9. The financial, political and economic crises of 1997, part I

  10. The financial, political and economic crises of 1997, part II

  11. Overview and revision.


SEMESTER 2 SEMINAR PROGRAMME


  1. How good was China’s economic performance under Mao?

  2. What were the foundations of China’s economic miracle after 1980?

  3. Did the developmental state bring both the economic miracle and the burst bubble economy to Japan?

  4. What were the foundations of the economic miracles of the Asian Tigers?

  5. Why did East Asia experience such a deep crisis at the very end of the twentieth century?



HEC 2004: ECONOMIC MIRACLES AND FINANCIAL CRISES































1.iii.04

8.iii.04

15.iii.04

26.iv.04

3.v.04










Maoist China

China >1976

Japan >1945

Asian Tigers

East Asian Crisis




Work Schedule for 10 a.m. Group




































Wendy ASHWORTH

A

F

Summary

E

C




Christian BOAS

B

G

A

F

D




Alasdair DOCHERTY

C

Intro

B

G

E




Natasha DODD

D

Summary

C

Intro

F




Ruaridh HASTINGS

E

A

D

Summary

G




Emiko TERAO

F

B

E

A

Summary




Erik STAHLBRANDT

G

C

F

B

Intro




Matthew STARTIN

Intro

D

G

C

A




Dominick TAYLOR

Summary

E

Intro

D

B




























Work Schedule for 11 a.m. Group




































Timothy ALLEN

A

F

Summary

E

C




Alexander DALY

B

G

A

F

D




Antonia LABIA

C

Intro

B

G

E




Henry LANG

D

Summary

C

Intro

F




Gustav MINTA

E

A

D

Summary

G




Paul NUTTALL

F

B

E

A

Summary




Helen REEKS

G

C

F

B

Intro




Thomas TAYLOR

Intro

D

G

C

A




Charles TIBBITTS

Summary

E

Intro

D

B

















































The module web site is: http://ex.ac.uk/shipss/history/modules/hec2004.html



























The designation A, B, C etc. implies that you should post to the web site summaries of the

Relevant material as set out in the reading list.





































The designation 'Intro', implies that you will need to read the posted material before the




Seminar and prepare to introduce the seminar, and chair the discussion.



























The designation 'Summary', implies that you will need to read the posted material before the

Seminar and be prepared to give a summary at the end and draw discussion together.




























Please keep posted summaries to text only, no more than 2 pages and try to save in rtf format.

























Information on how to post and read will be found at the site.

































READINGS FOR SEMINARS




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