Reference list: Albee, George W. (1) Reference Type: Book Section Record Number: 60 Author: Albee, George W. Year



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REFERENCE LIST:




Albee, George W. (1)
Reference Type: Book Section

Record Number: 60

Author: Albee, George W.

Year: 1967

Title: The relation of conceptual models to manpower needs

Editor: Cowan, E.L.; Garner, E.A.; ., M. Cox

Book Title: Emergent Approaches to Mental Health Problems

City: New York

Publisher: Appleton-Century-Crofts,

Short Title: The relation of conceptual models to manpower needs

Keywords: Rosenberg Influences

NVC Theory



Notes: Refereence from Rosenberg, Marshall B. "Community Psychology as Applied by a Clinician" in Social Change: Ideas and Applications. Vol. 1, no. 2, p. 3-4, January 1971


Alternatives to Violence Program (1)
Reference Type: Report

Record Number: 40

Author: Delahanty, Frances

Year: 2004

Title: Summary of Research on the Effectiveness of the Alternatives to Violence Project

Institution: Pace University

Type: Review

Short Title: Summary of Research on the Effectiveness of the Alternatives to Violence Project



Keywords: AVP

Alternatives to Violence Program



Notes: Includes references

URL: http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tcaruso/NVC%20Research%20Files/NVC%20in%20Prisons/Effectiveness%20of%20Alternatives%20to%20Violence%20Project.doc


Anger (2)
Reference Type: Personal Communication

Record Number: 41

Author: Leu, Lucy

Year: 2004

Title: Freedom Project-Quarterly Workshops

Recipient: Caruso, Thomas

Description: Word Document

Date: January 31

Type: Project Description

Short Title: Freedom Project-Quarterly Workshops

Keywords: Basics

Anger


Workshops

Training Description

Project Descriptions

Connecting

Reconciliation

Community



Notes: Prepared for NVC in Prisons proposal submitted to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Feb. 2004.

URL: http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tcaruso/NVC%20Research%20Files/NVC%20in%20Prisons/Freedom%20Project-Quarterly%20Workshops-Leu013104.doc

Reference Type: Personal Communication

Record Number: 42

Author: Leu, Lucy

Year: 2004

Title: Freedom Project-Weekly Practice Sessions

Recipient: Caruso, Thomas P.

Description: Word Document

Date: January 31

Type: Project Description

Short Title: Freedom Project-Weekly Practice Sessions

Keywords: Community

Anger


Return to Life Outside Prision

Self-awareness

Presence

Compassion



Notes: Provided as part of proposal to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention submitted in February 2004.

URL: http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tcaruso/NVC%20Research%20Files/NVC%20in%20Prisons/Freedom%20Project-Weekly%20Practice%20Sessions-Leu013104.doc


Appreciative Inquiry (2)
Reference Type: Book Section

Record Number: 72

Author: Ríos, Mauricio O.; Fisher, Scott D.

Year: 2003
Title: Appreciative Inquiry as a Tool for Conflict Resolution

Editor: al, Cynthia Sampson et

Book Title: Positive Approaches to Peacebuilding. A Resource for Innovators

City: Washington, D.C

Publisher: Pact Publications

Short Title: Appreciative Inquiry as a Tool for Conflict Resolution

Keywords: Appreciative Inquiry

Positive language



Notes: Notes by Francisco Gomes de Matos (fcgm@hotlink.com.br): An example of the use of AI as a tool for conflict transformation is given by Ríos and Fisher (2003), in which the authors explore how the positive features of AI might help bring about reconciliation between conflicting parties in the longstanding maritime conflict between Bolivia and Chile. In their conclusion, the two researchers say that "although AI applications in corporate and community settings have been successful in addressing complicated issues, scenarios of deep-rooted and longstanding conflict within or between countries can bring quite different challenges" ( p.247).


Reference Type: Book

Record Number: 71

Author: Whitney, Diana; Trosten-Bloom., Amanda

Year: 2003

Title: The Power of Appreciative Inquiry. A Practical Guide to Positive Change.

City: San Francisco

Publisher: Berrett-Kohler

Short Title: The Power of Appreciative Inquiry. A Practical Guide to Positive Change.

Keywords: Appreciative Inquiry

Positive language



Notes: Francisco Gomes de Matos (fcgm@hotlink.com.br): Appreciative Inquiry, a process for positive change, had its beginnings at Case Western Reserve University in 1985. It is being used by businesses, educational institutions, healthcare systems, governments and communities in the U.S. and abroad . As Whitney and Trosten-Bloom state: “AI is a bold invitation to be positive….Over and over people have told us that AI works, in part, because it gives people the Freedom to be Positive (2003:250). In a personal communication

(November 2,2005), Whitney clarifies that “The research into why AI works shows that its 4-D Cycle (Discovery, Dream, Design, Delivery) is effective as a change process for five reasons: one, it lets people meet and be known to each other in relationships rather than in roles; two, it enables people to be heard for what they value and care about;three it creates opportunities for people to share their dreams in a broader community of colleagues and friends; four, it fosters an environment in which people are able to choose how they want to contribute; and five, it builds systems and structures through which people are supported in taking risks to create and to innovate." According to Whitney (personal communication), “It is AI´s relational, narrative approach to the cooperative discovery of what matters to people that is at the heart of its success as a process for creating positive futures in human organizations and communities “. On other uses of AI Methodology, see Sampson et al (2003).




Assessment (5)
Reference Type: Thesis

Record Number: 53

Author: Blake, Susan M

Year: 2002

Title: A Step Toward Violence Prevention: Non-Violent Communication as Part of a College Curriculum

Academic Department: Department of Communication

City: Boca Raton, Florida

University: Florida Atlantic University

Number of Pages: 122

Advisor: Mulvaney, Becky

Thesis Type: Master of Arts

Short Title: A Step Toward Violence Prevention: Non-Violent Communication as Part of a College Curriculum

Keywords: Assessment

Training Description

NVC in Schools

Higher Education



Abstract: Structural hierarchies are deeply embedded in institutions such as our educational system. It can be argued that this type of model reinforces an aggressive worldview and fosters an atmosphere of violence. Teaching students to communicate compassionately should promote empathy, discourage verbal aggression and reinforce a more peaceful worldview. To accomplish this, educators need a means of replacing hegemony that assumes hierarchy and aggressive conflict are inevitable. Marshall Roaenberg's (200 1) Nonviolent Communicatrbn (NVC) may provide educators with an appropriate tool. Rosenberg's model counters the prevailing hegemany making it an ideal candidate to explore in relation to these issues. This paper examines the impact of adding an NVC workshop to two types of communication courses and whether Rosenberg's modd wauM be a u&ul addition to a college cumculurn.

URL: http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tcaruso/NVC%20Research%20Files/NVC%20Training%20Assessments/Blake2002-MAThesis.pdf

Link to PDF: http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tcaruso/NVC%20Research%20Files/NVC%20Training%20Assessments/Blake2002-MAThesis.pdf

Reference Type: Report

Record Number: 1

Author: Cunningham, Renie

Year: 2003

Title: Respectful Communication Training: Final Evaluation Report

Series Editor: Solutions, CEISS Research & IT



City: British Columbia, Canada

Institution: Employee Learning Services, British Columbia Public Service Agency

Pages: 1-84

Date: March 12

Type: Training Assessment

Short Title: Respectful Communication Training: Final Evaluation Report



Keywords: Assessment

Delivery


Effectiveness

Relevance

Introductory Workshop

Abstract: The purpose of this evaluation report is to present the results of the evaluation of the training program known as Respectful Communication, which is a series of training activities based on the Nonviolent Communication (NVC) process developed by Dr. Marshall Rosenberg. The intended outcomes of the training are to acquire and enhance the NVC skills, gain experience in using the skills to integrate them into regular communication behaviour, and enhance use of the skills in the workplace. If these outcomes are achieved, the training is expected to have the following impacts: enhanced ability to understand and respond effectively to others; enhanced ability to discover and help meet the needs of others; and enhanced ability to communicate intentions, ideas & feelings openly and directly. This evaluation addressed issues pertaining to training delivery, training effectiveness and relevance. Training delivery and training effectiveness were addressed using existing evaluation data that had been previously collected during the training sessions. Relevance was addressed by assessing the extent to which Respectful Communication training supports the BC public service visions and values statements, and addresses the core competencies of listening, understanding and responding; teamwork and cooperation; service orientation; and integrity.
This evaluation was not able to fully address all evaluation issues due to limitations in the available data. For instance, although information was collected from practice group participants on the extent to which the skills were used in the workplace, this information was not collected from participants of the three-day workshops, or the ten-day training components. This limits the ability to address the issue, as there is relevant data only for some sessions and not for others. In addition, the lack of comparable data for different types of sessions means that the effectiveness of the different methods of training could not be compared. Without comparable data from each session, we cannot determine if all methods are effective, whether there are differences in effectiveness between methods, or whether some combinations of training methods are more effective than others.

At the time of this evaluation, only about ten percent of the 600 plus individuals who attended the introductory workshop had taken additional training in this series. To get the full value from the training, it is expected that learners need to take at least one of the more intensive training components. Of the few who went on for additional training, many participated in two or even all of the other three components. Given that the majority of introductory workshop participants valued the training, felt it could be applied to the workplace and that they needed more practice, it is not clear why so few went on for further training. It is possible that barriers exist to accessing the additional training. Such barriers, if they exist, would limit the potential return on the investment made in the training, as the intended outcomes would not be expected from those who only participate in the introductory workshop.


The conclusions on relevance are based on what is plausible given the nature, content and intended learning outcomes of the Respectful Communication training. It is logically plausible that training beyond the introductory workshop could enhance the competencies of listening, understanding and responding; teamwork and cooperation; service orientation and integrity, and has some relevance to the vision and values of the BC public sector. There is no information on the extent to which these intended competencies were improved, either through a pre and post-test comparison, or through a direct assessment of the learners' competencies. Nor is there information to determine whether or not Respectful Communication training has had the intended impacts on communication effectiveness within the BC public service.
This evaluation was conducted to address the requirement that Respectful Communication training be evaluated prior to determining future funding. This evaluation provides some information needed to address the funding issue, but other factors should be considered, since there was limited data available to assess the impact of the training on the workplace and to assess the effectiveness of the different methods of delivery. The implications of the amount of training required, in terms of time off work, the extended period of time required before results can be expected in the workplace, and the cost of training employees beyond the introductory level, must be factored into the decision about whether or not Respectful Communication training is a cost effective way to meet the training needs that it is intended to address.

Notes: The report was prepared for the Public Service Employee Relations Commission (PSERC), Employee Learning Services for their information and use. The report was not published nor distributed outside of PSERC. Respectful Communication is no longer being delivered through the BC Public Service Agency. I trust this information will be helpful.

URL: http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tcaruso/NVC%20Research%20Files/NVC%20Training%20Assessments/RespComm%20Final%20Report/RespComm%20Final%20Report%20with%20appendixes.pdf

Author Address: Leadership & Learning Centre

BC Public Service Agency

Phone: 250-356-7202

Fax: 250-387-0749

Email: Renie.Cunningham@gems1.gov.bc.ca

Website: www.bcpublicservice.ca/learning

Mailing Address: PO Box 9404 Stn Prov Govt

Victoria BC V8W 9V1

Location: 3rd floor, 810 Blanshard

Victoria BC V8W 2H2



Reference Type: Edited Book

Record Number: 86

Editor: Dahlberg, Linda L.; Toal, Susan B; Swahn, Monica H.; Behrens, Christopher B.

Year: 2005

Title: Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes, Behaviors, and Influences Among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools

City: Atlanta, Georgia

Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control

Number of Pages: 366

Edition: 2nd.

Short Title: Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes, Behaviors, and Influences Among Youths: A Compendium of Assessment Tools

Keywords: Assessment

Survey


Notes: Excellent tool for identifying appropriate outcome measures for violence-related attitudes, behaviors and influences among youths

URL: http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/pub-res/measure.htm

Link to PDF: http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/pub-res/pdf/YV/YV_Compendium.pdf

Reference Type: Report

Record Number: 32

Author: Hart, Sura

Year: 2004

Title: Pacifica-NVC Pilot Project: January 2004-June 2005

City: Los Angeles, CA

Institution: Center for Nonviolent Communication

Date: January 13

Type: Project Proposal

Short Title: Pacifica-NVC Pilot Project: January 2004-June 2005



Keywords: Project Proposal

Assessment

Training Project

Notes: Ages 5-12

URL: http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tcaruso/NVC%20Research%20Files/NVC%20in%20Schools/Project%20Proposals/Pacifica%20Pilot%20Project/Proposal-Pacifica%20Project%20011304.doc

Reference Type: Personal Communication

Record Number: 81

Author: Little, Marion

Year: 2005

Title: Total Honesty/Total Heart: Facilitating Empathy development and Conflict Resolution Skills - A Curriculum Assessment

Recipient: Caruso, Thomas

City: Victoria, BC, Canada

Description: Survey Form

Date: November

Type: Survey Form

Short Title: Total Honesty/Total Heart: Facilitating Empathy development and Conflict Resolution Skills - A Curriculum Assessment

Keywords: Survey

Assessment

Empathy

Abstract: Sample questions assessing presentation and workshop effectiveness in developing empathy and transmitting conflict resolution skills.

Notes: Total Honesty/Total Heart curriculum and curriculum assessment developed and tested by Marion Little as part of Dispute Resolution Master’s research at the University of Victoria, Victoria BC Canada, 2005.

Author Address: giraffe_dance@yahoo.ca


Assessment Tool (1)
Reference Type: Personal Communication

Record Number: 36

Author: Kashtan, Inbal

Year: 2003

Title: Pre- and Post-NVC Parenting Workshop Assessment Questionaire

Recipient: Caruso, Thomas P.

Description: Questionaire

Date: December 31

Type: Assessment Tool

Short Title: Pre- and Post-NVC Parenting Workshop Assessment Questionaire

Keywords: NVC in Parenting

NVC Workshops



URL: http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tcaruso/NVC%20Research%20Files/NVC%20in%20Parenting/Assessment%20Tools/Assessment-Parenting-Kashtan.doc


AVP (1)
Reference Type: Report

Record Number: 40

Author: Delahanty, Frances

Year: 2004

Title: Summary of Research on the Effectiveness of the Alternatives to Violence Project

Institution: Pace University

Type: Review

Short Title: Summary of Research on the Effectiveness of the Alternatives to Violence Project



Keywords: AVP

Alternatives to Violence Program



Notes: Includes references

URL: http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tcaruso/NVC%20Research%20Files/NVC%20in%20Prisons/Effectiveness%20of%20Alternatives%20to%20Violence%20Project.doc


Azevedo, Milton M. (1)
Reference Type: Book

Record Number: 75

Author: Azevedo, Milton M.

Year: 2004

Title: Portuguese. A Linguistic Introduction.

City: Cambridge, UK

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Short Title: Portuguese. A Linguistic Introduction.

Keywords: Constructive Communication

Positive language



Notes: Notes by Francisco Gomes de Matos (fcgm@hotlink.com.br): A more recent, brief appraisal in English, of the Constructive Communication approach can be found in a linguistic introduction to Portuguese, by Berkeley linguist Azevedo (2004: 290):”Research on negative language has led some scholars to make a case for intentional use of positive language as a strategy to improve communication, and ultimately, one would hope, human relations (Gomes de Matos,1996, 2002). Whether such efforts can be effective as a tool for social change is an open empirical question”.


Baran, Gary (3)
Reference Type: Personal Communication

Record Number: 19

Author: Baran, Gary

Year: 2000

Title: International Intensive Training Evaluation Summary

Recipient: Board, CNVC; Rosenberg, Marshall

Description: Results from the evaluation we recently did, in which we solicited feedback from everyone who has attended an IIT.

Date: September 8

Type: Survey Report

Short Title: International Intensive Training Evaluation Summary

Keywords: Survey

Project Report



URL: http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tcaruso/NVC%20Research%20Files/NVC%20Training%20Assessments/IIT%20Assessment/Survey%20Report-IIT%20Assessment.doc

Reference Type: Journal Article

Record Number: 47

Author: Baran, Gary

Year: 2000

Title: Nonviolent Communication: An Important Component in Personal and Nonviolent Social Change

Journal: The Acorn (Journal of the Gandhi-King Society)

Volume: 10

Issue: 2

Pages: 42-48

Date: Spring

Short Title: Nonviolent Communication: An Important Component in Personal and Nonviolent Social Change

Notes: Gary Baran has copies

URL: http://filebox.vt.edu/users/tcaruso/NVC%20Research%20Files/NVC%20Usage/Baran2000-TheAcorn.pdf

Author Address: gbaran@cnvc.org

Reference Type: Journal Article

Record Number: 46

Author: Baran, Gary

Year: 1998

Title: Speaking Giraffe Language

Journal: Peace Review

Volume: 10

Issue: 4

Pages: 533-538

Short Title: Speaking Giraffe Language

Keywords: Linguistic violence

Giraffe language



Abstract: Linguistic violence is violence in the use of language. That would include what we say and how we say it, and its implications. Lying or other misleading language, slander, and malicious gossip could be viewed as linquistic violence. They often do violence to the social fabric, undermine trust, and cause harm in various ways. Shouting into someone's face (especially in situations in which this could predictably escalate into physical violence), name calling, and not allowing others a fair opportunity to be heard could also be regarded as linguistic violence. Some linguistic violence of this sort is obviously intentional, but much linquistic violence is merely habitual and may even seem innocuous. What follows will focus on forms of linquistic violence that are often not seen as such, and on alternatives to such linguistic violence.

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