Red Bank Catholic High School


All courses and levels require completion of summer reading lists!



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All courses and levels require completion of summer reading lists!

STUDY SKILLS (ACP) Grade 9

(quarter course)

This course develops and reinforces study and organizational skills. These skills are implemented in class and assist the students in achieving success in all content areas. The course promotes student advocacy and student responsibility.

INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING (ACP) Grades 9, 10

(quarter course)

This workshop-style course emphasizes students’ creative writing skills, specifically in the genres of poetry, short story, short drama, and prose (Journaling will also be incorporated into the quarter). Students will read a variety of selections from these genres and then craft their own writings. They will share their writing in class, as well as provide and receive constructive feedback during a number of peer-review sessions. Students will strengthen their writing ability by practicing proper ELA conventions, and they will foster their proofreading, editing, and revision skills. Students will also be introduced to the idea of publishing their writing. Course requires a final portfolio.

SAT/PSAT VERBAL PREP (ACP) Grade 10

(quarter course)

This SAT/PSAT prep course is designed to help students prepare for the rigors of taking the Verbal section of these standardized tests. The course will focus on the following areas: writing a formal essay, including thesis statement, topic sentences, paragraph development, and supporting examples; vocabulary sentence completion; grammar conventions; sentence corrections; and critical reading consumption, in order to improve vocabulary and comprehension skill.

MOCK TRIAL: A STUDY IN JURISPRUDENCE and DEBATE (ACP) Grades 9, 10 (quarter course)

Grades 11, 12 (semester course)

“We the people, in order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice ...” Mock courtroom drama will commence as students become the players in an array of simulated trials that demonstrate how our legal system works. The structure of our court system, the functions of judge and jury, and basic trial procedures and strategies that attorneys employ will be analyzed and studied. The students will work on communication skills to argue controversial topics effectively. Different forms of debate will be explored as students learn how to put forth a stance on an issue in a logical, well-spoken manner through orderly discourse; from the persuasive speech, to various debate styles, and proposing bills in a Student Congress setting.



ENGLISH I (Honors and ACP) Grade 9

Placement determined by diocesan placement test, previous standardized testing and 6, 7, 8 grade record.

For the first semester, this course will focus on the writing process and fundamental skills in reading comprehension and grammar. Literature is presented in the format of the five genres: short story, nonfiction, novel, drama and poetry. Composition and vocabulary development are correlated with the study of literature. The composition program is designed to be sequential, stressing at this level sentence structures, the topic sentence and paragraph patterns. The students will also review the rules and uses of correct grammar. The honors English course on this level provides more time for the discussion of literary devices and the writing of longer expository essays.

ENGLISH 1 (CP) Grade 9

This course presents extensive work in basic skills, together with literary genres, composition and vocabulary. Various short stories, brief nonfiction selections, poetry, mythology, selected short plays, and review of the fundamentals of grammar will also be incorporated.



AMERICAN LITERATURE (HONORS and ACP) Grade 10

Prerequisite: Honors: “B-” average in Honors English I; “A” average in an accelerated college prep English course with a recommendation from student’s current English teacher.

This course presents a survey of American literature combined with intensive instruction in the skills required to read and write effectively. The course will stress critical writing and the personal essay, which will be correlated with the study of literature. Grammar, spelling and vocabulary development will be included in the course. Written papers will be required. Honors students will be expected to make critical appraisals of literary works, analyze the strengths and weaknesses of various authors, and demonstrate how the literature studied reflects the moral, social and historical context of the time.

AMERICAN LITERATURE (CP) Grade 10

This course reinforces fundamental skills in reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. Writing skills ranging from effective sentence structure to proper paragraphing are also stressed. Once these fundamentals have been sufficiently grasped and reviewed, students will commence study of the literature textbook, which offers a survey of relevant works coupled with related literary terms and vocabulary. In addition to reading selections from the anthology, students will read three novels. From these novels students will draw on themes, conflicts, and characterization in order to produce various writings. The progress of the students will dictate the pace of the class.



MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS (HONORS, ACP, and CP) Grade 11

Prerequisite: Honors: “B-” average in Honors American Literature; “A” average in accelerated college prep American Literature course with a recommendation from student’s current English teacher.

This course presents a survey of English literature from the earliest recorded works through works of the Victorian Age. Work in vocabulary is correlated with the study of literature. Students learn the techniques of critical analysis which are expressed in expository writing. They will explore more extensively the tools of literary research and will write a research paper. In addition to the traditional method of testing for evaluation of progress, several alternative assessment procedures will be used throughout the year for evaluation.

LITERATURE and MEDIA STUDIES (ACP) Grade 12

This course will educate students in the areas of journalism, media studies, theater and the modern novel. In journalism, students will learn to read, interpret and write various types of newspaper stories and to evaluate what they have written. Media studies will include global mass communications, basic rights in print and speech, advertising and public relations, television and film. In film, students will learn the mechanics of the field, see movies and constructively analyze them in writing. Students will analyze contemporary novels, write a research paper and continue to develop vocabulary skills.



SPEECH and DRAMATIC LITERATURE (ACP) Grade 12

The first half of this course, designed to prepare students for the future, consists of general communication theories, public speaking, vocal and physical delivery techniques, and interview procedures. Students will research, write and organize demonstrative, informative and persuasive speeches. The second half of the course emphasizes oral interpretation of literature and of theater as a performing art. It covers the fundamentals of acting and play production with the emphasis on the “living theater” as well as on the study of dramatic literature. Evaluative criteria will include tests, group projects, class participation, literary analyses, oral presentations, monologues, and scene work.



ANALYSIS of DETECTIVE FICTION (ACP) Grade 12

This course will examine the development of detective fiction from Edgar Allan Poe and Sherlock Holmes in the nineteenth century to the present day. Students will begin with Poe’s Gold Bug and Murders in the Rue Morgue and move to Conan Doyle’s Hound of the Baskervilles and the emergence of Sherlock Holmes in the shorter stories.

In the 20th century, emphasis will be placed on the classic American works of Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler, as well as Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers, and move to a sample of contemporary authors such as Sara Paretsky, P.D. James, and Dick Francis. Students will write a research paper during the third quarter.

SHAKESPEARE: THE LIVING WILL (ACP) Grade 12

Prerequisite: “B” average in ACP Major British Writers or “C” average in Honors Major British Writers

This course will allow students a more comprehensive experience with Shakespeare, nurture or create a love for his works, eliminate students’ fear of Shakespeare, and engage then in activities that will spark creativity and a love of learning. By using an innovative approach the students will cover, discuss, analyze and perform scenes from six Shakespearean plays: two comedies, tragedies and histories each. Students will be required to call on their creative sides to bring Shakespeare’s works to life through acting, debates, games, and projects as well as to draw on the themes, conflicts and characterization to create various analytical writings.

THE WRITING PROCESS (ACP) dual enrollment course Grades 11, 12

(semester course)

The overall approach to this course is a workshop approach, in which students read and respond to texts, including student essays. Students will use computers to compose and review essays in class. They will be encouraged to explore and individualize their written process, as they learn to read critically, respond logically and apply strategies for effective composing and revising.

INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (ACP) dual enrollment course Grade 12

(semester course)

Prerequisite: Students in CP Major British Writers must have a minimum of an “A-“ and a recommendation from their current English teacher; B in ACP Major British Writers; C in Honors Major British Writers.

This course provides an overview of literature both for those who love to read and for those who have been intimidated by other literature courses. Students will learn the terminology of the four major literary genres (poetry, drama, short story, and novel). They will study the literary movements that have shaped these genres from the Classicism of Aristotle to the Anti-Realism of MTV. Students will learn to answer essay questions effectively, write papers for literature courses, and how to study literature more efficiently and effectively.



THE SHORT STORY (ACP) dual enrollment course Grade 12

(semester course)

Prerequisite: Students in CP Major British Writers must have a minimum of an “A-“ and a recommendation from their current English teacher; B in ACP Major British Writers; C in Honors Major British Writers.

This course will explore the short story as a literary form. Stories will be examined from analytical, social, psychological, historical, political, racial, gender, and artistic perspectives. Throughout the semester, students will improve their skills in discussing and writing about their insights about the stories.



HONORS WORLD LITERATURE and the FINE ARTS Grade 12

Prerequisite: “B” average in ACP Major British Writers or “C” average in Honors Major British Writers

The course, taught by members of the English and Art Music Departments, sketches the history of man through a study of great literature and art. Selected readings from great literary works from the Bible through contemporary literature are discussed in the light of the development of the fine arts. Critical and informative research papers and reports are required. The course also includes required field trips to enhance the student’s awareness of the interrelationship between literature and the fine arts.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH dual enrollment course Grade 12

Prerequisite: Students must have a minimum of a “B+” in Honors Major British Writers and a recommendation from their current English teacher.



See page 7 for information on the AP application process.

The AP College Board test is mandatory.

The course is directed toward the superior student whose achievement in English is comparable to that of better college students. The content combines the study and practice of writing with intensive examination of works of the major literary genres. The student is expected to conduct a sustained discussion based on an accurate reading and valid interpretation of the literature studied. Research papers and analytical essays are required. In addition to literature and composition studies, speech and vocabulary activities are interwoven throughout the course.



COURSES AVAILABLE BY GRADE LEVEL

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 9

Leadership (ACP) (quarter course)

U.S. History I (CP and ACP)

Honors U.S. History I



Grade 10

U.S. History I and II (CP and ACP)

Honors U.S. History I and II

A.P. American History

Grade 11
U.S. History I and II (CP and ACP)

Honors U.S. History I and II

World History (CP and ACP)

Honors World History

***A.P. World History

Principles of Psychology I (ACP) (semester course)

Principles of Psychology II (ACP) semester course)

Sociology (ACP) (semester course)


Grade 12
U.S. History II (CP and ACP)

Honors U.S. History II

World History (CP and ACP)

Honors World History

***A.P. World History

A.P. American History

***A.P. American Government and Politics

American Government and Politics (ACP) (semester course)

History and Media (ACP) (semester course)

Contemporary Global Issues (ACP)

Honors Twentieth Century History

Principles of Psychology I (ACP) (semester course)

Principles of Psychology II (ACP) (semester course)

Criminology and Law (ACP)

Sociology (ACP) (semester course)

***dual enrollment course



HISTORY and SOCIAL SCIENCE

LEADERSHIP (ACP) Grade 9

(quarter course)

The Thomas G. Labrecque Leadership Institute of Red Bank Catholic High School will provide a leadership experience for students to prepare them for the challenges they will encounter on their professional and personal life journey.

The course addresses leadership as it relates to ethics, problem solving, critical thinking, and communication skills. It will help students develop a responsibility as citizens of our community, the United States, and the world.



U. S. HISTORY I (ACP) Grades 9, 10, 11

The United States History I course is a condensed study beginning with the period of colonization and chronologically covers history to the Spanish American War. The students will study in depth the Revolutionary War, the Constitution, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Gilded Age, and Industrialization. They will explore historical events from a political, social and economic perspective. Students are given a refresher course in essential geography to ascertain that they are able to place historical events in a global context.



U. S. HISTORY I (CP) Grades 9, 10, 11

The United States History I course is a condensed study which begins with the period of colonization and chronologically covers up to the period of Industrialization. The course focuses on historical events from a political, social and economic perspective. Students will also study geography and how it impacts events in history. This course will also focus on the basic skills needed to be successful, such as study techniques, note-taking skills, and writing.



HONORS U. S. HISTORY I Grades 9, 10, 11

Prerequisite: Students entering Honors United States History I are selected on the basis of their grade school records and a writing test may be required.

Students entering the honors level United States History I course will be provided an opportunity to experience an in-depth study of the key events in American history from the colonial period to the late 1890s. This will be achieved through simulation games, reading of primary sources and analytical essays.

U. S. HISTORY II (ACP) Grades 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: U. S. History I; students in CP U.S. History I with an “A-” average and teacher approval may select ACP U.S. History II

In a chronological format, this course continues the study of United States history from 1900 to the present. The political and economic growth of our country, the causes and events surrounding World War I and II, the study of social issues, such as the role of minorities in the formation of our cultural heritage, and the increasing involvement of our nation in foreign affairs will be highlighted. This course will also reinforce and enhance the principles of leadership as well as help students develop a consciousness about the nature of our society.

U. S. HISTORY II (CP) Grades 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: U. S. History I
This course will present a survey study of the United States from the Spanish American War to modern times. It is designed to give students a sense of the growth and development of the American heritage. The needs of the students in terms of reading levels will be taken into consideration.
HONORS U. S. HISTORY II Grades 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: “A” average in ACP U. S. History I or “B-” average in Honors U. S. History I
The purpose of Honors U. S. History II is to provide the student with a deeper understanding of American history. This will be achieved by the variety of tasks such as primary source readings, book reviews, and analytical essays. Various schools of historical thought will be examined.
WORLD HISTORY (CP and ACP) Grades 11, 12

Students in CP U.S. History II with an “A-” average and teacher approval may select ACP World History


World History is a survey course. The first semester will provide the student with an understanding of the social, cultural and political development of ancient cultures. The second semester concentrates on European history and the impact of Europe on the major regions of the world. Students will develop an understanding of diverse cultures and the need to be tolerant. On the CP level emphasis will be on developing academic skills, as well as developing an appreciation for other cultures.

HONORS WORLD HISTORY Grades 11, 12
Prerequisite: “A” average in ACP U. S. History II teacher or “B-” average in Honors U.S. History II.
Honors World History is designed to provide the honors level student with a comprehensive introduction into the significant cultures, nations, ideas, and people instrumental in the development and progression of the world. The course also provides the student with the knowledge necessary for a comparative analysis of cultures and trends in history from prehistoric times to the twentieth century. The course also places strong emphasis upon the development of the student's ability to write critically, to formulate logical and substantive opinions, and to be able to voice those opinions in class discussions.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT AMERICAN GOVERNMENT and POLITICS Grade 12

dual enrollment course
Prerequisite: Students must have a minimum of a “B” average in their previous Honors History class or an “A” in their previous ACP History class and a recommendation from their current History teacher.
See page 7 for information on the AP application process.

The AP College Board test is mandatory

AP American Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on politics and government in the United States. Students will understand the concepts of political ideology and development of the political system and our democratic institutions. Students will be able to evaluate the role of the national government and its relationship to the concept of liberty in a pluralistic society. This course will emphasize the changing political culture of society and its effects on voting patterns, trends and the processes of government.


AMERICAN GOVERNMENT and POLITICS (ACP) Grade 12

(semester course)


This course offers an in-depth study of the systems of American government. The Constitution will provide a basis for the study of our federal, state, and local governments. The course will include a review of our political heritage, the American party system, opinion groups, lobbies, and the election process.
HISTORY AND MEDIA (ACP) Grade 12

(semester course)


Students will examine films, dramas, and documentaries as historical evidence. They will view films on various topics and participate in Inner/Outer Socratic seminar discussions. They will write essays comparing the film evidence to information in more traditional sources such as articles, critical commentaries, and historical reviews.

CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL ISSUES (ACP) Grade 12
Prerequisite: U. S. History I and II and World History
This course is designed for students who are interested in current events. Discussion will be an integral part of each class. The daily newspaper, magazines, television and radio are utilized as instructional tools and texts. The course will draw from a broad range of topics as daily events unfold. Students will explore controversial issues such as war and international law and delve into the area of international relations.


HONORS TWENTIETH CENTURY WORLD HISTORY Grade 12
Prerequisite: “B” average in ACP or “B-” in Honors World History.
This course will provide an introduction to the historical background of the crises of our age. Students will explore the impact of rising nationalism and declining colonialism and the struggle between democracy and dictatorship. An analysis of the consequences of war will be integral to the course.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT AMERICAN HISTORY Grades 10*, 12
Prerequisite: Students must have a minimum of a “B” average in their previous Honors History class or an “A” in their previous ACP History class and a recommendation from their current History teacher.

*Very well-qualified sophomores may take this course in lieu of taking Honors U. S. History II; a rigorous screening process will be required together with a summer assignment.
See page 7 for information on the AP application process.
The AP College Board test is mandatory.
This is an introductory college course for the advanced student. The topical approach is used to study the discovery era to the present, with special emphasis on those topics included in the Advanced Placement program syllabus. Independent research and in-depth readings on assigned topics are integral to the course.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY (dual enrollment course) Grades 11*, 12
Prerequisite: Students must have a minimum of a “B” average in their previous Honors History class or an “A” in their previous ACP History class and a recommendation from their current History teacher.

*Very well-qualified juniors may take this course in lieu of taking Honors World History; a rigorous screening process will be required.


See page 7 for information on the AP application process.
The AP College Board test is mandatory
This course is an extensive and intensive examination of global societies, social structure, and the themes and processes which have shaped our world since the Middle Ages. The students will learn the analytical and writing proficiencies necessary to succeed on the Advanced Placement World History exam.
PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY I (ACP) Grades 11, 12

(semester course)


This course introduces interested students to the fundamental concepts that support psychology as a scientific discipline. Students will explore the history of psychology, research methods and data analysis. Relevant topics will include sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, and memory.
PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY II (ACP) Grades 11, 12

(semester course)


Prerequisite: Successful completion of Principles of Psychology I.
This course will further student understanding of the field of psychology, and will take an in-depth look into human development, personality, abnormal psychology, treatment, and social psychology.
SOCIOLOGY (ACP) Grades 11, 12

(semester course)


Prerequisite: Students will be required to bring in an approved electronic device ( such as a tablet, laptop or

chromebook ) and register it through RBC’s BYOD program to be used daily.
This course is a scientific study of human society and social behavior. Its focus, therefore, is on the group rather than the individual. It emphasizes the concepts of culture, institutions, socialization and social inequality. Collective behavior and social movements receive special emphasis in the course.

CRIMINOLOGY and LAW (ACP) Grade 12
Prerequisite: “B“ average in CP, “B-” in ACP junior year history course; “C” in honors junior year history course.

Students will be required to bring in an approved electronic device ( such as a tablet, laptop or chromebook ) and register it through RBC’s BYOD program to be used daily.
Criminology is the scientific study of making laws, breaking laws, and society’s involvement/reaction/role. Criminologists study criminal behavior in a variety of ways to collect and analyze data, patterns, and trends to gain a better understanding of criminal origins and identify prevention measures. This course will define the nature of crime and the characteristics of those who commit them. The course will also examine our court and correction systems to identify their effectiveness in our society.




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