Phl 101 105 hnr: issuesinphilosoph y



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Suffolk Community College, Selden, New York 11784

PHL 101 - 105 HNR: I S S U E S I N P H I L O S O P H Y
Instructor: Dr. Gertrude Postl Office: Southampton Building 120

Fall 2009, Section 91367 Tel. 451-4513 (Main Office: 451-4093)



Time: T/R 11:00-12:15 p.m. postlg@sunysuffolk.edu

Location: Annex 102 Office Hours: M 11:00 - 12:00 a.m.

T/R 12:30 - 1:30 p.m.

W 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Upon successful completion of Issues in Philosophy (PL 11), the student will be able to:

(1) identify traditional and current issues in epistemology and metaphysics;

(2) distinguish between and critically assess major approaches in epistemology, such as Empiricism, Rationalism and Skepticism;

(3) distinguish and critically assess competing metaphysical approaches, for example, in Mind-Body, Personal Identity, and Freewill;

(4) demonstrate skills of information management (basic on-line and/or library research).

Procedures for accomplishing these objectives: Lectures, class discussion, in-class group projects, written assignments;
TEXTS:

1) Plato, Phaedo, trans., G.M. A. Grube, Hackett, 1977.

2) Rene Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy, trans. Donald A. Cress, 3rd ed., Hackett, 1993.

3) David Hume, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, ed. by Eric Steinberg, 2nd ed., Hackett, 1993.

4) Friedrich Nietzsche, A Nietzsche Reader, ed. by R. J. Hollingdale, Penguin Classics, 1977.

5) Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism and Human Emotions, Citadel Press, 1987.


REQUIREMENTS:

1) FIVE TEXT REPORTS

Before a text is discussed in class, each student has to turn in a brief account of the text in question. Each report has to be approx. one page long, indicating the main themes and/or arguments of the respective text. See schedule for deadlines. Focus only on the sections listed on the course outline. The purpose of these reports is not to demonstrate full comprehension of the text but to show that a text has been read.
2) ONE RESEARCH PAPER

This paper should be at least five pages long (it may be longer), typed, double-spaced, and in the appropriate academic format (title, correct quotations, etc.). An outline with brief bibliography has to be handed in by mid-semester. Deadlines: Outline – Oct. 29, Final Paper: Dec. 10. Papers received after this deadline will not be accepted! See separate handout for details and topics. For problems with writing papers, please consult the Writing Center (Islip Arts Building 101).


3) MIDTERM EXAM

Covering the first half of the course material (Plato, Descartes) – one essay, definitions, and brief essay questions.


4) FINAL EXAM

Covering the second half of the course material (Hume, Nietzsche, Sartre) – one essay, definitions, and brief essay questions.


5) CLASS PARTICIPATION, READING ASSIGNMENTS AND BEHAVIOR




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