Sample syllabus



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SAMPLE SYLLABUS

COMM 2050: MEDIA AND BROADCAST HISTORY
Course Description:

Media and Broadcast History is an overview of the institutional, technological, and social history of media and broadcasting. Starting with media of early civilization, students will study developments and trends throughout history that will culminate with media of the present. This course will reveal the major models of print, radio, television and the Web that have provided the foundation for communication in industry and society. The historical roles of content producers, broadcasters, and government regulators will be explored to provide students with a greater understanding of media today.


Text: COMMUNICATION IN HISTORY, 6th ed. Crowley/Heyer

Week

Ch.

Topic

1

1-4

Introduction / The Media of Early Civilization,

2

5-8

The Tradition of Western Literacy/lecture / 1st Writing Assignment issued

3

9-13

The Print Revolution / lecture /quiz

4

14-17

Test / Electricity Creates the Wired World / lecture

5

18-21

Image Technologies and the Emergence of Mass Society / 1st Writing Assignment due /quiz

6

22-24

Image Technologies and the Emergence of Mass Society

7




Midterm Exam / 2nd Writing Assignment Issued

8

25-30

Radio / lecture

9

31-33

Television / lecture/quiz

10

33-36

Television / lecture / writing assignment due / Presentation Assignment

11

37 & 38

Test / New Media,

12

39

The Internet / quiz

13

40

The Internet

14

41

Presentations / Screen & Critique Final Projects

15




Final Exam


Course Objectives: At the completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. Identify and describe the major stages of the development of the newspaper, especially in the United States of.America.

  2. Explain the significant events and people shaping the development of radio, television and The Web in America.

  3. Distinguish among the social, cultural and historical contexts in which radio and television operate in American society.

  4. Identify the main stages of development and evaluate the cultural impact of the film industry.

  5. Discuss and compare/contrast the landmark radio and television programs of the last 50 years.

  6. Explain how contemporary news broadcasting developed and predict how radio's and television's futures may develop.

  7. Explain how contemporary news broadcasting developed and predict how radio's and television's futures may develop.


Requirements:
Class attendance/participation, during critiques, group work, quizzes, exams and presentations.

This class consists of a series of lectures and multimedia presentations. ALL WRITTEN WORK SUBMITTED MUST BE TYPED.



NO LATE PAPERS OR PROJECTS WILL BE ACCEPTED FOR ANY REASON. All assigned work will be collected on the due date at the beginning of class (unless otherwise noted). This means if you forget your paper, you cannot hand it in later in the day. If you are sick and do not attend class, you cannot hand in the paper later. Any work that is not handed in on time will be recorded as a “0.”

Grading:

4 quizzes 5% each for a total of - 20%


Midterm exam - 20%
2 Writing Assignments – 10% each or a total of - 20%
Presentation Assignment - 15%
Final exam - 25%
You will also be evaluated on attendance, attitude, promptness, meeting deadlines, and demonstrating initiative. Points are given for demonstrating acceptable school and workplace behavior, completing assignments/projects, participating in group/class activities and demonstrating other areas stated above. Points are deducted for unacceptable behavior, absences, etc. Extra points may be added for superior participation or demonstration of specific competencies, etc.

Attendance:

If you will be missing class for any reason the instructors should be notified before class. You will be working in teams and members of your production team will be counting on your attendance and contribution to each production/assignment.

In the real world of work, you must meet deadlines. If you don’t, you simply lose your job. Deadlines are critically important in the field you have chosen to study: communications. Without deadlines, radio and TV programs would never get broadcast, and newspapers wouldn’t get printed on time.
English Department Attendance Policy

“Class attendance is vital to student success because it provides opportunities to enhance learning by interacting with fellow classmates and instructors. With this goal in mind, the English Department created its attendance policy. When students register for a course which meets on a specific day(s) and time, they are consenting to be on time and present. Faculty members follow the policy in an effort to treat everyone equally. Remember that absences should be used only if absolutely necessary for bereavement, serious illness, court appearances, and other unavoidable circumstances.”




Accommodations:
The Disability Services Office (DDS) provides support services and coordinates reasonable academic accommodations for students with documented disabilities under the ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Students are responsible for identifying themselves to the DDS office and submitting appropriate documentation in advance of the requested accommodation. For more information, contact DDS: (401) 825-2164 in Warwick, (401) 333-7329 in Lincoln, (401) 455-6064 in Providence and (401) 851-1650 in Newport..


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