Palmdale School District 2014-15 4th Grade Quarter 2 Forms of Literature



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Palmdale School District
2014-15

4th Grade

Quarter 2

Forms of Literature


Literature Core Text: DK Readers Greek Myths

Informational Core Text: Social Studies textbook, Leveled Reader

Materials:

Level Biography Reader, Student notebook, multiple graphic organizers or Thinking Maps, and chart or butcher paper for brainstorming.



Supporting Texts: The Gods and Goddesses of Olympus, D’Aulaires Greek Myths, The Adventures of Thor the Thunder God,Science textbook, web resources, autobiographies, biographies, HM

Reading Literature Standards:

RL 1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RL 2: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

RL 3: Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

RL 6: Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

RL 7: Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.

RL 9: Students will find similarities and differences in themes, topics, and patterns of events among culturally diverse stories, myths, and traditional literature.


Reading Informational Text Standards:

RI 1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RI 2: Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

RI 3: Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

RI 6: Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.

RI 7: Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

Writing Standards:

W 2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because). Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.

W 9: Draw evidence from literary or informational

texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

a. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to literature.

b. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational

texts.


Supporting Standards:
RL4

RL5


Essential Questions:

RL 1: How do I use details/examples to explain what a text says directly?

How do I use details/examples to explain what a text says indirectly?



RL 2: How do details help readers determine the theme of a story, drama, or poem?

RL 3: How does the characters change based on an event?

How does the setting impact the story?



RL 6: How does the narrator’s point of view influence the events in the story?

RL 7: How does a visual or oral presentation show what the author is saying?

RI 1: How do I use details/examples to explain what a text says directly? How do I use details/examples to explain what a text says indirectly?

RI 2: How do details help readers determine the main idea of a text? How do I summarize what I’ve read?

RI 3: How do I use details to explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in informational text?

RI 6: How is the information different in a firsthand account versus a secondhand account?

RI 7: How do visual components contribute to my understanding of a text?

W 2: How do writers convey ideas and information clearly in an informational piece?



Summative Unit Assessments:

  • Choose one Greek god/goddess, and write an informative/explanatory essay clearly introducing the god/goddess giving concrete details, quotations, or

other information and examples taken from the text. RL 1, 2, 3, & W2

Additional Summative for Informational Text: (optional)

  • Students read a first-hand account of a historical event or a scientific discovery and a second-hand informational article about the same event or discovery. Students will create a Venn Diagram or Double Bubble Map showing how the two texts are alike and different. The students should cite specific examples from the text as well as general observations regarding point of view and perspective. RI 6



Weeks 1 and 2:

Learning Targets:
RI 1: Students will refer to the details and examples of the text when explaining what the text says and making inferences about the text.
RI 2: Students will identify the main topic using details from the Social Studies text.
RI 3: Using the details from the text, students will use a timeline to describe the important events that occurred during John Sutter’s life.
RI 6: The students will compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of a historical figure.
RI 7: Looking at a timeline, students will explain how the information contributes to the understanding of the text.

Standards:
RI 1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RI 2: Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

RI 3: Explain events, procedures, ideas or concepts in a historical, scientific or technical text including what happened and why based on specific information in the text.

RI 6: Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided.

RI 7: Interpret information presented visually, orally and quantitatively (e.g. in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding the text in which it appears.

This first two weeks of this unit the focus is on looking at firsthand and secondhand accounts of a historical figure. In the Social Studies resources (Leveled Biographies) and Science Textbook, teachers will find the biography on John Sutter, the Social Studies textbook information on the Gold Rush Era, and interpreting information presented visually, orally, and quantitatively. The goal during these two weeks is to master the Informational Text Reading Standards. The overarching theme of this unit is Traditional Literature, although during these two weeks teachers will start introducing primary and secondary sources to meet the requirements from the Common Core Standards.



Discussion/Questions: (Week 1 & 2)


  1. What is the author emphasizing mostly in the firsthand account?

  2. What is the author emphasizing in the secondhand account?

  3. Is the information provided by the authors the same or different?

  4. What words tell us this is an autobiography?

  5. What words tell us this is a biography?

  6. Identify the main idea of the text.

  7. Determine which details support the main idea.

  8. Explain how the main idea is supported by the details.

  9. Use key details and main idea to summarize the text.


Vocabulary Instruction: compare and contrast, main idea, text, key details, determine, support, explain, summarize, account (rendering of a story), firsthand source (primary source that provides firsthand testimony received from the original source), secondhand (contain information gathered from sources such as: biographies, dissertations, journal articles and monographs),

  • e.g.: suppose there had been a car accident, the description of the accident which a witness gives to the police is a primary source because it comes from someone actually there at the time. The story in the newspaper the next day is a secondary source because the reporter who wrote the story did not actually witness it. The reporter is presenting a way of understanding the accident or an interpretation.



Tasks: (Week 1)


  • Compare and contrast the difference between an autobiography (See Appendix D – John Sutter) and a biography using a Double Bubble Map or Graphic Organizer about John Sutter (found in Social Studies Text Leveled Biography, also included in Appendix D) during the Gold Rush Era. RI 6

  • Resource for autobiography http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist2/gold.html  Also provided in Appendix D

  • Resource for biography found in Social Studies Textbook Leveled Reader Biography

  • Review pages 68, 102, 244, 286, and 434 from the Social Studies textbook (Our Golden State) for primary sources with the students to meet RI 6.

  • Use the Social Studies textbook (pgs. 28-29, 110, 160, and 312). Point out and discuss how the features of the text (charts, diagrams, animations, interactive elements on web pages, timelines, or graphs) contribute to an understanding of the text in which it appears. RI 7

  • Create a timeline or Flow Map to describe the important events that occurred in John Sutter’s life. RI 3, RI 7

  • Example resource for timeline (as you click on particular dates additional information will appear). http://score.rims.k12.ca.us/activity/suttersfort/pages/timeline.html

  • Using the Social Studies Textbook Unit 3, Chapter 7, Lesson 1 (pgs. 230-235), have students determine the main idea and the key details using a graphic organizer. Review the Big Idea and Essential Question from the text. See Appendix A for Main Idea/Key Detail graphic organizers. RI 2

  • After reading an informational text about a famous person in history, as a whole class, teacher models writing a letter posing as that famous person. Teacher will help students make explicit references to the text within the details of their writing and draw inferences based on their reading (anyone from the Gold Rush Era e.g. James Marshal – see Appendix D, 49ers(not in appendix D), Chinese Miners (not in appendix D), etc.) RI 1

  • Use sentence frames or question stems along the way to have students create questions and answer them about main idea and key details of the text.


Tasks: (Week 2)

  • Use the Science Textbook (pgs. 32 – 35) to teach RI 7. Point out and discuss how the features of the text (charts, diagrams, animations, interactive elements on web pages, timelines, or graphs) contribute to an understanding of the text in which it appears.

  • Use the Social Studies Textbook, Unit 3, Chapter 7, Lesson 2 (pgs. 236-243), have students determine the main idea and the key details using a graphic organizer. Review the Big Idea and Essential Question from the text. See Appendix A for Main Idea/Key Detail graphic organizers. RI 2

  • Use sentence frames and/or question stems along the way to have students create questions and answer them about main idea and key details of the text. (see Appendix A for sample question stems, sentence frames, and question generator).


There are less tasks on the second week due to giving more time for the CFA’s.
CFA

  • Primary and secondary sources: In a quick write, journal, diary entry, Graphic Organizer or Thinking Map, have students read different sources of texts both primary and secondary in which the students are to identify the difference between the two using evidence from the text. (See Appendix D for CFA on primary and secondary sources.) RI 6




  • After researching a famous person from the Gold Rush Era, students will write a letter posing as that famous person to someone who historically had an impact on their life. Students will make explicit references to the text within the details of their writing and will draw inferences based on the text. RI 1


Weeks 3 and 4:

Learning Targets:

RL 1: Students will refer to the details and examples of the text when drawing an inference.

RL 2: Students will use the details (both directly from text and inferred) to identify the theme.

Students will use the details (both directly from text and inferred) to write a summary.



RL 3: Using the details (both directly from text and inferred), students will use a graphic organizer to describe character(s), setting(s), and event(s) in a story.

RL 6: Students will identify between the first or third person.

RL 7: Using a graphic organizer, students will compare and contrast the descriptive piece of text from a story to its video or audio counterpart that depicts the same portion of text.

W 9: Apply reading standards to literature in writing.

Standards:

RL 1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RL 2: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

RL 3: Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

RL 6: Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

RL 7: Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.

W 9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Please note that we are moving from the RI standards to the RL standards. Poetry will be the focus during weeks 3 & 4.

Week 4: Background Knowledge for teachers on Haiku Poems

  • Form: Traditional Japanese haiku have seventeen syllables divided into three lines of five syllables, seven syllables, and five syllables respectively. These syllable counts are often ignored when haiku are written in other languages, but the basic form of three short lines, with the middle line slightly longer than the other two, is usually observed.

  • Structure: Haiku divide into two parts, with a break coming after the first or second line, so that the poem seems to make two separate statements that are related in some unexpected or indirect way. In Japanese, this break is marked by what haiku poets call a "cutting word." In English and other languages, the break is often marked by punctuation. This two-part structure is important to the poetic effect of a haiku, prompting a sense of discovery as one reads or a feeling of sudden insight.

  • Language: Haiku should include what Japanese poets call a kigo -- a word that gives the reader a clue to the season being described. The kigo can be the name of a season (autumn, winter) or a subtler clue, such as a reference to the harvest or new fallen snow. Through the years, certain signs of the seasons have become conventional in Japanese haiku: cherry blossoms are a kigo for spring, mosquitoes a kigo for summer. Sometimes, too, the kigo will refer to an individual moment in the natural cycle, such as dawn or moonrise, without reference to a particular season. The kigo is also important to the haiku's effect, anchoring the experience it describes in a poetic here and now that helps sharpen the imaginative focus.

  • Subject: Haiku present a snapshot of everyday experience, revealing an unsuspected significance in a detail of nature or human life. Haiku poets find their subject matter in the world around them, not in ancient legends or exotic fantasies. They write for a popular audience and give their audience a new way to look at things they have probably overlooked in the past.

Teacher Background for Week 3:

When reading “Casey at the Bat” teachers will need to provide background knowledge of the rules of baseball in order to have a deeper understanding of the poem.



Refer to the two different poetry analyses on “Casey at the Bat” (See Appendix D)

More resources for poetry:

  • http://learn.lexiconic.net/elementsofpoetry.htm

  • http://curriculum.austinisd.org/la/resources/documents/LA_Wtg5th_Poetry_PoetryAssessTeacherGuide.pdf


Discussion Questions for Week 3:


  1. How are the story and the visual presentation (picture, drawing or video) the same? RL 7

  2. How are the story and the oral presentation (speech, recording) the same? RL 7

  3. How does the drawing/visual show what the author is saying? RL 7

  4. What can you infer about the author’s meaning about the poem? RL 1

  5. What is the main idea of this poem? RL 2

  6. What is the setting of the poem? Use specific details from the text. RL 3

  7. Summarize the poem in your own words. RL 2

  8. After reading the poem and listening to the speech/recording, what is the theme or message of the text or poem? RL 2


Tasks: (Week 3)


  • Make a poetry flipbook with these terms: verse, rhythm, meter, stanza, imagery (See poetry ppt. on the PSD website). This can be an ongoing project throughout the poetry section.

  • Students refer to the structural elements (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) of Ernest Lawrence Thayer’s “Casey at the Bat” when analyzing the poem

See Appendix D RL 1,2&3 Have students find examples of verse, rhythm, imagery, stanza and meter within the poem.

  • Refer to the discussion questions for weeks 3 & 4 to promote understanding and conversations about the poem. RL 1, 2, 3 & 7

  • Using a graphic organizer, teacher models how to compare and contrast the written poem to its audio form http://www.reelyredd.com/1106caseyatbat.htm. You can also access a video version on School Tube. RL 7

  • For example, When Casey says, “The Outlook wasn’t brilliant for the Mudville nine that day:” in the poem, how did you feel compared to how you felt when you heard it from the audio version of the poem?


Optional Tasks for Week 3:

  • Read poems by Shel Silverstein: (see Appendix D) Read the poems once for enjoyment. The second time, begin to analyze the poems and prompt students using the discussion questions and referring to the vocabulary that is used in the flip book. For example, have students identify imagery and/or rhythm in the poem.

  • Using a diary entry, journal, quick write, or exit ticket, have students answer discussion questions #5 & #7 from above.

  • The following activities may lead into Week 4. Choose one or more of the following poems and compare the written form to the audio/video form of the same poem. Using a graphic organizer or Thinking Map, model for students how to compare and contrast the descriptive piece of text from a story to its video. RL 7

  • Dr. Martin Luther King’s Speech. (see Appendix D for speech) http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=94828

  • Read Martin Luther King: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/08/27/transcript-martin-luther-king-jr-have-dream-speech/#ixzz2draaHmY4

  • Carl Sandburg – Jazz Fantasia (see Appendix D) http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=226604

  • Walt Whitman- O Captain My Captain (see Appendix D) http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=49438


CFA

  • Read Shel Silverstein’s poem “SMART” – (see Appendix D). Have students listen to the video of the poem “SMART” on Teacher Tube http://www.teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=803 Using a graphic organizer or Thinking Map students will compare and contrast the descriptive piece of text from a story to its video. RL 7


Discussion questions for Haiku poems Week 4:

  1. How are haiku poems composed?

  2. How do they differ from other forms of poetry? How does a haiku paint a picture or create an image with just a few words?

  3. What makes this form of poetry seem so personal, intimate, and appealing?


Tasks: (Week 4)

  • Use the HM Textbook to introduce Haiku poems (pgs 78-79). Use the following poem: Haiku by Basho http://www.columbia.edu/itc/eacp/asiasite/topics/index.html?topic=Haiku+subtopic=Intro (“Asian” Haiku poems along with audio) (See Appendix D for the written Haiku poem) to compare the written form to the audio/video form of the same poem. Using the AVID two-column notes, have students write a line on the left from the Haiku and have students write their interpretation on the right. RL 1, 2, & 3

  • Use the following link to introduce several examples of Haiku poems

  • Haiku for People http://www.toyomasu.com/haiku/ (This site includes the history of the Haiku poems along with 26 different examples of Haiku poems) Drawing on the students' observations, provide an outline of the main rules for writing haiku, as explained at Haiku by Basho and Haiku for People:

  • Nature Haiku Poems http://www.pocanticohills.org/occhicone/03/haiku.htm (See Appendix D)

  • Model and show students how to create a Haiku poem.

  • Have students choose one Haiku from the following website, http://www.pocanticohills.org/occhicone/03/haiku.htm and complete an AVID one pager (See directions in Appendix A). RL 1, 2, & 3

  • Students create their own Haiku poem. (If time is available, students should switch poems with one another and make inferences, and identify themes.) RL 1, 2, & 3



CFA:

  • Use the Haiku CFA in Appendix D and have students analyze the poem for imagery.

  • Optional CFA: Write your own Haiku.


Teachers consider the Language Standards when grading this with your PLC.



Weeks 5 and 6:

Learning Targets:

RL 1: Students will refer to the details and examples of the text when drawing an inference.

RL 2: Students will use the details (both directly from text and inferred) to identify the theme of the myths.

Students will use the details (both directly from text and inferred) to write a summary.



RL 3: Using the details (both directly from text and inferred), students will use a graphic organizer to describe character(s), setting(s), and event(s) in a story.

RL 6: Students will identify between the first or third person.

RL 7: Using a graphic organizer, students will compare and contrast the descriptive piece of text from a story to its video or audio counterpart that depicts the same portion of text.

RL 9: Using a graphic organizer, students will find similarities and differences in themes, topics, and patterns of events among culturally diverse stories, myths, and traditional literature.

W 9: Students will apply reading standards to literature in writing.

Standards:

RL 1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RL 2: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

RL 3: Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

RL 6: Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

RL 7: Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.

RL 9: Students will find similarities and differences in themes, topics, and patterns of events among culturally diverse stories, myths, and traditional literature.

W 9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Weeks 5 & 6 will cover mythology using the class sets of DK Readers Greek Myths by Deborah Lock and, The Gods and Goddesses of Olympus by Aliki (teacher copy), and D’Aulaires Greek Myths (teacher copy), and The Adventures of Thor the Thunder God (teacher copy).
Background for the Teacher:

Students will learn the definition of a myth: a fictional story, once thought to be true that tried to explain mysteries of nature and humankind. They will also learn about myths that include supernatural beings or events, and that myths give insight into the ancient Greek culture. Heroes were an important part of Greek mythology, but the characteristics Greeks admired in a hero are not necessarily identical to those we admire today. Greek heroes are not always what modern readers might think of as "good role models." Their actions may strike us as morally dubious. For example, in his encounter with the Cyclops, Odysseus helps himself to the giant's food without permission, attacks while the Cyclops is in a wine-induced stupor, and brags about blinding the one-eyed creature. This does not mean the Greeks admired thievery and bragging, however. What they admired about Odysseus, in this instance, was his capacity for quick thinking. Odysseus defied that which others would not (as is also shown by his desire to hear the Sirens' song) and pulled off great feats with panache and self-confidence. Not all Greek heroes were admired for the same reasons. Some, such as Odysseus, were admired for their resourcefulness and intelligence, whereas others, such as Heracles also known as Hercules, were known for their strength and courage. Some were not particularly resourceful but depended on help to accomplish their tasks. Whether or not a given action or quality was admired depended upon its ultimate results. Being headstrong might succeed in one instance but lead to failure in another. The Greeks held their characters accountable for their actions, and a hero might be punished as well as rewarded.


To support RL9, teachers and students will also be reading from The Adventures of Thor the Thunder God by Lise Lunge Larson in order to find similarities and differences in themes, topics, and patterns of events among culturally diverse stories, myths, and traditional literature.

“The Vikings worshipped many gods, but Thor was their favorite because he was the biggest, strongest, and bravest. He kept everyone safe from the evil giants. From the beginning of time, the gods and the giants disliked each other. The giants, who were huge and ugly, were jealous of the gods’ beauty. They also hated the gods for being cleverer than they were.” “…the giants knew some magic, but not magic so deep that living things sprang from it. Only the gods knew that kind of magic, and with it they had created the world and all the beings that lived there. More than anything the giants wanted to destroy the earth…” “They wanted to destroy the gods’ favorite creation, human beings. But as long as Thor protected them, this could not be. No wonder the Vikings loved him best.”




Background Task:

Before introducing Greek hero tales, give students a day or two to each identify a contemporary hero. Students can use print or other media as their source, but they should be prepared to explain what makes that person a hero.




  • Encourage students to share their stories of contemporary heroism. Compile a list of characteristics of our contemporary heroes. Enter these characteristics in the first column in the attached chart. (See Appendix A) Beside the characteristic, cite the individual who fits the characteristic and what s/he did to exemplify that characteristic. Explain to the students that they will study hero tales from Greek mythology to see which qualities of heroism do and do not match our contemporary ideas.

  • More Web sources on Greek Mythology:

  • http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/religionmyth/p/GreekDeities.htm

  • http://www.pantheon.org/miscellaneous/pronunciations.html

  • http://www.greek-gods.info/sounds/



Discussion Questions: These are general questions you can use with your class when reading any myth.


  1. What is mythology?

  2. What does the author mean when he/she says _______?

  3. What can you infer from what you have read so far?

  4. Why do you think that _______? Can you give specific examples from the text that support your thinking?

  5. What is the main idea of this myth?

  6. How do the Greek god’s actions help determine the theme?

  7. How do the Greek god’s actions help support the theme?

  8. How is the central message conveyed throughout the myth?

  9. Can you summarize what has happened so far?

  10. Convey to your partner in one sentence what the myth is about.

  11. Describe a Greek god/goddess in the myth using specific details.

  12. Describe the setting of the myth using specific details.

  13. Describe what happened in the myth when…

  14. What do you think _________ looks like (character or setting)?

  15. What words does the author use to describe _________ (character or setting)?

  16. What words let you know what the character was thinking?

  17. Did the environment affect the outcome of the myth?

  18. Who are the major characters in the myth?

  19. Explain the differences between a poem and a myth.



Week 5 Tasks:

  • Ongoing throughout the next two weeks: Create a flip book or character study map of the Greek mythological characters and Thor as they are introduced. The students should use this resource to cite evidence (RL9) in their written summaries for the CFA.

  • Using the DK Readers Greek Myths by Barbara Lock, read, “Stories of Old” (Pages 4-5) and “Family of Greek Gods” (Pages 6-13). Teachers will also include the use of The Gods and Goddesses of Olympus by Aliki, and/or D’Aulaires Greek Myths with the class to build background knowledge about Greek mythology. Be sure to have an open ended discussion with the class about the text focusing on standards RL 1, 2 and 3. (RL 1, 2 & 3)




  • Have students begin to fill in the chart (found in Appendix A) with the twelve Olympian gods/goddesses + 2on the left and their special power on the right. Students can use it as an easy reference when reading about the Greek gods/goddesses during this week.




  • Have students do a close read using the summaries provided on Zeus, Poseidon and Hades. (see Appendix A) Begin making a graphic organizer or Thinking Map of the characteristics of Zeus, Hades and Poseidon. RL 2

  • During a class discussion, have students compare and contrast the characteristics of the three gods citing information from their graphic organizer or Thinking Map. RL 3

  • Using the graphic organizer or Thinking Map have students write about the characteristics of each brother. RL 3

  • Read Pandora’s Box provided in Appendix A and “Pandora’s Jar” from DK Readers Greek Myths (pages 14-17) (For additional background information see D’Aularies’ Book of Greek Myths, pages 74 & 75). As a class please answer the discussions questions below and any of the general discussion questions from above that help in the comprehension of the story of Pandora.

  1. Describe how Pandora came to life.

  2. How does Pandora try to keep herself from opening the box?

  3. Describe the things that come out of the box. Where did they go?

Pandora’s Box will help teachers meet the needs of the supporting standard RL 4 (Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text including those that allude to significant characters in mythology). Many expressions used in modern day come from mythology (e.g. don’t open Pandora’s box, what’s your Achilles heel?, herculean task, narcissism, he has the Midas touch, etc…) If there is time, teachers can chart how some of our modem expressions come from mythological stories.



Week 6 Tasks:


  • Read Labors of Herecles ( pages 18-23 in DK Readers Greek Myths and listen to the video reading of Hercules’ story: http://www.storynory.com/2013/01/27/the-labours-of-heracles-part-1/. Compare and contrast the descriptive piece of text from a story to its video or audio counterpart that depicts the same portion of text. RL 7

  • Have students continue to fill in the chart (found in Appendix A) with the twelve Olympian/Norse gods/goddesses + 2on the left and their special power on the right. Students can use it as an easy reference when reading about the Greek/Norse gods/goddesses during this week. If time permits, they can also add Thor, the Norse god to their chart.

To support RL9, teachers and students will also be reading from The Adventures of Thor the Thunder God by Lise Lunge Larson in order to find similarities and differences in themes, topics, and patterns of events among culturally diverse stories, myths, and traditional literature.

“The Vikings worshipped many gods, but Thor was their favorite because he was the biggest, strongest, and bravest. He kept everyone safe from the evil giants. From the beginning of time, the gods and the giants disliked each other. The giants, who were huge and ugly, were jealous of the gods’ beauty. They also hated the gods for being cleverer than they were.” “…the giants knew some magic, but not magic so deep that living things sprang from it. Only the gods knew that kind of magic, and with it they had created the world and all the beings that lived there. More than anything the giants wanted to destroy the earth…” “They wanted to destroy the gods’ favorite creation, human beings. But as long as Thor protected them, this could not be. No wonder the Vikings loved him best.”


  • Teacher read-aloud “Why Thor is Called the Thunder God” from The Adventures of Thor the Thunder God (pages 5-12) and complete a Venn Diagram or Double Bubble Map comparing Thor and Zeus ( Keep in mind that in comparing the two characters, teachers should also point out the similarities in theme, topics and patterns of events). RL9



Optional Activities:

  • Offer this hypothetical situation to the students: You're trapped in a room with your greatest enemy, who has the only key and superior strength. How would you get out? Now share the story of Odysseus and the Cyclops. What personal traits allowed Odysseus to escape? What personal traits got him into (or might get him into) trouble?

  • For another take on the Greek hero, share the tale of Odysseus and the Sirens. Odysseus simply must hear the Sirens' song, because no other mortal has heard the song and survived. Though Odysseus's strength of character (and physical strength) fails him when confronted with the Sirens' song, his wits save him thanks to his pre-arrangements to prevent escape. In the process, Odysseus learns about himself.

  • Ask the students to brainstorm a list of chores they would really hate to do (even worse than the chores they already do). Then read the story of Hercules and the Twelve Labors. The EDSITEment resource The Perseus Digital Library has an illustrated online exhibit about Hercules that includes a retelling of the Twelve Labors. How would the students like to do Hercules's chores? What personal traits allowed Hercules to succeed? What personal traits got him into trouble?

CFA:


  • Write a summary on a mythological character that was studied. The students may use previous notes or graphic organizers to help them complete this task. Possible characters are Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Pandora, Hercules, and Thor. RL2



Weeks 7 and 8: Drama

Learning Targets:

RL 1: Students will refer to the details and examples of the text when drawing an inference.

RL 2: Students will use the details (both directly from text and inferred) to identify the theme.

Students will use the details (both directly from text and inferred) to write a summary.



RL 3: Using the details (both directly from text and inferred), students will use a graphic organizer to describe character(s), setting(s), and event(s) in a story.

RL 6: Students will identify between the first or third person.

RL 7: Using a graphic organizer, students will compare and contrast the descriptive piece of text from a story to its video or audio counterpart that depicts the same portion of text.

W 9: Apply reading standards to literature in writing.

Standards:

RL 1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

RL 2: Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text.

RL 3: Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

RL 6: Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

RL 7: Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.

W 9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

In weeks 7 and 8 teachers may choose to use “Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing” pages 278-289 in your Houghton Mifflin Anthology or “Pandora’s Box,” which is included in appendix D. If time permits, you may choose both.

Teacher Background:

Use the list of discussion questions to plan out how you will break up the play over the next two weeks.


Discussion Questions:

  1. What does the author/play write mean when she says _______?

  2. What can you infer from what you have read so far?

  3. Why do you think that _______? Can you give specific examples from the text that support your thinking?

  4. What is the main idea of this drama?

  5. How do the character’s actions help determine the theme?

  6. How do the character’s actions help support the theme?

  7. How is the central message conveyed throughout the story?

  8. Can you summarize what has happened so far?

  9. Convey to your partner in one sentence what the story is about.

  10. Describe a character in the play using specific details.

  11. Describe the setting of the play using specific details.

  12. Describe what happened in the story when…

  13. What do you think _________ looks like (character or setting)?

  14. What words does the author use to describe _________ (character or setting)?

  15. What words let you know what the character was thinking?

  16. Did the environment affect the outcome of the play?

  17. Who are the major characters in the play?

  18. Explain the differences between a poem and a drama/play.

  19. Is the play written in the first or third person? How do you know?


Tasks:

  • Create a Character Analysis chart using a Thinking map or graphic organizer. RL 3

  • Read the play, “Tales of the Fourth Grade Nothing” (HMR Page 278-289) as a whole class

  • Re-read the play assigning roles to individual students and act out the play. Compare and contrast the differences between simply reading the play and then the deeper understanding that comes from acting out the play. RL 7

  • Make inferences from details within the play (e.g. stage directions, descriptions etc.) RL 1

  • As a class, identify the theme throughout the play on chart paper. RL 2

  • Using a graphic organizer such as a flow map, sequence, or diagram chart out the events of the story. RL 3

Vocabulary: drama, cast, setting, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions, characters, plot, inference

http://www.ket.org/artstoolkit/drama/

http://voices.yahoo.com/free-printable-childrens-theatre-scripts-skits-and-2814880.html


CFA

  • Using the Character Analysis chart, choose your favorite character and describe why they had the most impact on you. Provide details from the text. RL 3





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