Poetry and Paragraphs: a 16-Week Course of Integrated Literature, Research, and Paragraph Writing for Middle School and Early High School


Images--For purposes of poetry, words that evoke any of the five senses, including shapes, colors, textures, sounds, and smells. Cliché



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Images--For purposes of poetry, words that evoke any of the five senses, including shapes, colors, textures, sounds, and smells.

Cliché—tired, overused words and phrases that writers should avoid.
Week 2: Imagine More Imagery



Poets may employ any of the five senses to help the reader understand their ideas. The senses include sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch. We call words that communicate things that can be sensed with the five senses concrete. Those who object that some poems describe imaginary things (toys that come to life, make believe places) should remember that imaginary things meet the definition of concrete. If unicorns walked around your yard, you would know this because you would see the unicorns. You might even hear their whinnies and the pounding of their hooves or pat their soft, cool sides. Thus, unicorns (and other imaginary things) meet the definition of concrete.
On the other hand, abstract words refer to ideas that no one can easily point to or even detect with scientific instruments: love, hate, sorrow, happiness… A poem may be about an abstract idea, but poets usually avoid abstract words.



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