Periodic report of the united states of america to the united nations committee on the elimination of racial discrimination


B. Security of person and protection by the State against violence or bodily harm



Download 0.51 Mb.
Page14/25
Date20.01.2021
Size0.51 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   25
B. Security of person and protection by the State against violence or bodily harm.

87. The U.S. Constitution and laws provide protection against violence or bodily harm through statutes such as the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, the Civil Rights Acts, and federal “hate crimes” laws. Hate crimes are discussed under Article 4, above.

88. Measures to prevent racially motivated acts of violence and ensure prompt response from the justice system. As described in paragraphs 166 and 177 of the Common Core Document and above under Article 4, DOJ/CRS assists state and local governments, private and public organizations, and community groups in preventing and resolving racial and ethnic tensions, incidents, and civil disorders, and restoring racial stability and harmony, through mediation, technical assistance and training. Other federal, state, and local agencies also engage in training and community outreach to prevent racially motivated acts of violence. Please see the discussion of outreach under Article 7, below, for some of the measures taken.

89. Measures to prevent use of illegal force by police against protected groups. With regard to Article 5 and paragraph 25 of the Committee’s Concluding Observations, the Constitution and federal statutes prohibit racially discriminatory actions by law enforcement agencies, see, e.g., the Pattern or Practice of Police Misconduct provision of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, 42 U.S.C. 14141, and the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, 42 U.S.C. 3789d. Since 2009, the Administration has intensified its enforcement of these laws. Federal law prohibits the use of excessive force by any law enforcement officer against any individual in the United States, including members of racial and ethnic minorities, and undocumented migrants crossing U.S. borders.  Victims of police brutality may seek legal remedies, such as criminal punishment of the perpetrator or civil damages. DOJ has successfully prosecuted law enforcement officers and public officials where sufficient evidence indicates that they willfully violated a person’s constitutional rights.



Directory: english -> bodies -> cerd -> docs
docs -> February 2008 Prepared by: The Center for Democratic Renewal hate groups mainstreaming of the Far Right
docs -> Domestic violence
docs -> Hurricane katrina: Racial Discrimination and Ethnic Cleansing in the United States in the Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina
docs -> United States of America Apology Resolution United States Public Law 103-150 Congress Joint Resolution 19
docs -> U. S. Prisons a response to the Periodic Report of the United States of America April 2007
docs -> Rights of immigrants and migrants to the united states: a critical look at the u. S. And its compliance under the convention
docs -> United Nations cerd/C/ven/19-21
docs -> Review of the Periodic Report of the United States of America
docs -> Discrimination in the legal profession


Share with your friends:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   25




The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2020
send message

    Main page