Prof. John H. Munro


F. Particular Demographic and Plague-Related Social Studies on England



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F. Particular Demographic and Plague-Related Social Studies on England

* 1. J. Saltmarsh, ‘Plague and Economic Decline in England in the Later Middle Ages’, Cambridge Historical Journal, 7 (1941).


* 2. J.C. Russell, British Medieval Population (Albequerque, 1948).
** 3. Michael Postan, ‘The Economic Foundations of Medieval Society’, Jahrbücher für Nationalökonomie, 161 (1951); and:
Michael Postan, ‘Some Economic Evidence of Declining Population in the Later Middle Ages’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 2 (1950), 130-67;
both reprinted in his Essays on Medieval Agriculture and General Problems of the Medieval Economy (Cambridge, 1973), pp. 3 - 27; and 186 - 213 (the latter, with the revised title of ‘Some Agrarian Evidence of Declining Population in the Later Middle Ages.’
* 4. J. Krause, ‘The Medieval Household: Large or Small?’ Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 9 (1956), 420-32. Important, especially as a critique of Russell.
5. H. E. Hallam, ‘Some Thirteenth-Century Censuses’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 10 (1957-58), 340-61.
6. J. B. Harley, ‘Population Trends and Agricultural Developments from the Warwickshire Hundred Rolls of 1279’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 11 (1958-9), 8-18.
7. Michael Postan and J.Z. Titow, ‘Heriots and Prices on Winchester Manors’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 11 (1959); reprinted in Michael Postan, Essays on Medieval Agriculture (Cambridge, 1973), pp. 150-85.
8. H. E. Hallam, ‘Population Density in Medieval Fenland’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 14 (1960-61), 71-81.
* 9. J. M. W. Bean, ‘Plague, Population, and Economic Decline in the Later Middle Ages’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 15 (1963), 423-37.
* 10. Sylvia Thrupp, ‘The Problem of Replacement Rates in Late Medieval English Population’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser., 18:1 (1965), 101-19.
* 11. Michael Postan, ‘Medieval Agrarian Society: England’, in Cambridge Economic History, Vol. I: The Agrarian Life of the Middle Ages, ed. M. M. Postan (2nd rev. edn. 1966), 560-70.
12. J.C. Russell, ‘The Pre-Plague Population of England’, Journal of British Studies, 5 (1966), 1-21.
* 13. G. Ohlin, ‘No Safety in Numbers: Some Pitfalls of Historical Statistics’, in Industrialization in Two Systems: Essays in Honor of Alexander Gerschenkron, ed. H. Rosovsky (New York, 1966): reprinted in Essays in Quantitative Economic History, ed. Roderick Floud (Oxford, 1974), pp. 59-78. An attack on Russell's statistical methods (no. 11 above).
* 14. Barbara Harvey, ‘The Population Trend in England Between 1300 and 1348’, Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 5th ser. 16 (1966), 23-42. Opposes Postan's thesis of a pre-plague population decline (implicitly supporting Russell); but see her later essay on this theme, in no. 57 below.
15. A.R.H. Baker, ‘Evidence in the ‘Nonarum Inquisitiones’ of Contracting Arable Lands in England during the Early Fourteenth Century’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 19 (1966), 518-32.
16. D.G. Watts, ‘A Model for the Early Fourteenth Century’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 20 (1967), 543-47.

** 17. J.Z. Titow, English Rural Society, 1200-1350 (1969), chapter 3, ‘The Standard of Living Controversy’, pp. 64-96. A trenchant and hostile critique of both Barbara Harvey and J.C. Russell, especially the latter.


18. J.F.D. Shrewsbury, A History of Bubonic Plague in the British Isles (Cambridge, 1970).
* 19. Michael Postan, The Medieval Economy and Society: An Economic History of Britain, 1100-1500 (Cambridge, 1972), chapter 3, pp. 27-40.
* 20. J. D. Chambers, Population, Economy and Society in Pre-Industrial England (London, 1972), chapters 1-3.
21. Edwin DeWindt, Land and People in Holywell-cum-Needingworth, 1252-1457 (Toronto, 1972): Especially chapter 2, pp. 107-61.
** 22. A. R. Bridbury, ‘The Black Death’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 26 (1973), 557-92.
* 23. Ian Kershaw, ‘The Great Famine and Agrarian Crisis in England, 1315-1322’, Past and Present, no. 59 (May 1973), 3-50. Reprinted in R.H. Hilton, ed., Peasants, Knights, and Heretics (Cambridge, 1976), pp. 85-132.
24. A.N. May, ‘An Index of Thirteenth-Century Peasant Impoverishment? Manor Court Fines’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 26 (1973), 389-402.
25. T. B. James and N. A. Price, ‘Measurement of the Change in Populations Through Time: Capture-Recapture Analysis of Population for St. Lawrence Parish, Southampton, 1454 to 1610’, The Journal of European Economic History, 5:3 (Winter 1976), 719-36.
** 26. John Hatcher, Plague, Population, and the English Economy, 1348-1530 (London, 1977), pp. 11-73. So far, the best survey on this subject.
27. Anthony R. Bridbury, ‘Before the Black Death’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 30 (1977), 393-410. (Only partly related to demographic issues, but relevant nonetheless).
28. David L. Farmer, ‘Grain Yields on the Winchester Manors in the Later Middle Ages’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 30 (1977), 555-66.
29. Richard H. Britnell, ‘Agricultural Technology and the Margin of Cultivation in the Fourteenth Century’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 30 (1977), 53-66.
30. Edward Miller and John Hatcher, Medieval England: Rural Society and Economic Change, 1086-1348 (London, 1978), chapters 2 and 9.
31. Robert S. Gottfried, Epidemic Disease in Fifteenth-Century England: The Medical Response and the Demographic Consequences (Leicester and Rutgers, 1978).
32. W. Harwood Long, ‘The Low Yields of Corn in Medieval England’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 32 (1979), 459-69.
33. S. H. Rigby, ‘Urban Decline in the Later Middle Ages: Some Problems in Interpreting the Statistical Data’, Urban History Yearbook 1979 (Leicester University Press, 1979), pp. 46 - 59.
* 34. J. L. Bolton, The Medieval English Economy, 1150-1500 (London, 1980), chapter 3: ‘The Overcrowded Island’, pp. 82-118; chapter 6: ‘Towards a Crisis’, pp. 180-206; chapter 7: ‘Crisis and Change in the Agrarian Economy’, pp. 207-45.

35. Zvi Razi, Life, Marriage and Death in a Medieval Parish: Economy, Society, and Demography in Halesowen, 1270-1400 (Past and Present Publications, Cambridge, 1980).


36. Zvi Razi, ‘Family, Land, and the Village Community in Later Medieval England’, Past and Present, no. 93 (Nov. 1981), 3-36.
37. H. E. Hallam, Rural England, 1066 - 1348 (London, 1981).
* 38. Christopher Dyer, ‘Deserted Medieval Villages in the West Midlands’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 35 (1982), 19-34.
39. Bruce M. Campbell, ‘Agricultural Progress in Medieval England: Some Evidence from Eastern Norfolk’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 36 (Feb. 1983), 26-46. See also:
40. Bruce Campbell, ‘Arable Productivity in Medieval England: Some Evidence from Norfolk’, Journal of Economic History, 43 (1983), 379-404.
41. M. Silver, ‘A Non-Neo Malthusian Model of English Land Values, Wages, and Grain Yields Before the Black Death’, Journal of European Economic History, 12 (Winter 1983), 631-50.
42. Christopher Dyer, ‘English Diet in the Later Middle Ages’, in T. H. Aston, P. R. Coss, C. Dyer, Joan Thirsk, eds., Social Relations and Ideas: Essays in Honour of R. H. Hilton (Cambridge University Press, 1983), pp. 191 - 216.
43. S. H. Rigby, ‘Urban Decline in the Later Middle Ages: The Reliability of the Non-Statistical Evidence’, Urban History Yearbook 1984 (Leicester University Press, 1984), pp. 45 - 60.
44. Derek Keene, ‘A New Study of London Before the Great Fire’, Urban History Yearbook 1984 (Leicester University Press, 1984), pp. 11 - 21.
* 45. Richard M. Smith, ed. Land, Kinship and Life-Cycle (Cambridge, 1984): collection of essays. See especially the following:
a) Bruce M. Campbell, ‘Population Pressure, Inheritance, and the Land Market in a Fourteenth-Century Peasant Community’, pp. 87 - 134.
b) Jack Ravensdale, ‘Population Changes and the Transfer of Customary Land on a Cambridgeshire Manor in the Fourteenth Century’, pp. 197 - 226.
c) Ian Blanchard, ‘Industrial Employment and the Rural Land Market, 1380 - 1520’, pp. 227 - 55.
d) Christopher Dyer, ‘Changes in the Size of Peasant Holdings in Some West Midland Villages, 1400-1500’, pp. 277 - 94.
46. H. E. Hallam, ‘The Climate of Eastern England, 1250-1350’, The Agricultural History Review, 32 (1984), 124-32.
* 47. L. R. Poos, ‘The Rural Population of Essex in the Later Middle Ages’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 38 (November 1985), 515 - 30.
* 48. John Hatcher, ‘Mortality in the Fifteenth Century: Some New Evidence’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 39 (Feb. 1986), 19 - 38.
49. Peter Franklin, ‘Peasant Widows' ‘Liberation’ and Remarriage Before the Black Death’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser. 39 (May 1986), 186 - 204.

50. Jack Goldstone, ‘The Demographic Revolution in England: A Re-examination’, Population Studies, 40 (1986), 5-33.


51. Robert Gottfried, Doctors and Medicine in Medieval England, 1340 - 1530 (Princeton, 1986).
52. L. R. Poos, ‘Population Turnover in Medieval Essex: The Evidence of Some Early Fourteenth-Century Tithing Lists’, in L. Bonfield, R.M. Smith, and K. Wrightson, eds., The World We Have Gained: Histories of Population and Social Structure (Oxford, 1986), pp. 1-22.
53. Francis X. Newman, ed., Social Unrest in the Late Middle Ages, Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies vol. 39 (Binghampton, New York, 1986):
(a) D. W. Robertson, Jr., ‘Chaucer and the Economic and Social Consequences of the Plague’, pp. 49-74.
(b) John B. Friedman, ‘ ‘He Hath a Thousand Slayn This Pestilence’: Iconography of the Plague in the late Middle Ages’, pp. 75-112.
(c) Russell A. Peck, ‘Social Conscience and the Poets’, pp. 113-48.
* 54. H. E. Hallam, ‘Population Movements in England, 1086 - 1350’, and ‘Rural England and Wales, 1042 - 1350’, in H. E. Hallam, ed., The Agrarian History of England and Wales, II: 1042 - 1350 (Cambridge University Press, 1988), pp. 508 - 93, and 966 - 1008. Important; but unfortunately rather outdated by the time it was finally published.
55. Christopher Dyer, ‘Changes in Diet in the Late Middle Ages: The Case of Harvest Workers’, The Agricultural History Review, 36 (1988), 21 - 38.
56. Christopher Dyer, ‘ ‘The Retreat from Marginal Land’: The Growth and Decline of Medieval Rural Settlements’, in M. Aston, D. Austin, and C. Dyer, eds., The Rural Settlements of Medieval England (Oxford: Blackwell, 1989), pp. 45 - 57.
57. Derek Keene, ‘Medieval London and Its Region’, The London Journal, 14 (1989), 99 - 111.
58. Mark Bailey, ‘Blowing up Bubbles: Some New Demographic Evidence for the Fifteenth Century?’ Journal of Medieval History, 15 (1989), 347-58.
59. M. Lyons, ‘Weather, Famine, Pestilence, and Plague in Ireland, 900-1500’, in M.E. Crawford, ed., Famine: the Irish Experience, 900-1900 (Edinburgh, 1989).
* 60. Nils Hybel, Crisis or Change? The Concept of Crisis in the Light of Agrarian Structural Reorganization in Late Medieval England (Aarhus: Aarhus University Press, 1989). For discussions of the literature on demographic changes, see: Chapter I.1-8, pp. 1-14; Chapter IV.1-5, pp. 105-17; Chapter VI.1-6, pp. 178-90; Chapter VII.6, pp. 228-30; and especially Chapter VIII.4-15, pp. 261-97.
* 61. Bruce M.S. Campbell, ed., Before the Black Death: Studies in the ‘Crisis’ of the Early Fourteenth Century (Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 1991).
a) Barbara Harvey, ‘Introduction: the ‘Crisis’ of the early fourteenth century’, pp. 1 - 24.
** b) Richard M. Smith, ‘Demographic developments in rural England, 1300-48: a survey’, pp. 25 - 78.
c) Mavis Mate, ‘The agrarian economy of south-east England before the Black Death: depressed or bouyant?’, pp. 79 - 109.
d) John H. Munro, ‘Industrial transformations in the north-west European textile trades, c.1290 - c.1340: economic progress or economic crisis?’, pp. 110 - 48.
e) W. Mark Ormrod, ‘The crown and the English economy, 1290 - 1348’, pp. 149 - 83.
f) Mark Bailey, ‘Per impetum maris: natural disaster and economic decline in eastern England, 1275 - 1350’, pp. 184 - 208.
62. E. D. Jones, ‘A Few Bubbles More: the Myntling Register Revisited’, Journal of Medieval History, 17 (1991), 263-9.
63. Alan Dyer, Decline and Growth in British Towns, 1400 - 1600, Studies in Economic and Social History, London: Macmillan Press, 1991.
* 64. Edward Miller, ‘Introduction: Land and People’, and various authors, ‘The Occupation of the Land’, in Edward Miller, ed., The Agrarian History of England and Wales, Vol. III: 1348 - 1500 (Cambridge University Press, 1991), pp. 1 - 33; 34 - 174.
65. Lawrence R. Poos, A Rural Society after the Black Death: Essex, 1350 - 1525, Cambridge Studies in Population, Economy and Society in Past Time no. 18 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991), especially chapter 6: ‘Components of Demographic Equilibrium’, pp. 111-30.
66. S. J. Payling, ‘Social Mobility, Demographic Change, and Landed Society in Late-Medieval England’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser., 45 (February 1992), 51-73.
67. Bruce M. S. Campbell, ‘A Fair Field Once Full of Folk: Agrarian Change in an Era of Population Decline, 1348 - 1500’, Agricultural History Review, 41:1 (1993), 60 - 70. A review article of Edward Miller, ed., The Agrarian History of England and Wales, Vol. III: 1348-1500 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991).
68. Barbara Harvey, Living and Dying in England, 1140 - 1540: The Monastic Experience (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993).
* 69. Bruce M. S. Campbell, James A. Galloway, Derek Keene, and Margaret Murphy, A Medieval Capital and Its Grain Supply: Agrarian Production and Distribution in the London Region c. 1300, Institute of British Geographers, Historical Geography Research Series no. 30 (London, 1993). Difficult to find: but the LC call number is: HD 9041.8 L5 M54 1993. Very important for calculating new estimates of England’s population ca. 1300: see pp. 42-45.
** 70. John Hatcher, ‘England in the Aftermath of the Black Death’, Past & Present, no. 144 (August 1994), pp. 3 - 35.
71. Nicholas J. Mayhew, ‘Population, Money Supply, and the Velocity of Circulation in England, 1300 - 1700’, Economic History Review, 2nd ser., 48:2 (May 1995), 238-57.
72. William Dohar, The Black Death and Pastoral Leadership: the Diocese of Hereford in the Fourteenth Century (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995).
* 73. Mark Bailey, ‘Demographic Decline in Late-Medieval England: Some Thoughts on Recent Research’, The Economic History Review, 2nd ser., 49:1 (February 1996), 1-19.
* 74. Colin Platt, King Death: The Black Death and Its Aftermath in Late-Medieval England (London: University College London Press; and Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996).
* 75. Mark Ormrod and Phillip Lindley, eds., The Black Death in England (Stamford: Paul Watkins, 1996).
a) Jeremy Goldberg, ‘Introduction’, pp. 1-16.
b) Jim Bolton, ‘‘The World Upside Down’: Plague as an Agent of Economic and Social Change’, pp. 17-78.
c) Christopher Harper-Bill, ‘The English Church and English Religion after the Black Death’, pp. 79-123.
d) Phillip Lindley, ‘The Black Death and English Art: A Debate and Some Assumptions’, pp. 125-46.
e) Mark Ormrod, ‘The Politics of Pestilence: Government in Engalnd after the Black Death’, pp. 147-81.
76. Richard Britnell and John Hatcher, eds., Progress and Problems in Medieval England (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996). In particular:
** a) Pamela Nightingale, ‘The Growth of London in the Medieval English Economy’, pp. 89-106. Challenges Postan’s and Hallam’s population estimates for England c.1300, supporting the revised views of Campbell-Galloway-Keene-Murphy, in no. 69, above.
b) Christopher Dyer, ‘Taxation and Communities in Late Medieval England’, pp. 168-90.
c) Ambrose Raftis, ‘Peasants and the Collapse of the Manorial Economy on Some Ramsey Abbey Estates’, pp. 191-206.
d) David Farmer, ‘The famuli in the Later Middle Ages’, pp. 207-36.
e) John Hatcher, ‘The Great Slump of the Mid-Fifteenth Century, ‘ pp. 237-72.
77. Michael Anderson, ed., British Population History from the Black Death to the Present Day, Studies in Social and Economic History (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996).
78. Zvi Razi, ‘Manorial Court Rolls and Local Population: An East Anglian Case Study’, The Economic History Review, 2nd ser., 49:4 (Nov. 1996), 758-763.
79. Mavis E. Mate, Daughters, Wives, and Widows after the Black Death: Women in Sussex, 1350-1535 (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell Press, 1998).
* 80. Barbara Harvey and Jim Oeppen, ‘Patterns of Morbidity in Late Medieval England: a Sample from Westminster Abbey’, The Economic History Review, 2nd ser., 54:2 (May 2001), 215-39.
* 81. John Hatcher and Mark Bailey, Modelling the Middle Ages: The History and Theory of England's Economic Development (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001).
* 82. Andrew Hinde, England’s Population: A History Since the Domesday Survey (London: Hodder Arnold, 2003).
83. Stuart J. Borsch, The Black Death in Egypt and England: a Comparative Study (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2005). See my review (somewhat hostile) in EH.NET BOOK REVIEW, < eh.net-review@eh.net> 13 March 2006.
** 84. Pamela Nightingale, ‘Some New Evidence of Crises and Trends of Mortality in Late Medieval England’, Past and Present, no. 187 (May 2005), pp. 33-68.
** 85. Bruce M.S. Campbell, ‘The Agrarian Problem in the Early Fourteenth Century’, Past & Present, no. 188 (August 2005), pp. 3-70.
* 86. Chris Briggs, ‘Taxation, Warfare, and the Early Fourteenth Century “Crisis” in the North: Cumberland Lay Subsidies, 1332-1348’, The Economic History Review, 2nd ser., 58:4 (November 2005), 639-72.
87. David Stone, Decision-Making in Medieval Agriculture (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2005).
88. Christopher Dyer, An Age of Transition? Economy and Society in England in the Later Middle Ages (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2005).
89. John Langdon and James Masschaele, ‘Commercial Activity and Population Growth in Medieval England’, Past & Present, no. 190 (February 2006), pp. 35-81.
90. Bruce M. S. Campbell and Ken Bartley, England on the Eve of the Black Death: An Atlas of Lay Lordship, Land, and Wealth, 1300 - 49 (Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2006).
* 91. John Hatcher, A. J. Piper, and David Stone, ‘Monastic Mortality: Durham Priory, 1395 – 1539’, The Economic History Review, 2nd ser., 59:4 (November 2006), 667-687.
92. Ben Dodds and Richard Britnell, eds., Agriculture and Rural Society After the Black Death: Common Themes and Regional Variations, Studies in Regional and Local History 6 (Herftord: University of Hertfordshire Press, 2008).
93. Katherine L. French, The Good Women of the Parish: Gender and Religion after the Black Death (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008).
* 94. John Munro, ‘Before and After the Black Death: Money, Prices, and Wages in Fourteenth-Century England’, in Troels Dohlerup and Per Ingesman, eds., New Approaches to the History of Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe: Selected Proceedings of Two International Conferences at the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters in Copenhagen in 1997 and 1999, Historisk-filosofiske Meddelelser 104 (Copenhagen: The Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, 2009), pp. 335-64.
* 95. Stephen H. Rigby, ‘Urban Population in Late Medieval England: the Evidence of the Lay Subsidies’, The Economic History Review, 2nd ser., 63:2 (May 2010), 393-417.
* 96. Pamela Nightingale, ‘Gold, Credit, and Mortality: Distinguishing Deflationary Pressures on the Late Medieval English Economy’, Economic History Review, 63:4 (November 2010), 1081-1104.
* 97. John Munro, ‘The Late-Medieval Decline of English Demesne Agriculture: Demographic, Monetary, and Political-Fiscal Factors’, in Mark Bailey and Stephen Rigby, eds., Town and Countryside in the Age of the Black Death: Essays in Honour of John Hatcher, The Medieval Countryside, vol. 12 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2012), pp. 299-348.
* 98. Gregory Clark, ‘1381 and the Malthus Delusion’, Explorations in Economic History, 50:1 (January 2013), 4-15.




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