Parametric Places



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macintosh hd:users:philipsperanza:documents:archive:work:2011 oregon_research:523_s14:placing stations 01.jpg

Placing Stations tool with students Stephen Maher and Zeta Fernando, © Parametric Places UO 2013
Parametric Places: 22@ Barcelona, Urban Design From the Bottom Up

ARCH 423 / 523 - Spring 2014 Syllabus

In association with the UIxD Urban Interactions Lab
Drawings are primary instrument for the production of architecture. But a design process that remains limited to the relationship between drawings and real-space buildings is constrained to the actualization of conventions and commonly resists the integration of variation, local specificities or changes of conditions. This is where the diagrammatic process becomes advantageous in a culture characterized by change.”

  • Alejandro Zaera-Polo


Instructors

Philip Speranza, Assistant Professor Office: 485 Lawrence speranza@uoregon.edu


Time & Place

Class meets on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4:00- 5:50 Pm, LA 279


Course Overview

The term ‘parametric places’ evokes the relationship between abstract systems and real-world context.

Working in the Barcelona 22@ district the research method taught in this media elective will develop urban system analysis tools using the block-by-block planning guidelines to support city planning from the bottom up. Students will use methods of parametric urban design and to allow the values of a place to emerge from the bottom up over time by workers, residents and tourists. Work will be shared with Director Salvador Rueda of the Agencia de Urbanismo Ecologia to support a Social Simulator. Urban analysis tools may also be used with agencies in Portland and Eugene.
Part I of the course will investigate work at the scale of Barcelona Eixample blocks testing unit/whole relationship at the scale of the block, neighborhood and district. Current block planning guidelines transform the industrial for an information activities district for workers and residents. Block minimums require 10% of the following uses without specifying their locations: open space, residential and 7@ institutional use. The resulting system adapts to existing conditions of protected art nouveau, Modernisme, built-fabric supporting an urbanism of agglomeration of fragmented spaces. How will existing and predicted real-life differences affect this abstract system including existing built-fabric, social behaviors, transportation networks, edge conditions, uses, and geogspatial orientation as evolvable framework for participation? Case studies will include parametric urban design by Michael Weinstock, Patrick Schumacker and Zaha Hadid, Stan Allen and James Corner, Vicente Guillart and MVRDV. Live maps will also be created.
Part II of the course will allow students to develop an abstract bottom-up parametric system that is calibrated and applied to the real-world contextual conditions of the 22@ district as well as Portland and Eugene.
*Knowledge and software of Rhinoceros 5.0 and Grasshopper is required. Readings of theory, media exercises and urban design methods will be used in a lecture and workshop format. 2013 Ebook + lcaBCN http://www.lcabcn2013uo.wordpress.com
macintosh hd:archive:work:njit spring 2011:barcelona 2011:books:book session one 22@:image archive to book:maps:week 4_bottom-up_22@:22@barcelona_plan copy.jpg
22@ district planning

The investigation will work at the scale of Barcelona Eixample blocks testing unit/whole cause and affect at the scale of the block, neighborhood and district. The current block planning guidelines transform the unplanned post-industrial blocks of 22a to provide for the 22@ objectives to for an information activities district for workers and residents. Block minimums require 10% of the following uses without specifying their locations: open space, residential and 7@ institutional use. The resulting abstract system adapts to existing conditions of protected art nouveau, Modernisme, built-fabric supporting an urbanism of agglomeration of smaller, fragmented lots and spaces for targeted small and medium sized information and design enterprises. The strategy prescribes no further top-down relationships between symmetrical blocks yet gaming theory suggests that minimal inequities will cause asymmetrical ‘tilting.’ How will existing and predicted real-life differences affect this abstract system including existing built-fabric, social behaviors, transportation networks, edge conditions, uses, and geographic orientation? How can this planning strategy provide a framework for participation that is evolvable?
Case studies will include urban system design by Ana Pla Catala, Michael Weinstock, Patrick Schumacker and Zaha Hadid, Stan Allen and James Corner, Vicente Guallart, MVRDV and others. The case studies will give students an opportunity to develop techniques of parametric design at the scale of the city, testing limits, theory and context behind each designer’s work.
The second part of the course will allow students to develop an abstract bottom-up parametric system that is calibrated and applied to the real-world contextual conditions of the 22@ district and other locations including Portland and Eugene.
Student knowledge of abstract diagramming techniques, Rhinoceros and Grasshopper will he helpful. The course will utilize theoretical readings, techniques and bottom-up urban design methods in a lecture and workshop format.

c:\archive\work\njit spring 2011\barcelona 2011\books\book session one 22@\image archive to book\maps\week 4_bottom-up_22@\4_pluralism_22@recipe.jpg

22@ use guidelines, Ajuntament de Barcelona
Course Purpose / Introduction

  • Learn the limits of parametrics and urban design

  • Neighborhood planning and identity, bottom up, in 22@

  • Build parametric skills

  • Theory, reading and writing skills, update of contemporary conversation

  • Plug Department of Architecture into global conversation of parametrics and urban design topic (weblog that feeds to DMC and Department website)


Approach, Readings

  • 22@ Background + Theory on Adaptive Systems

    • Bruno Latour & Albena Yaneva, Give me a Gun and Ill Make All Buildings Move

    • Philip Speranza, Parametric Places 22@: Smart Urban Analysis Tools and Place Branding Value

    • Stan Allen, Field Conditions (Systems thinking)

    • James Corner, Not Unlike Life Itself (Frameworks: open-ended but specific)

    • Alejandro Zaera-Polo, Between Ideas and Matter (Abstract and real; Drawings and Diagrams)

    • Philip Speranza, Place Branding from the Bottom Up: Strengthening Cultural Identity through Small-Scaled Connectivity

    • Jane Jacobs, The Nature of Economies (Positive and negative feedbacks)

    • Manuel De Landa, A Thousand Years of Non-Linear History, (evolvable criteria + agglomeration)

    • 22@ Ten Years of Urban Renovation: models, MBM, Manel Bailo, others

    • PUARL Paper: Eixample, Olympic Village, 22@

    • Manuel Sola-Morales: 10 lessons of Barcelona, chapter “05: The Eixample”


macintosh hd:archive:work:2011 oregon_research:423 523 seminar_spring_parametric place-22@ bottom up planning:images:1741-el-poblenou-1928.jpgmacintosh hd:archive:work:2011 oregon_research:423 523 seminar_spring_parametric place-22@ bottom up planning:images:figure 1.5a.jpg

Data / Method
I. Case Studies of Parametrics and urbanism: rebuilding Grasshopper definitions

  • Michael Weinstock, AA, student project Edible Infrastructures

  • Patrick Shumaker and Zaha Hadid

  • Field Operations, Allen Corner

  • MVDRV, various projects

  • Vicente Guallart, IaaC

  • Karen McClosky, University of Pennsylvania

  • Neil Leach, Swarm Systems

II. Creating systems- kickoff project

  • Abstract

    • Analog tiling, Time Based systems, modeling bottom-up systems

    • Simple parametrics, Grasshopper intro

    • Map existing conditions

    • Identify live inputs? How to integrate live inputs?

    • Inputs to system? 22@ data, Oregon data SRML, cell phones, GIS?

  • Real World, 22@ study area

    • Select study area + District, neighborhood, urban room

    • **Limits of study- not qualitative, how to indicate qualitative aspects

    • What are parameters? What is timeline, period of time based system?

    • Software limits?


macintosh hd:users:philipsperanza:documents:archive:work:2011 oregon_research:523_s14:sound 01 copy.jpgSound Pollution Tool with students Pedro Perralta, Eleazar Racoma and Alexandra Lambrechts, © lcaBCN 2013, Speranza Architecture
Deliverables:

Reading, Writing abstracts/outlines, discussions



  • Weeks 1-2 intensely building a dialogue/language

    • Writing Assignment and Skills development (Tiling exercise, Rhino)

Case Study diagrams

  • Week 2, Research, Documentation and Analysis. Identify + build class understanding

  • Also consider previous examples of similar projects in Parametric Places 2012 and 2013, lcaBCN 2013 and Portland Measured Attachment Studio for the Milwaukie Alignment

  • Skills building (Rhino / Grasshopper)

Rebuild Case Study or kickoff system in Grasshopper

  • Weeks 2-3, unit to whole

  • Week 4, presentations to group (share, identify, understand why, chart findings)

Final project in Grasshopper, “Off-Site” vs “On-Site”

  • Weeks 5-9, Consider “Social Simulator” BCN Ecologia or Air Pollution indicators

    • Research, week 5

    • Analog building system, week 5-6

    • Testing technique, abstract, 6-7 **Present findings to group, limits, questions

    • Building system, 22@ unit/whole, 7-9

    • Final system, second pass, design communication, 9-10

Catalog

Develop blog, ebook and printed catalog for presentation to City of Barcelona, Portland Planning and Sustainability and Barcelona Agency of Urban Ecology with Salvador Rueda


Critical design issues

  • Context

  • Organizational systems

  • Parametric Modeling at the scale of blocks and the city


Method

This course is organized as one lecture group and smaller lab setting in which students engage in independent project-based learning. The course time will be split between lectures, discussion and workshops using the analog and digital media in the lab environment. The work will be shared in class to foster peer-to-peer learning. Class meetings include a variety of communication formats including lectures, tutorials, desk-critiques, pin-ups, reviews, in-class discussions and reading assignments. *Students are required to document their work to a digital archiving system.


Evaluation

Performance in course will be graded. Student work will be evaluated for achievement in all of the areas listed in the Department of Architecture's studio evaluation form.


Attendance Policy

Students are expected to attend all course meetings, be on time, and stay for the entire scheduled session working on course activities. Unexcused absences are not permitted. Students with three (3) or more unexcused absences are required to meet with their instructor before returning to studio. Excused absences (such as illness or personal emergency) must be reported to the instructor prior to the missed class if at all possible.


Grading

20% PROJECT 1 /// Writing Assignment

30% PROJECT 2 /// Case Study

40% PROJECT 3 /// Final definition and application/test

10% Class Participation
Students will not receive a final grade until all work has been uploaded for digital submission.
Projects

The projects for this course are designed to encourage exposure to various means of communicating your designs through a variety of tools including everything from hand sketching to digital modeling. Detailed descriptions and requirements will be given at the time each project is assigned.


Schedule (this schedule may change with notice)
Background, Objective, Language: 22@, Barcelona, Grasshopper, Parametrics; Writing Assignment

Week 1 T 04/01 Introductory Lecture Lecture/Workshop

Th 04/03 Barcelona+Parametrics Lecture/Workshop
Case Studies

Week 2 T 04/08 Analog Digital Parametrics Lecture/Workshop

Th 04/10 Workshop
Week 3 T 04/15 Definitions development Lecture/Workshop

Th 04/17 Workshop


Week 4 T 04/22 Presentations Lecture/Workshop

Th 04/24 Workshop


Final Project, definition modeling 22@ block guidelines

Week 5 T 04/29 Lecture/Workshop

Th 05/01 Workshop
Week 6 T 05/06 Lecture/Workshop

Th 05/08 Workshop

Week 7 T 05/13 Lecture/Workshop

Th 05/15 Workshop


Week 8 T 05/20 Lecture/Workshop

Th 05/22 Review/ Presentations


Week 9 T 05/27 Lecture/Workshop

Th 05/29 Workshop


Week 10 F 06/06 Final presentation, date to be confirmed
Week 11 F 06/06 Digital Archive Posting, date to be confirmed

Attendance

Attendance is mandatory. Lateness will be counted 15 minutes after class has started. Absences will be counted 30 minutes after class has started. After 3 unexcused absences your grade will be lowered by a grade point for each additional absence if you do not have a written medical, school or religious excuse. All students are expected to participate in class discussions and to develop their projects beyond the minimum requirement.


PROJECT OWNERSHIP, PUBLICATION, AND PUBLICITY

Work created for credit and/or using the facilities of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts belongs jointly to the school and the student. The AAA reserves the right to document and display all original work for the purpose of documenting student performance as mandated by the National Architecture Accrediting Board [NAAB]. Furthermore, the school reserves the non-exclusive right to use images or likenesses of the work for publicity and display in print and electronic media as well as to submit such work for competitively reviewed exhibitions or to various award programs, The School and its representatives [including faculty and teaching staff] have the non-exclusive right to use such work as illustrations in scholarly and/or technical publications and presentations.



Special Accommodations


If you have a documented disability and anticipate needing accommodations in this course, please make arrangements to meet with faculty soon. You should also request that the counselor for students with disabilities send a letter verifying your disability.
Reading References

Allen, S. (1999), “Field Conditions,” Points and Lines, Princeton Architectural Press, New York, NY.

Allen, S. (1998), “Diagrams Matter”, in ANY 23, Dec. 1998

Barcelo, M. (2001), La Ciutat Digital, Pacte Industrial de la Regio Metropolitana de Barcelona, Beta

Franck, K (2007) Design from the Inside Out, Wiley, West Sussex, England

Jacobs, J. (2001), The Nature of Economies, Random House, New York, NY.

Jacobs, J. (1969), The Economies of Cities, Vintage Books, New York, NY.

Koolhaas, R. (1994), Delirious, Monacelli, New York, NY.

de Landa, M. (2000), A Thousand Years of Nonlinear History, Zone Books, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.

de Landa, M. (2001), course lecture for: Theories of Self Organization the Dynamics of Cities. GSAPP

Scwartz, P. (1991), The Art of the Long View, Doubleday, New York, NY

Tschumi, B. (1996), Architecture and Disjunction, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.

Zaera-Polo, Alejandro (2010) “Between Ideas and Matters: Icons, Indexes, Diagrams, Drawings and Graphs”, AD The Diagrams of Architecture, Wiley, West Sussex, England
Appendix
Appendix 1.0, Urban Genome Taxonomy of Urban Experiences


  • Food Systems

  • Transit including pedestrian, bike share, bus, metro, private vehicles

  • Commercial Streetscape / Services and Goods

  • Production/ New industry

  • Recreation / Physiology including playgrounds, gyms, running and walking paths, fields, etc.

  • Cultural Events

  • Food Production

  • Social Services

  • Place Making / Place Branding of Local Identity

  • Shelter

  • Spiritual including mood alteration, religion, escape

  • Family

  • Political, Top Down and Bottom Up Participation

  • Safety (including transit routes, equipment, parental surveillance, health)

  • Education

Appendix 2.0, Parametric Places / lcaBCN
DEFINE PROBLEM: What is the question or problem to solve in the 22@ district?

QUALITY: What is the quality to attach to that responds to the problem of community design between works and residents in the 22@ neighborhood?

- Research: Comparative graphics to examples such as Portland, NYC or national averages.

- Visual Language: develop visual language for parametric variations



CRITERIA: Develop criteria that support the overall quality of the tool

- Criteria to Indicators: Identify indicators of this first criteria mapping (3-5 criteria to measure, existing data), 3 x3 block area, map

- Analyze: Analog to Digital

- Repeat in comparative location (Ex. Granada, Spain)



MODEL AS ANALYTICAL AND VISUALIZATION TOOL

- Identify and study parameters at unit parcel

- Abstract modeling at one block, unit parcel to unit block module

- Identify useful plugins and script as required to build Grasshopper “tool”

- Real-world case-study block in 22@, 3D Rhino model as necessary

MODEL AS SYNTHESIS TOOL, *AGENCY

- Apply tool to 3 x 3 test areas around original real-world study block



- Develop and refine parametric relationship, use plugin such as Galapagos as required.

- Parametric Formula (Diagram)


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