Please note that the School of Art ge sco example and formatting that follows differs from the new



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Please note that the School of Art GE SCO example and formatting that follows differs from the new University GE SCO format and guidelines that were updated in late spring, 2015. Please see the new University GE SCO Template and Outline here: http://web.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/ge/faculty/ while the School of Art Curriculum Committee is updating this document. In other words, you may want to continue to refer to the information in this document, though the new University GE SCO format and instructions should be used.


CSULB School of Art

Standard Course Outline Template for General Education courses

May 5, 2015
This template, which is based in part on a document drafted by COTA in February 2014 as well as instructions in the CSULB Curriculum Handbook, offers guidelines for creating a Standard Course Outline for a General Education course.
It meets the minimum requirements outlined in Academic Senate Policy PS 11-07:

http://www.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/grad_undergrad/senate/policy/academic/numerical/SCO.html
It is also in accordance with the instructions and sample template provided in the CSULB Curriculum Handbook.

Handbook instructions:

http://www.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/catalog/curr_handbook/section_4/4-6_ps1107.html

Handbook sample template:

http://web.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/catalog/curr_handbook/section_4/4-5_sco_sample.html
In addition, it is in accordance with the SCO template offered to faculty on the university website that explains “GE Course Development and Approval”:

http://www.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/ge/faculty/

At this website, click on the link “Standard Course Outline (SCO).”
In the SOA template that follows, instructions are italicized; once you have completed the SCO, be sure to delete these italicized instructions.

School of Art

California State University, Long Beach

[insert Course Letter, Number, and Title]

Standard Course Outline
I. General Information
A. Course number:

B. Title:

C. Units:

D. Prerequisites or Corequisites: [Be sure to specify GE prerequisites. Also be attentive to punctuation and conjunctions to ensure that requisites are clear:…..“Either AH111A, AH 111B, AH 112, or consent of instructor”...“AH111A, AH 111B, and AH 112; or consent of instructor”…]

E. Responsible faculty:

F. SCO prepared by:

G. Date prepared or revised:

H. Classification code [CS-Factor—may affect enrollment cap; see Academic Analyst]:

I. Course typically offered [e.g. Fall only]:

J. [Optional: specify if course will be cross-listed with a course in another department]


II. Catalog Description
Provide the description of the course that should appear in the Catalog; the description cannot exceed 40 words.
In a separate paragraph, list all prerequisites (including "consent of instructor”), fieldwork hours, service learning components, lab or material fees, designations such as "Credit/No Credit" or "Letter grade only (A-F),” and other requirements that do not describe the content of the course. This information is not included in the 40-word limit.
III. Curriculum Justification(s)

Explain in general terms the reason for the creation of the course, its relevance to degree requirements and GE objectives, and/or its function within department and/or area curriculum.
Be sure to explain how the course fulfills the requirements for the GE Category and Classifications. In doing so, be sure to consult and make use of the information found at the following websites:

Division of Academic Affairs information on “GE Course Development and Approval”:

http://www.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/ge/faculty/

Section 6 of the Curriculum Handbook, which focuses on General Education:

http://www.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/catalog/curr_handbook/section_6/course_approval_process.html
IV. Measurable Student Learning Outcomes, Evaluation Instruments, and Instructional Strategies for Skill Development

In this section, provided a bulleted list of Student Learning Outcomes relevant to the course, knowledge content as well as skill outcomes. Specify the course content that students should be able to articulate in written or oral assignments (what they should know) and the skills students should attain (what they should able to do) upon completion of the course. All outcomes should be described in a way that they are easily measurable through assessment tools (course assignments).
In your SCO, state that these outcomes should appear on all course syllabi.
After each SLO, indicate possible evaluation instruments (assessment tools), as well as instructional strategies.
Typically, there should be no more than 5 Student Learning Outcomes.
In preparing SLO’s, be sure to consult the GE Essential Skills GRID and the list of GE Essential Skills and Outcomes designated on the university website that explains “GE Course Development and Approval”:

[http://www.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/ge/faculty/]

For a list of action verbs often used in writing Student Learning Outcomes and information concerning Bloom’s Taxonomy of skills, which you may also find useful, see the Appendix below.
Examples:


  1. SLO: Students will demonstrate an ability to describe and analyze important developments in the history, critical interpretation, and interrelationship of animation in film, video, art, and design.


EVALUATION INSTRUMENTS (ASSIGNMENTS): In-class exams, a research paper, and class participation. Students will be evaluated on quality, completeness, and clarity of written analysis of assigned readings.
INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES FOR SKILL DEVELOPMENT:

Lectures with digital projection of imagery, text and films, textbook reading assignments, additional readings of related articles and/or essays, discussions.

Other examples of SLO’s:
Successful students will demonstrate the ability to:
Describe and analyze …[course content]…
Describe and analyze how artistic content and style are related to social, political, economic and cultural phenomena in a given culture.
Gather information and ideas about…[course content]… using print and digital technologies and sources.
Organize ideas and information and effectively articulate them in…[assessment tools]…
Analyze and synthesize information and perspectives from various sources concerning…[course content] through effective written and oral communication.
Appropriately cite source material in bibliographic and footnote or endnote form.
Use techniques of hand drawing to effectively generate and communicate design concepts for three-dimensional objects.
Effectively fabricate three-dimensional models and full-scale mock-ups used in the preliminary design phase of object making.
Effectively draw art objects with CAD or other forms of 3-D drafting software.
Critically evaluate design concepts present in renderings and models for art objects.
Make use of disciplinary vocabulary to identify, describe, and analyze the common elements of animation art/design.
Identify, describe, and analyze creative aspects of animated productions including stylistic characteristics, such as narrative, non-narrative, and other information/language structures (for example, linear, non-linear, thematic, cinematic, interactive, and other formal elements).
Contrast and/or synthesize personal analyses, observations, and reactions with those of scholars in the discipline.
Articulate course content (historical material, aesthetic principles, and theories and methods of critical interpretation), explore issues, and formulate opinions in classroom critiques and discussions.
V. Outline of Subject Matter

This serves as a guide to information covered in the course. It may be presented in a week-by-week format or in longer blocks of time, such as Weeks 1 – 3, Weeks 4 – 6, etc.
Be sure that course subject matter is directly aligned with Student Learning Outcomes. Indicate the relevant SLO in parentheses after each description of course content.
Indicate if subject matter and schedule will be subject to change, depending on the instructor.

If applicable, state the following: “This is a broad outline of topics to be covered. Subject matter and sequence of topics may vary by instructor.”
Example:
This course will consist of lectures, discussions, demonstrations, readings, critiques, technical exercises and three student projects. Subject matter and schedule is subject to change by instructor. The following is a broad outline of topics to be covered. Subject matter and sequence of topics may vary by instructor.



Weeks

Content

SLO

1-3

Orthographic Projection

1,5,6

4-5

Isometric, Dimetric, Trimetric

Paraline Projection

1,5,6

6

Scaling Objects

1-3,5,6

7-10

Model Making Materials and Techniques

1-3,5,6

11-12

2-D CAD

4-6

13-15

3-D CAD

4-6




  • Lectures present historical and contemporary applications of technical drawing and model making within the disciplines of Architecture, Furniture Design, Sculpture and Engineering.

  • Technical demonstrations of CAD software, technical drawing by hand and model making present the skill sets needed for students to complete in class exercises and student projects

  • Group Critiques provide a forum for project evaluation and a diversity of ideas


VI. Methods of Instruction

Specify the methods that instructors should use to present course information or demonstrate skills, e.g. lecture, small-group presentations, student-driven discussions, films, reading assignments, skill demonstrations, etc.
VII. Extent and Nature of Technology Use

Indicate the extent and nature of use of technology in teaching and learning.

You may include a statement such as the following in the Standard Course Outline:

The use of technology will depend on individual instructors, but should include various aspects of BeachBoard (including Turnitin plagiarism detection software). The course may familiarize students with relevant search databases in the library, including ArtStor, and other web resources specific to the course. It may offer a Course Guide customized for the course by the CSULB art librarian. Film and video, as well as music, may be used in the classroom.”


VIII. Information about Textbooks / Readings

Include a statement such as the following Standard Course Outline: “The following textbooks are most likely to be used for this course. Instructors may assign others, but should designate both required and recommended texts.”
a) Required Texts

List all required texts, including instructor course packet if applicable.
b) Recommended Texts

List all recommended texts, including instructor course packet if applicable.
Present all texts in bibliographic format appropriate to the discipline.
IX. Instructional Policies Requirements
Include the following paragraphs in the Standard Course Outline:
1. Policies for Attendance, Withdrawal, Late assignments:

The instructor's syllabus will contain explicit statements of attendance, withdrawal and late assignment policies, which will be consistent with University policies. Instructors will refer to the current California State University, Long Beach Catalog of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies and to the Academic Senate website for campus guidelines and policy statements as they develop their individual course policies.

In establishing attendance policy, faculty should consult the Academic Senate policy on attendance: http://www.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/grad_undergrad/senate/documents/policy/2001/01/
2. Special Needs Statement

The syllabus will note the following:

It is the student’s responsibility to notify the instructor in advance of the need for accommodation of a university verified disability.


X. Bibliography

The College of the Arts suggests that SCO provide a bibliography consisting of books, journals, articles, and other sources that is relevant to the scope of knowledge required to teach the course. These resources can serve as a guide for the instructor teaching the course or may be assigned to students for reading. Be sure to include recent publications, as well as earlier standard resources.
XI. Student-­Level Assessment
When applicable, include a statement Standard Course Outline such as the following:

This is a sample. Individual instructors will create their own Assignments and Assessment Plan. If instructors include additional assessments, these need to be explicitly linked to SLOs.”


Then list or briefly describe key assessment tools, i.e., the assignments that will be used to measure student performance for each of the SLOs listed in section 3. For each assignment, specify the number of the corresponding SLO in parentheses.
The College of the Arts recommends that these assessments be general in nature and not prescriptive, so as to allow instructors to use their discretion in choosing assignments. The descriptions, however, should be sufficient to allow course instructors to incorporate them in their syllabi.
The following matrix is an example of how to display course assessments linked to SLOs.
Assessment in Course XXX:

Assignment Description

Linked to SLO

% of Course Grade

Assignment #1
(brief descriptive title and/or description)


SLO #3

xx%

Assignment #2
(brief descriptive title and/or description)


SLO #2

xx%

Assignment #3
(brief descriptive title and/or description)


SLO #1

xx%

Assignment #4
(brief descriptive title and/or description)


SLO #4

xx%

Assignment #5
(brief descriptive title and/or description)



SLO #5

xx%”

Another example:

ASSIGNMENT DESCRIPTION – SLO – % OF COURSE GRADE
Exam #1 SLO #1–4 30%

Image/Film Identifications, short-answer questions, essay question(s)
Research paper (6-8 pages) SLO #1–4 30%
Exam #2 SLO #1–4 30%

Image/Film identifications, short-answer questions, essay question(s)
Participation SLO #5 10%

Contributions in group discussion, response papers, attendance
Include the following three paragraphs Standard Course Outline:

Grading policies and procedures and the percentage of the course grade associated with each assessment must be explicit on each instructor's syllabus. Instructors must develop scoring guidelines for assessments, which must be made available to students.


The final course grade may be based on a descriptive scale such as the following:

90-100%

=

A

mastery of the relevant course standards.

80-89%

=

B

above average proficiency in meeting course standards.

70-79%

=

C

satisfactory proficiency in meeting course standards.

60-69%

=

D

partial proficiency in meeting course standards.

Below 60%

=

F

little or no proficiency in meeting course standards.


In compliance with university policy, final grades should be based on at least three, and preferably four or more, demonstrations of competence. In no case will any single assignment or the final examination grade count for more than one-third of the course grade.”
XII. Course-­Level Assessment Plan

In the Standard Course Outline, indicate how course-level assessment will be conducted.
Example:
Assessment work for this GE course will be conducted throughout the (usually five-­year) cycle prior to its recertification due date. The School of Art has chosen the Single-Course Track option for recertification.
The Primary Essential GE Skills to be assessed for this course are:

  • Intercultural Knowledge

  • Creativity and Discovery

Interdisciplinary Learning
Student Performance Benchmarks:

Intercultural Knowledge and Competence: Students will demonstrate the ability to identify, describe, and analyze film language extrapolated from viewing and discussing films in class and be able to articulate their relationship to markers of social identity. Students will take part in discussions of ethnicity in film and Interpret intercultural experiences from the perspectives of their own and other worldviews and demonstrate the ability to act in a supportive manner that recognizes the feelings of another cultural group.



  • Creativity and Discovery: Students will demonstrate the ability to evaluate and reflect on the creative process and embrace contradictions by integrating alternate, divergent, or contradictory perspectives extrapolated from the animated films; demonstrate Innovative thinking by extending a novel or unique idea, question or format to create new knowledge or knowledge that crosses boundaries and transform ideas or solutions into entirely new forms.

Interdisciplinary Learning: Students will demonstrate the ability to connect to the experience of animation film making and meaningfully synthesize connections among these experiences outside of the formal classroom (including life experiences and academic experiences) to deepen understanding of animation history and film and to broaden their own point of view; independently draw conclusions by combining examples, facts, or theories from a variety of perspectives in animation, film and art.
Student performance of these benchmarks will be assessed through a random selection of student work in course assignments. The School of Art will create and utilize rubrics based on GEGC rubrics to appropriately assess development of Essential GE Skills.
The Secondary GE Skills that instructors should also cover are:

Written Communication

Information Literacy

Inquiry and Analysis


Student Performance Benchmarks:

Written Communication: Students will demonstrate the ability to write in clear prose, employing conventions of standard written English, appropriate rhetorical strategies, and compositional forms suitable to comparative analysis; to locate relevant information in both scholarly and popular print and digital sources using the University library and other online databases; and to appropriately cite sources and construct a bibliography.

Information Literacy: Students will demonstrate the ability to effectively determine key concepts and answer research questions based on information related to these concepts; accesses information using effective, well- designed search strategies and list most appropriate information sources; and use this information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose

Inquiry and Analysis: Students will demonstrate the ability to synthesize in-depth information from relevant sources representing various points of view/approaches; organize and synthesize evidence to reveal insightful patterns, differences, or similarities related to films in animation history; state a conclusion that is a logical extrapolation from the inquiry findings.


XIII. Consistency of SCO Standards Across Sections

Include the following paragraph in the Standard Course Outline:

The course coordinator will review the SCO and offer advice and/or materials to each faculty member new to teaching the course. All future syllabi will conform to the SCO. The course coordinator may offer or require regular review of instructors’ course materials as well as anonymous samples of student work.


XIV. Additional Resource for Development of Syllabi

Include the following paragraph in the Standard Course Outline:

The Academic Senate has adopted a policy specifying required content for course syllabi. Instructors are encouraged to consult the Academic Senate web site for further information.

If you have questions or would like further information, please contact the Office of Undergraduate Studies and Academic Advising at (562) 985-­7538.
XV. CSU Assistive Technology Initiative (Fall 2007)

Include the following paragraph in the Standard Course Outline:

In keeping with the CSU Assistive Technology Initiative (Fall 2007), instructors are required to make their course syllabi and materials accessible to all students, whether in print or electronic form. The Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM) Center located in AS- 116 can be of assistance in this process.


APPENDIX
STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES (SLO) ACTION VERB LIST —

Suggested Verbs to Use for Each Level of Thinking Skills

Below are terms (verbs) that can be used when defining student learning outcomes for a course or degree program.




Knowledge

Comprehension

Application

Count
Define
Describe
Draw
Identify
Labels
List
Match
Name
Outlines
Point
Quote
Read
Recall
Recite
Recognize
Record
Repeat
Reproduces
Selects
State
Write

Associate
Compute
Convert
Defend
Discuss
Distinguish
Estimate
Explain
Extend
Extrapolate
Generalize
Give examples
Infer
Paraphrase
Predict
Rewrite
Summarize

Add
Apply
Calculate
Change
Classify
Complete
Compute
Demonstrate
Discover
Divide
Examine
Graph
Interpolate
Manipulate
Modify
Operate
Prepare
Produce
Show
Solve
Subtract
Translate
Use

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation

Analyze
Arrange
Breakdown
Combine
Design
Detect
Develop
Diagram
Differentiate
Discriminate
Illustrate
Infer
Outline
Point out
Relate
Select
Separate
Subdivide
Utilize

Categorize
Combine
Compile
Compose
Create
Drive
Design
Devise
Explain
Generate
Group
Integrate
Modify
Order
Organize
Plan
Prescribe
Propose
Rearrange
Reconstruct
Related
Reorganize
Revise
Rewrite
Summarize
Transform
Specify

Appraise
Assess
Compare
Conclude
Contrast
Criticize
Critique
Determine
Grade
Interpret
Judge
Justify
Measure
Rank
Rate
Support
Test

Source: http://www.enmu.edu/academics/assessment/faculty/manual/verb_list.shtml
BLOOM’S TAXONOMY —

In defining Student Learning Outcomes, you may also wish to make use of Bloom’s Taxonomy, a framework long used by educators to specify educational goals.



The following website created by Vanderbilt University Center for Learning provides general information, as well as the original and revised versions of the skill taxonomy.

http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/blooms-taxonomy/


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